Tag Archives: compelling

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compelling belief

Compelling Belief Is Not Necessarily a Fact

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Have you been lured in by someone stating their compelling belief? Stated with confidence and vigor, it is often easy to believe.

People have strong opinions about political issues, yet they often can’t cite the framework of their opinions.

People have strong opinions about medical concerns. The 2020 pandemic has been the playing field for so-called experts.

Still other people have strong opinions about community activities, the size and style of your home, or even what you can do with your land.

When someone disagrees, goes in a different direction, or shrugs and walks away it is not necessarily a sign of intelligence. It may be a sign of different values or beliefs.

This is exactly why the narrative matters so much.

Compelling Belief

Doing something right now may not mean it is the wrong thing. It may just be the wrong thing at this time.

Expanding the marketing plan that has fuzzy results only makes sense when you believe.

Stating that the product doesn’t feel right is a belief. It may be factual to someone and understanding the feeling will get you closer to the facts.

Everyone believes something.

It may not be a shared belief because they haven’t heard the story behind it.

Is your story compelling?

The Real Story

If the story behind it is only based on opinions, it doesn’t make the narrative any more valuable.

Stating that you want someone to believe what you believe because it is a fact, may only be a matter of opinion.

It is only compelling when it resonates with the audience.

Uncompelled people may have different facts.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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change dynamics

Change Dynamics and the Leaders Who Drive Them

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There is a difference between working in a changing environment and managing change. Change dynamics, or the situations and circumstances that drive organizational change, are often more about choice rather than force.

Work harder, push harder, do more, be efficient, are all commonplace thoughts for leaders wishing to improve metrics. One trouble spot is that leading through force is not as powerful as creating a compelling call-to-action.

Change Through Buy-in

Resistance to change, or the fear of change, is not about the generations, it is not about front-line instead of middle-management, it is about people, all people. Certainly, some people are more risk adverse than others, but change makes most people a little nervous.

Of course, the scale of change and the reasons for it play a role. Regardless, at some level most people think twice about change.

Buy-in is a commonplace term used to describe an action or recommended behavioral pattern for change.

We need buy-in for this change.

Go work with your teams to create buy-in.

Your department doesn’t appear bought-in for this change.

Buy-in is not created through fear or the authoritarian approach. Buy-in is created when there is a compelling reason to get committed.

Change Dynamics

An approach of, “My way or the highway.” will certainly make many people go through the motions. Fear springs people to action. People in motion may be accomplishing something, yet they may not be bought-in.

The conditions, reasons, and circumstances for change will have much to do with what happens next.

When leaders make a compelling case for the need to change, people will choose a path. Change for people is a change about choice.

Choice is the key, and for the leader change is about pull, it is not about push or shove.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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compelling workplace opportunities

Creating Compelling Workplace Opportunities

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Are the employee teams at your workplace motivated? Would you describe their behavior as energized, engaged, and passionate? What are you doing to create compelling workplace opportunities?

One common truth is, not everyone is motivated in the same manner. Their interests, values, and beliefs may spark engagement, or may have them heading for the door.

What are the attraction points in your workplace? What gets people engaged and moving?

It won’t take long for the idea of money to arouse attention. Certainly, inspirational stories sometimes have value. What will really stick?

Compelling Workplace Opportunities

Here are a few simple things to think about:

Appreciation. It is really this simple, people don’t like to be criticized. Observe what they are working hard at, when they are trying their best, and show more appreciation.

Accomplishment. Sometimes people are inspired by finishing the job. Have you ever said, “That’s a good job done.” Many people take pride in finishing, it is an accomplishment.

Problem Solving. Although connected to a pro and a con, problem solving is a great skill to possess. Be cautious of being overly critical as you point out problems (con), yet at the same time effectively utilize the people who love to solve them (pro).

Change. Some people are motivated for change, others shutter at the whisper of the word. The truth is that some people really don’t like risk, while others thrive on it. Find balance in the energy of risk. Help teams actualize the vision.

Competition. Comparisons can sometimes feel depressing, yet competition will often spark motivation. Manage observations of competition by starting with competing against your own past performance, then work up to surpassing the competition.

Be More Compelling

Compelling is always better than force or fear. Yes, you can force people into action by causing fear, however, force and fear won’t help you with the long-run game.

Yes, accountability matters and it is sometimes the missing link. Keep in mind though, pull is better than push.

Are you in this for the short-run or the long-run?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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building workplace interest

Building Workplace Interest and Engagement

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Are you seeking more engagement from your workplace teams? Are you building workplace interest or just rolling through each day?

