Tag Archives: motivation

  • 0
Dennis Gilbert

Webinar : Creating a Motivational Climate

Tags : 

Webinar: Creating a Motivational Climate

Starts in:

 

Positive reinforcement is powerful. It’s more powerful than punitive actions or behaviors that zap energy and create divides among team members. Workplace leaders are serving as role models, sometimes when they don’t even realize it. Properly driving motivation and inspiration can refresh teams and build a high-energy culture. This program will help participants connect with the elements necessary to inspire team motivation and spread that energy across departments creating a stronger commitment with a mission-centered purpose.

 

Dennis E Gilbert

 

This two-hour webinar-style event will help you:

  • Learn more about intrinsic and extrinsic motivation factors and how to put them to work for your workplace culture
  • Better understand motivation styles and how to energize sluggish performers
  • Build on engagement principles and avoid being labeled as an over-bearing taskmaster
  • Develop awareness of communication signals that you send and reengage disconnected team members
  • Increase team morale and improve group cohesion

Where: From your own device. For best results, you’ll utilize a webcam-type device (w/microphone and speakers) to connect to the seminar. 

When: June 8, 2021, starting promptly at 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM  (Eastern U.S. timezone) 2-hour session. (Log on ten minutes early!)

Who: This seminar is appropriate for team leaders, committee leaders, supervisors, managers, directors, and executives. Anyone with the responsibility to lead or manage the work, productivity, and motivation of employee teams.

 

What past participants are saying:

“The Creating a Motivational Climate webinar was great! I’ve attended quite a few seminars across the years and this one really resonated with me. It surprised me and what I took away from it. I know is going to make a big difference.”

Lori Ofner, Senior Director of Human Resources, RCN

 

“The Creating a Motivational Climate program helped me identify the factors that motivate my team and learned ways to engage my employees. This program has made a positive impact on my business.” 

Elizabeth A. Turner, G.M., Peckville Self Storage

 

“This program was more than I expected. The Leadership Engagement Principles we explored as part of the program will help me to make a big impact with our team.” 

Sherry Paulhamus, Production Administrator, (Gas & Oil Sector) 

 

 

Excellent webinar for both in-person and remotely managed teams.

This virtual (Zoom) seminar will be presented by business consultant and national level speaker, Dennis Gilbert.

Dennis Gilbert

“I delivered my first live, online virtual training program in 2009. Much changed since then, and the content and delivery is now better than ever. Make no mistake, this program is not a freebie teaser. It is a specially developed live virtual training (webinar) that is jam-packed with tips, techniques, and most of all, value.” – Dennis

 

Cost: $149 $99 per participant.

 

 Early Bird Rate ends, May 19, 2021, at 11:59 PM

Early Bird Rate $99

Register now for $99 $149

Register Now

Thanks for looking and for supporting small businesses!


  • -
sharing motivation

Sharing Motivation Might Be Different Than You Think

Tags : 

Are you in the habit of sharing motivation? In other words, when you see something that motivates you, do you extend your hand in an attempt to inspire others? Does it work?

You can start with some questions? What gets you pumped up? What energizes you, springs you to action, and keeps you going even during extreme challenges?

Golden Rule and Music

Many people live by the golden rule. It’s actually very much appreciated by most people. It seems to make sense.

In essence, treat others as you would like to be treated.

That converts to, if this would motivate me, I’ll use that as a tool to motivate others.

Does this work? Sometimes.

The golden rule applied to motivation often runs out of steam quickly. Different people are motivated in different ways.

Some people claim that music motivates them. Cranking out a little Eminem might motivate some, but it probably won’t really be a hit with those who have Elevation Worship near the top of their playlist.

That’s okay. It just means that the inspiration or motivation comes from different places or styles. It may also be conditioned by values and beliefs. The theory that music motivates might be a good one, the same genre might not.

Whether it is music, sunshine, or a little friendly competition, what motivates one, won’t motivate all.

Sharing Motivation

People are motivated intrinsically or extrinsically. In a general sense, most people are some of both, yet they tend to favor one side or the other.

When it comes to the workplace and job performance it is always important to consider the motivational factors of the people. An extended hand for a path is quite a bit different from a forced hand.

Can you force motivation? Sure, but you may not like the long-term results. Forcing motivation happens by creating fear. Fear springs people to action but the long-term consequences seldom make it worthwhile.

