Tag Archives: belief

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moving forward

Moving Forward, Sticky Leadership Ideas Sell

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We’re moving on, or we’re moving forward. It’s a charge that many people have grown to expect as their team moves from obstacles, setbacks, or even failure. Is this good leadership?

Leadership requires responsibility. It requires action, effective communication, and fosters opportunity.

Change is often based on a decision. Sometimes it is based on a need, an obstacle, or an event.

Revenues falling short, you have a need.

Good momentum, suddenly halted, and you may have an obstacle.

Some unexpected force, an act of God, a stock-market crash, or a pandemic, any of these and many others might signal the start of an event that requires change.

Leaders often come to the table with new ideas. It is considered to be a fundamental part of leadership.

Are your ideas good? Will your idea work? Are you able to get buy-in?

Moving Forward

Whoever made the first donut likely did it accidentally or with purpose. Either way, the first donut, at the time, may not have seemed like a good idea.

We could probably say the same about flavored coffee, the personal computer, or built-in cameras on telephones.

Arguments against, or obstacles in the path, may have been a challenge that needed to be overcome.

It first, it may not have seemed like a good idea. Too expensive, or simply undesirable.

Creating change, or examining a product life cycle, can often be represented on a bell curve. In the beginning, not much is happening, it is hard to gain momentum. After the peak, it is much harder to grab a piece of the market or be successful.

The most difficult challenge may be that in the early moments, a good idea may be a tough sell. No one seems to know if the idea is good or bad.

Leader’s Lead

There are many components of leadership. The idea is that leaders lead forward. They help discover, create, or engage with forward movement.

Good ideas are often a hard sell at first. When a good idea gets sticky, you’ve probably achieved buy-in.

It’s more than just having an idea. Leadership includes the act of making them sticky at just the right moment.

Most ideas are just ideas until they move forward.

Long curves or short curves. Jumping on the curve early has the most advantage.

Belief often conditions what happens next.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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personal experiences

Personal Experiences Shape Belief More Than Talk

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Have you ever tried to convince someone to see it your way but you just can’t quite pull it off? Personal experiences are more powerful than chit-chat which is precisely why you must create an experiential experience.

Many businesses want change. They want to increase sales, improve efficiencies and build a dynamic culture that will lead them to becoming a best in class.

Yet, their success meets opposition, struggle, and stays stuck.

The workforce often doesn’t believe in change. It may not be because they don’t want change, it may be because they have a hard time believing in change.

Change leaders find it perplexing.

These leaders formulate a plan. Package it all nice and pretty, and roll it out to the masses with a prescribed strategy and metrics to guide the change effort. Yet, the workforce struggles to believe.

No matter how pretty the message, how well laid out the plan, it just doesn’t seem to happen.

Personal experiences might be to blame.

Personal Experiences

Great speakers and story tellers capture audience attention by connecting them emotionally to what they are describing.

It often develops from childhood. A parent reads a book out loud to they young child while the young child forms an image in their mind of what is being read.

The bonus of course is a picture book. It helps form a more complete image.

All grown up in the workplace a similar thing happens. One big difference is that the working adult usually has their own life experiences that are shaping their story. Not necessarily the story that is being told, but the story that they, as an individual, hear and imagine.

This is often why change efforts struggle, or worse, fail.

It may not be because the plan is bad, it may be because not enough people believe.

Beyond having a great plan, change leaders need to build trust and they need to help everyone involved see the vision and then actualize it.

If you’ve been burned a couple of times, someone telling you it won’t happen again is hard to believe.

Develop the story, but be prepared to shape belief through experiences.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Stronger points

Stronger Points May Be Exactly What You Need

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Have you made your point? Does anyone buy it? Making stronger points may be the difference between having a vision and creating reality.

In polite debates making your point might make a difference. Stronger points might make a difference in the meeting being held in the conference room, the chance encounter with your boss or the CEO at the coffee pot, or in the presentation that you worked on for weeks.

When we see something that is hard to believe, we often call it magic.

Magic has a special way of illustrating something that we probably can’t believe until we see it with our own eyes.

If you can see it for yourself, it is true.

Are you needing stronger points?

Stronger Points

This is exactly why the best workplace leaders are able to illustrate a clear vision. It is why strategy matters and why proper execution should be celebrated, put on a pedestal, and broadcast to everyone.

Belief is one of the most powerful psychological connections to work that you can have.

An Olympic athlete has a vision, and a work ethic to obtain the goal based on step-by-step plans carefully placed on a timeline. The timeline illustrates the intersection of preparedness with peak performance. The pursuit is about belief. Belief that it is real and that it can be achieved.

Workplace success shouldn’t be much different. The path, the vision, the roadmap, it is all part of the plan. A plan that once it is made believable, can come true.

Richard Branson proved it with Virgin Galactic.

Make some magic. Make stronger points.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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catchy projects

Catchy Projects, Do They Really Work?

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Do you have catchy projects? Do they attract interest, bring in new customers, keep existing customers, or engage your workforce?