Things only roll one way, downhill.

Choice of Engagement

Looking at my well used desktop keyboard, I notice that many keys are polished, some even missing the letter representation. Yet there is an entire row of shortcut keys that I have never touched.

Recently, I drove a friend to lunch. He complimented my car. I mentioned that it is just short of ten years old. He thought it was newer. Later I realized that in nearly ten years I’ve never explored all the electronic features.

There are millions of groups on social media channels. Business or pleasure, hobbies or special interests, yet millions of users never engage.

Some people never take public transportation. Some never go to the visitor attractions in their own town.

Why?

Engagement at Work

In the workplace we have similar attention challenges. There is talk about change, what will work better, and how to have less waste.

Yet, many will never engage.

They’ll never touch the shortcut keys, they’ll never check out all the features, and they’ll never get involved in optional groups.

Building Workplace Interest

Workplace leaders often try to push. They use polite forms of force to apply pressure for engagement. Backs turned, there is often little or no interest in doing anything new or different.

The challenge does not involve pushing harder. The challenge is creating a compelling environment where the people are pulled. When you gain more true followers there is more reason to join the movement.

The word spreads. The features work, they make life easier, and the engagement keeps paying off.

Engagement by force is a short-run game.

Building more interest feels harder than applying force. It requires careful thought, effort, and transparency. The risk is different, bad ideas don’t sell.

Illustrating why is much more powerful than commanding why.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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compelling ideas

Will Compelling Ideas Cause a Shift?

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There are lots of ideas floating around. Easily, more ideas than there is action. The hesitation, fear, and lack of action doesn’t help new ideas grow. Are you delivering compelling ideas? Ideas that are sticky and gain momentum?

Jump on The Box

For some people it is easy to get on the soap box. Hold up a cue card (metaphorically) and someone will jump on their box.

Once on the box, listeners sense the urgency, passion, and may be compelled to jump on board with the idea. They may also find disagreement and want to argue.

The challenge then for the soap box stander is to not only be compelling but also to be charismatic. It is similar to an election. Candidates get on the box. It is the stump speech.

How does this apply in the workplace?

It happens every day. Someone has a chance or the opportunity to get on the box. The messages that we exchange and engage with in the workplace are often followed by action and belief, or not.

Recently, at a speaking engagement someone asked me, “How do you teach up the ladder, get executives involved, and gain buy-in?” I thought the answer was easy, I responded with, “You have to be compelling.”

Compelling Ideas

I love the opportunity to get on the box. Sometimes I have to reel myself back in before I take things too far. Change is often about small doses of a good idea, spread across time. The big picture is just too much, too soon.

Like the closet that needs cleaning, it is easier to do in pieces. When we open the door and see so much clutter, we just don’t know where to start. So, we do nothing except close the door again.

The shift that you want to make may be a good idea. You’ll have to be compelling and maybe a little charismatic. Use the right speed and quantity.

Too much, too soon, and you may end up with the perception that it is a bad idea. Door closed.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace effort

Is It About Workplace Effort or Workplace Change?

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“Baby Boomers refuse to change. Millennials only want it their way and expect things handed to them.” Common statements, are they true? Is it about workplace effort or is it more about workplace change?

It is a popular stereotype that traditionals and baby boomers don’t like change. At the same time, similar yet opposite stereotypes are often given to millennials and Gen Z. (Generations Chart.)

Workplace Change

The truth is, adversity to change is a commonality across the generations, not a difference. Tell anyone that they need to change or that their job role is about to change you’ll likely face some immediate concern.

Change breaks that comfort zone for everyone. It makes people of all ages uneasy, nervous, and afraid. It may be very short lived, or it may continue for some time.

However, the argument that change is more difficult for those who are more seasoned may have some truth.

In many cases, but not all, the longer we do something that appears to work, the more convinced we become in the method. It may also be that we don’t like the feeling of the unknown, the feeling of effort required, and the admittance of, “I don’t know how.”

Workplace Effort

Change requires new learning, new patterns of behavior, and it requires giving up something to make room for something different. It takes effort.

As a little kid we may resist learning to tie our shoes, ride a bike, or even perform chores. Of course, at some point, for most, we desire to be more grown up and we commit to learning. Effort is part of the process.

Does an 85-year old feel any need to learn to use the latest smartphone? Do they want to learn how to play the latest video game? Perhaps they don’t see a strong connection with how this impacts their future.

The change required in our workplace isn’t really about age. It is about perceived effort compared with impact. We ask ourselves, “Is this worth it?”

Change feels worth the effort when the reason is compelling.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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