Tag Archives: belief

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decision commitment

Decision Commitment and Deciding What to Do

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Sometimes the best thing to happen next is to decide that you are going to decide. Decision commitment can be a stumbling block. Are you ready to leap over the obstacles?

Often it is not about a lack of options, it is about a lack of commitment to decisions.

If you’re in sales, you’ll want the customer to decide. Your goal is to close the deal. You’re in the business of helping other people decide.

Selling It

Isn’t everyone in sales? Can you sell to yourself?

Sometimes we have to sell it to ourselves. We have to take the big leap. Create the contract and stay committed.

In my consulting practice, the biggest obstacle I often see for clients is their inability to decide. They want something different, bigger, or better. They can see it, but their next decision means commitment and they may not be ready for it.

Decision Commitment

It feels so final. You contemplate over and over about the pros and cons? Will it work or will it crash and burn in disaster?

At every entry point you have a chance to decide that you will decide.

Here is the thing. It doesn’t have to be final. Your choice can be fluid. You can ebb and flow, make adjustments, take a break, or start again. If the number is too steep, adjust. The timeline is too fast (or slow), adjust it.

Procrastination and a lack of making a decision is often a crusher of momentum and certainly productivity. You know time is money. The inability to make a choice may be costing much more than the risk you’re contemplating.

Trust Yourself

A decision often starts with trusting yourself.

Is that something you can feel confident about? Do you trust yourself?

Your next decision may be a big one. The heat of the moment may not be the best time to decide, and sometimes a decision to do nothing is still a good decision.

You must decide.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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finding possibilities

Finding Possibilities Is Easier Than You Think

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What are the possibilities in front of you? Are there some, or are there none? Finding possibilities is often connected with where or how you look.

People often get stuck because of the limits that they place on the possibilities.

I’m not attending the evening networking event. No one is ever there to really connect with anyway.

We should do a video tutorial for our new product, but I’m not sure anyone will watch it.

I should send a resume to that new business in the industrial park, yet, I doubt they’ll consider me because of my lack of experience.

The amount of risk you are willing to take or the effort that you are willing to endure will show fewer or more possibilities.

The truth often is that people avoid things that they believe will cause too much effort or grief. The desire to make a change or do different things is limited by what the individual (or group) views as the return on investment.

Finding Possibilities

If you start a new exercise program, then you also must realize that you should change some of your eating habits too. The biggest reality is that none of this change will happen quickly. As a result, many never start.

People often don’t want to be on the hook. They don’t want the added responsibility on the job. They don’t want to workout three or four times per week. And diet, well, some chips and a soda often seem easier and more attractive than celery sticks.

For your career or business, the possibilities are likely endless. Except when you decide that being on the hook for the commitment is going to cost you.

Finding new possibilities depends on the price you are willing to pay.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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promoting workplace change

Promoting Workplace Change Starts With You

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It probably won’t take long to get agreement that everything around us is changing. Promoting workplace change is often a forced situation. It often feels more like push and not pull.

What is necessary to get change started?

If I said that climate change is real, would you believe me?

If I said that climate change is not real, would you believe me?

What if I said George W. Bush, was the best President? Barack Obama? Donald Trump?

You may find argument for any one of these scenarios. Largely it is based on our individual beliefs.

Believe It or Not

Our beliefs are often responsible for what moves us, what sparks efforts to change, and what keeps us going when there are bumps in the road. If you want change, you have to establish belief.

Around the workplace there is often and expressed need for more sales, higher quality, and better customer relationships.

Some of that starts with having the right products, establishing a better brand, and making sure you can logistically serve your customer.

All of these things may require occasional, or as some may see it, constant change.

Will your employee teams change?

It probably depends on what they believe.

Do they believe that better quality is achievable? Are they convinced that you are providing the best products or services at the right price? Do they find reason to value and build better customer relationships?

Are your employee teams driven by data and facts, or are they driven by commands sent down from the C-Suite?

Promoting Workplace Change

If you want the academic to believe you, you’re probably going to have to show her the research that proves it.

For the plumber, you’ll need proof that the sealant holds.

The architect may need a scaled model.

When you want to change something in your workplace it may require a little bit more than just commanding it. You may have to be compelling and create belief.

Nobody wanted to try Life Cereal until Mikey liked it.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace critic

Workplace Critic And Your Safety Zone

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Have you ever felt like your next move, any move, is going to be subject to the workplace critic? Does the workplace critic help improve things or drag down the performance of the team?