People often discuss the law of attraction. One version of the law of attraction tends to suggest that what you think, is what will become true by your own creation. Think positive and you’ll see positive, think negative and you’ll find negative. Sort of a self-fulfilled prophecy kind of thing.

Having catchy projects is, well, attractive.

It is attractive for those who engage with it, and ideally it is attractive for the support of your cause or purpose.

In marketing circles people sometimes talk about things being sticky.

Good ideas are sticky. They aren’t easily shaken off.

The best products are sticky. Once you touch them, use them, or share them people don’t want to let them go.

Even the culture of your organization may be sticky. When you onboard new people they want to stick around.

Are catchy projects the root of success?

Catchy Projects

What makes a project catchy is not easily defined. It is more about the attraction to the project. What makes it clingy, magnetic, or sticky?

Generosity may be a starting point. Most people are receptive to something that feels generous.

Something that is easily shared, literally or metaphorically, might become catchy.

Most business cultures and business endeavors are in favor of catchy.

It is why branding is so important.

The next time you launch something new, whether it is a project, a product, or a service consider the attributes that might make it catchy.

Most things aren’t that catchy, yet the expectations usually are.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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golden rule

Golden Rule, Has It Shifted or Changed?

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A better question might be, “Should it?” Nearly everyone is familiar with the golden rule. Most people will suggest it represents treating others the way you would like to be treated.

Some people connect the golden rule with religious sentiments. Regardless of where or how you see the connection, has this rule changed?

Is treating others the way you would like to be treated still a good approach?

What are the expectations of others, are their expectations similar or different?

Everyone wants respect, but how is respect shown or illustrated? Is it being left to your own outcomes or is it getting a helping hand from someone else? Could it be based on your values and beliefs and if so, are those values and beliefs shared or mutually agreed upon?

The golden rule is tricky. On one hand it seems to make sense, yet, on another, it may not be a good rule.

Everyone Wants

Most people want, expect, or at least appreciate, being treated with kindness. I’ve seen a t-shirt or bumper sticker with the expression, “Mean people suck.” Of course, a bumper sticker isn’t any form of scientific measurement or evaluation, but they do sometimes resonate with others.

People want a chance to express themselves, they want to be able to voice their opinion without consequence or retaliation.

Most people want a chance to prove their value or worth. They want to contribute and in times of doubt, be given some leniency.

In short, they want a chance to live life as they see it.

Golden Rule

Does this all fit into the golden rule?

Not really.

The golden rule is based on your own values, beliefs, and opinions. Those are not necessarily consistent with others position on life.

Maybe the golden rule should be tweaked a little. Maybe it should be a little more of treating others the way they would like to be treated.

Freedom of choices or expressions. True freedom of speech, not just what fits a certain guideline. The benefit of the doubt, or acceptance of differences.

It seems like a simple rule. The golden one.

Yet, it may be much more complex than most people recognize. It often fits when it fits, and doesn’t when it doesn’t.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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skeptical believer

Skeptical Believer, Are You One Of Them?

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Have you factored workplace trust into the success of your organization? Are you a skeptical believer, or just moving about without giving belief much thought?

In workplace circles many people are convinced in what they believe. The right, the wrong, the labels, and the situations. What they see, what they perceive, is truth.

Often driven by expectations belief can be powerful, it can become extreme, and it also can become problematic.

Who do you choose to believe and why?

Skeptical Believer

People often choose to believe those that they trust. When you ask someone why they trust another person what is his or her response?

Do they trust from past experience with the person? Are they stereotyping, making assumptions, or simply giving the benefit of the doubt?

Is this blind belief? Belief based on science?

Much of the belief is suggested to come from a feeling. A trust your gut kind of experience. This trust is often analyzed in your mind based on past experiences.

A bad boss might create some emotional scars. The result, never trust the boss.

A co-worker who sells you out may create an unwillingness to trust team members.

It is often about an organization that looks like this, looks like that, acts that way, has employees who drive the cars or wear the clothes that you connect with a previous good or bad experience.

Risky Trust

Giving the benefit of the doubt in trust scenarios feels risky.

Not giving the benefit of the doubt may be halting progress.

Don’t blindly disregard your instincts, but when you don’t trust ask yourself why.

The absence of evidence may be the perfect reason to give someone the benefit of the doubt.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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wishful thinking

Wishful Thinking In The Workplace Is What You Need

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Wishing someone to “get well soon” seems helpful. Depending on the results, wishing for sunshine instead of rain, or warm weather instead of bitter cold may also feel good. Does wishful thinking change the outcomes in your workplace?

You may want to start with consideration for the reality of the wish. Wishing to lose weight while consuming several donuts and a sugared-up tall coffee may not make much difference.

It may not be realistic to wish for a winning lottery ticket, for someone to do your household chores, or that all the traffic lights will be green when you approach the intersection.

Wishing for someone to have a great weekend, a happy birthday, or a happy anniversary is a generous act. It is a kind gesture and it feels good.

Does wishful thinking help create business success, or is it really only for feel-good cheer?

Wishful Thinking

In the workplace, it may be beneficial to make wishes count. Certainly, far-out wishes that are unrealistic are not useful. In fact, they may even be counter-productive.