Perhaps you need to tweak your mindset to searching for what motivates others rather than assuming what motivates you should work for everyone?

It is an easy trap to fall into.

There are plenty of ways to figure out what gets others moving. You may want to start by asking them. Which by the way, don’t be fooled by the money motivator response.

Money is the means to an end for most people. Support my family, buy a car, pay the rent, get groceries. The motivator is often something different from the end result.

-DEG

Need some help with workplace motivation? This virtual training seminar may be for you, Creating a Motivational Climate.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
communication bombs

Communication Bombs Are a Short-Run Game

Tags : 

Do you drop the bad news and run? What about showing the graph in a PowerPoint and creating fear, confusion, or anxiety? Are communication bombs part of your strategy?

It may not always be intentional. In fact, it may be an attempt to increase motivation. The question is, does it work?

What Kind of Motivation?

Make no mistake that fear motivates many people to action. There are a lot of employees going to jobs every day because they fear for the welfare of their family.

In other words, they need a paycheck.

Yet many people wish for something more than just that check.

Certainly, the check matters and means a lot. However, contributing to something, creating something, serving someone, or working as a team has many benefits beyond the paycheck.

In the workplace, motivation through fear is a short-run game. Long term it tends to divide teams. Often it creates an “us versus them” situation. Organizational leaders are on one side, and front-line employees are on the other.

Communication bombs may confuse, frustrate, or simply be a bad tactic for attempting to achieve a result.

Get this finished before the end of the day.

If you disagree, there is the door.

This chart shows last quarter results, another quarter like this and we’ll all be looking for jobs.

Communication bombs. Drop them and run.

Is this effective?

Deploying Communication Bombs

There may be truth in the intent. It may even spark action and accomplish something.

Is it what you desire?

You have a reputation. Your department and team have a reputation. The business or organization you work for also has a reputation.

Reputations are shared. They’re publicized in conversations everyday.

Drop and run is a good way to hide from facing the real issues at hand.

The executive sometimes only wants results. The employee often wants respect and to be part of something more than just their paycheck.

Leadership and culture live or die through communication.

Long-term everyone has choice.

Short-run games end sooner than you think.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
Competitive motivation

Competitive Motivation Keeps Things Rolling

Tags : 

Selling is often considering to be about winning. Convincing another party to exchange money for a good or service. It’s commerce. Do you believe in competitive motivation?

McDonald’s and Burger King might have something going on. Don’t forget about Wendy’s and Carl’s Jr., they have a few things in common. Then there is Domino’s, Papa John’s, and Marco’s Pizza.

Businesses who are front runners tend to not like the threat of another player. New players like chasing the front runner.

Could there be some motivation hidden here?

When the football, baseball, or soccer teams hit the field we recognize both are out to win, and only one will. Any kind of tie feels better than a loss, but it is still not a win. It makes overtime even more attractive.

The idea of winning is inspirational. It’s motivational.

Competition may not always be people or businesses.

Competition can be about numbers, metrics, or a system.

Employee teams can aspire to beat the previous record, exceed goal, or overcome a distinct disadvantage.

What we focus on is what we get.

Competitive Motivation

There are some interesting aspects connected to the motivation created by competition. One such aspect is that when the competition knows you’re watching it may give them an advantage.

It may bring about decoy’s, the threat of exposed trade secrets, or espionage.

It could also start a war for talent. Bring on non-compete clauses, wage hikes, and package deals.

How do you size up competitive motivation?

Chances are good that it is keeping you moving.

Roll on.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
best starts

Best Starts Come From Where You Are At

Tags : 

Seed money is nice. It gives you a better chance for a stronger start. A head start in the foot race might be nice too. Realistically, the best starts come from recognizing where you are at and getting to where you are going.

Small and large businesses alike spend much energy and resources on carefully crafting their mission and vision. Then they build a brand around it.

It should be true for successful professionals too.

What is your mission? What is your vision?

People often want to highlight the disadvantages. They may not have strengths in certain areas, or what they want to do may not exactly fit with what they need to do.

Great Visualizers

The best athletes visualize their success. They visualize the perfect dive and stroke in swimming. The perfect swing in baseball or golf. And for the track athlete, it’s getting off the blocks perfectly.

Many people talk about great starts. Great starts matter. They’re also conditioned on starting where you are at. In other words, everyone has an individual starting point. Amateurs can’t expect to start at the Pro level.