Critics sometimes believe they are helping the cause. They are quick to point out the inconsistencies, the shortcomings, and the reason things are not perfect.

Their argument is often that feedback improves performance. Their delivery may need some refinement.

Improving Performance

Understanding what customers want may improve performance. Nagging on another teammate about the relevancy of his or her contribution in the staff meeting, perhaps not so much.

It seems that there are always critics eager to tell someone what they have not done or not done that made their performance less. Shouldn’t we be trying to help others make their performance more?

Do we always need a critic or is it counter intuitive to a better future?

Policy and rule breakers need to be brought into check. Chronically late for work or meetings, should be fixed. Missing most deadlines, even the most reasonable ones, probably needs fixed.

Being the meeting after the meeting critic, well, not so much.

Workplace Critic

People need feedback. People have blind spots.

Are people still people? Yes, and many of them are working hard to make a difference. Harsh critics do not help.

Some of the best people quit or give-up in the face of harsh criticism.

What is the best way to deal with the critic?

Instead of retreating to your safety zone, hone your path, take away what you can, and keep giving everything you do, your best.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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cultural words

Cultural Words May Matter More

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When you say, “soda,” someone else may say, “pop.” Do cultural words matter in your workplace?

When someone says, “Things don’t add up.” We assume that to be a universal truth. The saying, “Two plus two isn’t equaling four,” makes us believe something is off.

It is hard to dispute math.

Words Matter

Words always matter. They matter much more than most people realize. A simple change in our sentences, a word here, or a word there, often make a difference.

In workplace cultures belief is powerfully connected to words.

We have exceptional customer service.

We ship fast.

Patience is one of our core values.

Of course, the truth in each statement is subjective. Belief in these statements will matter for sales, operations, and brand.

Belief is part of your culture. The words used to describe how things happen, what will happen, and when, create images that form the culture.

Do you believe it?

Cultural Words

Everyone should get the same result when they add ten and five together. If you don’t believe it, check it on a calculator.

A twelve-inch ruler is a universal truth. It’s one foot.

When you suggest your workplace culture is diverse, committed, and engaged it is not a universal truth. It is a belief.

A great culture doesn’t come to life because of the technology, infrastructure, or a fancy conference room. You may have 80,000 square feet, but not much of that tells us the truth about your culture.

Words help create the image. After that, it is up to everyone in the community to believe, or not.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Wrong people

Wrong People Are Often Right

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People worry about the risk of being wrong. Taking a chance, exploring an opportunity, what is the real cost? Wrong people are often also the same people who get it right.

What is the risk for you? Is it your image, your reputation, or the thought that you might be fired?

Statistics on Right

It is Little League World Series time in Pennsylvania. A time each year when thousands of people descend upon the small city of, Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

How many pitches will be thrown? How many strike outs, bases loaded, and catches dropped? What about base hits, home runs, and runs batted in?

Baseball is often much like our workplace life. The more chances we take the more chances we’ll have some success.

The statistical aspect of chances taken are what probably matters the most. One risk, one correct choice, seems easy. Looking deeper beyond the statistics you may ask, “How risky was that?”

Wrong People

It happens at the start of every brainstorming meeting. “No idea is a bad idea,” someone will proclaim. Yet, participants in the meeting will still wonder about the consequences before they speak.

Taking the risk of being wrong is the first step to taking a risk of being right.

Wrong people are not wrong all of the time. The trick is being right, at the right time.

Perfect scores, perfect seasons, and businesses and organizations on the move don’t happen without a few mistakes. The people who can live with being wrong are the same people who thrive on being right.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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hope

There Is Something Different About Hope.

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You’ve heard it before, “Don’t give up hope.” Hope may make the difference between dreamers and achievers.

One thing about hope is that it leaves room for disappointment.

I hope…

I’ll win the lottery.

It will be perfect weather.

My flowers will bloom.

There is always some room for things to come up short. The anticipation feels empty after coming up short on expectations.

Extra Effort

Some people give up too soon, too easily, and set their expectations too low.

Not because it is impossible, but because they make it impossible. If you don’t think that you can, you probably won’t.

When you insist that there will be limits, there will be. If you see the opportunity as too risky, it will be.

When you arrive at your job and believe it will be a painful experience, you’ll find evidence to support it.

Disappointment is part of life. So is your commitment for choosing how you’ll play it.

Without a little risk, without the extra effort, without a commitment to endure, what have you accomplished? What was the journey?