Wishing that sales will increase is a dangerous game without a strategy and tactics to pursue it. It’s similar to wishing that the quality will be good, customers will be happy, and that everything will go exactly as you expected.

If you don’t have a good plan, it is likely that very little will happen.

Wishing is not a plan.

It’s an act that provides focus, gives people something to look forward to, and may change future outcomes.

When there is a stretch goal, wishing for it to be achieved makes it much more likely than denying it as a possibility.

When others see the potential outcome as possible, team momentum gains strength. When people remove hurdles, go around customer satisfaction roadblocks, and strive to deliver the very best, positive things will happen.

Does wishing change outcomes?

Changing Outcomes

You aren’t going to change the weather, purchase the winning lottery ticket, or magically lose weight with a wish.

On the flip side, when you have a well-thought-out and well-executed plan that includes the necessary resources, one of the best things you can do is wish for great success.

A wish may be all that it takes to make others believe that it can come true.

Wishful thinking creates focus.

Focusing on the plan may be exactly what you need.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace beliefs

Do Workplace Beliefs Outweigh Documented Results?

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What are your workplace beliefs? Do you believe you and your team are doing your best work? Do believe in the quality, customer satisfaction, and the efficiencies of your goods or services?

Have you ever believed in something so strongly that you tend to ignore the facts?

People believe in many things.

Religion

Global Warming

Bigfoot

Aliens

Moon Landing

It only takes one of these to get people engaged in a discussion, and I haven’t even mentioned conspiracy theories, government transparency, and the age of the Great Sphinx of Giza.

Most beliefs are personal, that is why they are often said to be off-limits in the workplace or in mixed social settings. Religion and politics are two of the most commonly suggested to avoid.

Imagine a belief in any one thing. Imagine the belief to be so strong that you can’t see the facts, you deny the existence of evidence, and you push forward with your belief.

What effort or extremes might you go to in order to keep your belief alive?

Workplace Beliefs

Sometimes the missing element in the workplace is belief. Dreams are shattered, expectations squandered, and the future outlook appears to be more of the same.

Forcing people into a belief is unlikely at best.

It is compelling messages, forward motion, and the perception of evidence that help shape direction. Even when the data may illustrate something contrary to the belief.

You can present the facts, show the data, and tell the story. Personal commitment will always be based on belief.

People spend a lifetime trying to prove someone or something wrong. People spend a lifetime trying to prove something as correct.

Bring the documentation but it is not nearly as powerful as what each individual chooses to believe.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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best products

The Best Products Are Not Always Most Popular

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Do you choose the best products available? Are those products also the most popular? Is it true for the people in your workplace too?

Some products have all the rage. It’s true for household appliances, technology, and automobiles. You see it in fashion, hair styles, and vacation spots.

It’s also true with people. Performer’s, actresses, and sports stars. Even in your workplace there seems to be favorites.

Are any of these things or people the best? If so, compared to what?

What is the measurement criterion?

Popularity

Many people are sold on Apple products. Telephone’s, watches, and computing devices. Many will suggest they are the best.

Are they really the best or are they just wildly popular?

Cellular phones are popular, but which platform, Android or Apple?

You can discuss your reasons for either direction. However, much like a presidential election, choices and reasons get blurred by emotions, popularity, and opinions.

And similar to an election, if you going to discuss this, you’ll probably find argument from many that the most popular is also the best.

Is it true?

Best Products

When it comes to the best products, the best workplaces, or the best employee’s you often cannot have both the best performers and the most popular.

Most popular is a choice, the best performer is also often a choice.

Either of the two extremes seldom intersect.

Competition is a factor. How hard one product development team, an individual, or entire organization will work to beat the competition is always a factor.

You may want to reconsider the best versus most the most sought after.

With everything there is always a best kept secret.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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compelling belief

Compelling Belief Is Not Necessarily a Fact

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Have you been lured in by someone stating their compelling belief? Stated with confidence and vigor, it is often easy to believe.

People have strong opinions about political issues, yet they often can’t cite the framework of their opinions.

People have strong opinions about medical concerns. The 2020 pandemic has been the playing field for so-called experts.

Still other people have strong opinions about community activities, the size and style of your home, or even what you can do with your land.

When someone disagrees, goes in a different direction, or shrugs and walks away it is not necessarily a sign of intelligence. It may be a sign of different values or beliefs.

This is exactly why the narrative matters so much.

Compelling Belief

Doing something right now may not mean it is the wrong thing. It may just be the wrong thing at this time.

Expanding the marketing plan that has fuzzy results only makes sense when you believe.

Stating that the product doesn’t feel right is a belief. It may be factual to someone and understanding the feeling will get you closer to the facts.

Everyone believes something.

It may not be a shared belief because they haven’t heard the story behind it.

Is your story compelling?

The Real Story

If the story behind it is only based on opinions, it doesn’t make the narrative any more valuable.

Stating that you want someone to believe what you believe because it is a fact, may only be a matter of opinion.

It is only compelling when it resonates with the audience.

Uncompelled people may have different facts.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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