Visualizing where you are at and where you want to go may lead to a good start.

Where do you belief the best starts come from?

Best Starts

For everyone, in your business or in your career, you have to start at the beginning. Where ever the beginning is for you, that’s where you start.

You can’t expect to start at the top. You can’t expect a head start.

Know and understand your mission. Have a stretchy, yet appropriate vision. Consider things will need a certain amount of fluidity. Not everything is carved in stone, nor is it black and white.

Best starts come from where you are at. They follow your mission and vision.

You’ll get better along the way.

Get started.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
workforce push back

Workforce Push Back And The Quest For More

Tags : 

Has workforce push back ever disrupted the flow in your organization? Does the quest for more ever end up becoming a quest that results in less?

Balance is an interesting aspect of the work we do. The push versus pull, the give versus take. It often comes down to finding the appropriate balance.

Concept of Balance

The idea of balance is something often discussed in leadership development programs. Conceptually, it may be evidence of what many would identify as situational leadership. It is inclusive of those circumstances or situations where one leadership principle is sacrificed in order to gain more of another.

In the seminar, workshop, or webinar, some people get their fill before time is up, others don’t want the moment to end. Some are listening carefully and learning something they haven’t heard before, and yet others believe that they know the concept well.

The facilitator, instructor, or host, has a duty then. A duty to produce something in the middle. The middle is where you’ll satisfy the most.

The Expectation of Give More

We find the same thing when leading workforce teams.

The business or organization is always striving for the most productivity, highest efficiency, and the greatest customer satisfaction. The expectation is to give more. More effort, more time, or more commitment.

Sometimes this seems counter intuitive since the labor force pushes back to not allow management to gain too much.

The labor force may be organized, informal, or part of a clique. Their push back message masquerades as fairness, yet the course of doing business may feel different. It seems like it is about giving more.

At the farmers market or the mom and pop bakery, a customer seeks a farmers or bakers dozen. Only, a dozen doesn’t mean twelve, it means thirteen. The concept is about give more.

The restaurant owner works hard to build a brand. Much of the front-line staff receive compensation based on tips. Customers provide greater tips when they are satisfied or impressed. It is the expectation of management, a concept of give more.

Workforce Push Back

In workforce circles, or any circle for that matter, there is always some push back. There is the quest for balance, the small tug of war, and one side gains while another side gives.

Somewhere in the middle is the happy medium. That place where at least for this moment, everyone is moving the same direction.

The quest for more should be simple.

It develops from a motivational cause, not a rule, not a specific metric, and certainly not by pushing.

Wanting more and giving more is always about balance.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • 2
Inspired employees

Inspired Employees Stand Out In a Crowd

Tags : 

Look around you, do you see inspired employees? While there may be varying degrees of inspiration or motivation how would you size things up?

There are lots of paths that lead to inspiration and motivation. One sometimes challenging aspect is that people are motivated for different reasons.

Fear can motivate, although this is almost never a good idea. Money often becomes a discussion point, yet it seldom has lasting effects.

Are you naturally motivated or can you be inspired?

Here is another question to ponder, “Are leaders born, or are they made?”

I’m hopeful that you believe there are paths to more motivation and inspiration. I’m also hopeful that you believe leadership can be developed and is not just a natural talent.

Natural Talents and Abilities

Are you born with certain talents?

Perhaps it is a talent for music, for art, or for certain athletic abilities.

It may go other directions too.

You may have a talent or connection to mathematical problems, architecture, or be identified as a good book keeper. In still other ways perhaps you are mechanically inclined, exceptional with trade skills, or an incredible cook.

Do you have natural talents, or do you have skills that have been developed across time?

A good answer is perhaps, “Both.”

Developing Talent and Skills

The greatest talents often become recognized because those people work countless hours toward perfecting their craft.

You may be great with numbers, yet if you seldom exercise this capability, in a crowd you may be mediocre at best.

Perhaps you are a fast runner, or can run long distances. If you seldom run, you’ll likely be beat by someone with less natural ability.

Are you or your employee teams inspired to do more?

Inspired Employees

The key for everyone as an individual is to practice honing your craft. You must go all in, be dedicated and committed, and live up to what you are capable of delivering.

Abraham Maslow introduced us to the concept of self-actualization.

Are you all in, one-hundred percent?

When you go all in, and have the drive and determination to go all out, you may find yourself at the pinnacle of talent and skill.