Realistic Hope

Hope should be realistic. Hoping that your horse becomes a unicorn seems silly and ridiculous.

Being committed to finding more energy in a time of need may start with hope. It may be similar for the outlook of health or happiness. In some cases, it may even change your situation for wealth.

Giving up hope is the first step to finding the limit. When you don’t risk disappointment there is little enthusiasm for the journey.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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my job

Will My Job Always Be This Way?

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Nothing lasts forever. I remember my job as a Computer Programmer, I was in my early twenties and a manager said to me, “Tough times don’t last but tough people do.” I liked it, and I never forgot it.

Grand Illusion

People sometimes get caught up in the idea that the present moment, the space they are in right now, is where they will be forever. It is an illusion of life that we allow when our frame is too narrow.

The project we are working on. It is temporary. The team we are working with, likely, is temporary. The software program, the difficult customer, and the person who annoys you. Temporary.

It will seem like common knowledge when I suggest that we can control our own fate. Yet, the frame that we sometimes hold ourselves behind does the opposite. It restricts us, limits us, and establishes belief patterns that can convince us of little hope for a better outcome.

My Job

Do you enjoy your work? Work is work, it probably has its moments of good and bad for everyone, yet rest assured that your job isn’t staying the same. Love it or hate it, things are going to change.

Business cycles change. Government regulations change. The needs of society will change.

If we experience an unexpected change, we may feel shock, frustration, and confusion. We may feel a lot of stress and pressure. This moment feels like bottom. Something is over, done, finished. The end.

Only if our frame says so.

Certainly, things end, even our job. The job we loved or the job we hated. It won’t last forever.

Stop believing that it will.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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language matters

Language Matters Because It Builds Culture

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What is the language of your workplace? Is there optimism, excitement, and energy? Language matters because it sets the tone and shapes the environment for everything that happens next.

“Good Morning,” is different from, “Ugh, here we go again.”

“I’m ready, let’s go,” is different from, “I’m not awake yet.”

We never know exactly what each day will bring. Yet we have a choice to decide what we will bring to each day.

What are your contributions to culture?

Building Culture

Every workplace has a culture. Every organization, business, and group effort have language behind their energy.

What is the language of your workplace? It is energizing or creating fear? Does it inspire confidence or get hung up on doom and gloom?

We are people, people with personalities, emotions, and feelings. We leap forward with inspiration or make a choice about fighting or retreating during fear.

Today you will make a choice about what you see. You’ll look for the opportunity, or describe a problem that cannot be solved.

You will believe that what is unfolding is happening for you, or to you.

Most of that belief will develop from your language. Tell yourself either you can, or you can’t. You will be correct.

Language Matters

Belief is powerful. Our belief systems are often created from the language that surrounds us.

Your team and your organizational culture are built by this belief.

Suggest that there is nothing good about this day. Chances are you’ll have a hard time finding something. It is a self-fulfilled prophecy.

Think carefully about what you’ll say today. It will guide what happens next.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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positive affirmations

At Work, Affirmations Lead The Way

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Are you committed to being more positive at work? How you approach your job each day may have something to do with what you constantly tell yourself. Are you using affirmations? Are they positive or negative?

Most rational people don’t go to the gym one time, pick up some weights, move them around, come home and look in the mirror only to be disappointed that they haven’t transformed.

The same could be said about one day of eating correctly, one day of taking the stairs, or just one day of professional study.

One day of any of those activities won’t create a big change. Do you agree?

What Are You Saying?

Our outlook, what we say to ourselves repetitively across time will shape our outcomes.

“This meeting is going to be long and boring.”

“This job is terrible. I hate my job.”

“My boss hates me and is never satisfied with my work.”

These affirmations, delivered to ourselves repetitively across time will almost guarantee that you will bring them to life. Yet, positivity seekers will insist that they are trying to be positive.

Saying to yourself, “I am trying to be positive.” will often end with, “but, I can’t be positive because…”.

Skip the “trying to be” and the “but,” and put your fate in motion.

Positive Affirmations

There is certainly the possibility that your next meeting may go into overtime. You may also not be in your dream job or your boss may find issues with your work. However, if you really want to make a difference, you’re going to have to affirm it.

At the end of the day discover what went well. Create a win list. Celebrate small victories. Find a reason why the meeting is valuable. Convince yourself you’ll get it right for the boss.

Use only positive affirmations. Tell yourself about it. Be deliberately repetitive.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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