Halfhearted won’t get you very far.

Especially if there is a crowd.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
workplace heroes

Workplace Heroes Can Leap Tall Objects

Tags : 

People spend enormous amounts of time waiting. Waiting for a change in the weather, waiting for their accumulated vacation, and often, waiting for workplace heroes to take charge.

Instead of waiting you always have an option. The option is for action.

Nearly every axis, of every chart, has a relevant coordinate or scale for time. Time is the universal metric.

How many donuts can be made per hour?

How many customers served this month?

What does sales revenue look like this quarter?

And so, some choose to wait. They wait to see. They wait to see if the superhero will appear.

Waiting for Superheroes

It is often because people are conditioned to wait.

They wait for an answer from the boss, wait until the next meeting to bring up the problem, or wait for the customer to appear.

The truth is that it may be your responsibility for taking action, not waiting.

What happens next in your workplace is driven by culture.

Your organizational culture is created by many gestures, acts, and behaviors. Add them all up, across time, and you’ll have the vibe and pulse of the organization.

Who are the superheroes?

Workplace Heroes

Perhaps it is your next action that will create something magical. It will make the difference to leap over the obstacle or start a movement that inspires someone else to do so.

Superman may have changed his clothes in a phone booth before activating his super powers.

You don’t have to.

You just have to stop waiting.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
workplace confidence

Workplace Confidence and the Reality Shared

Tags : 

After some time, you get confidently comfortable with your job and skills. Is workplace confidence distracting you from doing your best work?

There is often a discussion about over-confident in comparison with being under-confident.

Confidence is Good, Right?

People often size up a lack of confidence and believe that more confidence should be gained. A good idea.

On the other end of the continuum people are working with limited stress or worry about their performance. The belief is, “I know everything I need to know.” They start each day by just gently flowing into their work.

If asked, they’ll suggest that they are doing their best. Giving what they can give and that they are devoted and loyal employees.

What if the impression of doing your best isn’t really your best?

What if you are holding back a little? Perhaps you are saving some energy for your run at lunch time. Maybe you have a painting project at home and you’re distracting about finishing it before the in-laws visit next week.

It goes deeper sometimes.

What if you consider that if you really gave it your all today, and succeeded, that you’ll have to put out that kind of work every day. Better hold back a little.

Workplace Confidence

One thing that everyone in the workplace shares is the reality that on many days they are operating at something less than one-hundred percent.

Initially, you’ll challenge that notion. Upon deeper inspection you may agree that it is true.

It is rooted in our level of confidence and comfort. Total confidence may mean that there is more left in the tank. More room for learning, growing, or helping someone else succeed.

As humans our nature is to leave a little in the tank.

We’re saving it for when it really matters.

Maybe today is one of those days.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
another candidate

Sorry, We Selected Another Candidate.

Tags : 

Many people have heard these words, “Sorry, we selected another candidate.” The truth is, more people hear these words when compared with, “You’re hired!”

Jobs advertisements are everywhere. Hundreds and thousands of people applying. Often there is only one position, maybe two, to be filled.

Therefore, it is safe to say that most people won’t get the job. It is also true for the promotion.

Selected Another Candidate

Those applying often think about what it will feel like, how their family and friends will respond, and that satisfactory feeling of being chosen. There are opportunities that might change your life, your standard of living, or your ability to provide something more for your family.

All of it is often washed away in the moment you get the news.

Being the successful candidate means you’ve won. For the unsuccessful it is a loss.

That is exactly why it is so important to consider how you will navigate your loss. Will you blame someone else? Will you retreat back in to your shell and never take the chance again?

You certainly don’t want to create a self-fulfilled prophecy to lose, yet the statistics are almost never in your favor.

Navigating with Grace

Preparing to lose gracefully will create more opportunity. Being unprepared and losing without grace does not.

Remember all the basics. Reflect on what you’ve learned, what you can improve upon, and focus on how you might make some future changes.

Most of all, remember that persistence is enemy of complacency. Slowing down or doing nothing won’t help. You can’t coast because you’ll never coast uphill, only down.

Enter to win. If you don’t, be sure to lose with grace, dignity, and style.

Your next opportunity is waiting.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


Search This Website

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Upcoming Public Events

  1. Aspiring Leader Seminar – Virtual Training

    May 13 @ 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
  2. Webinar : Creating a Motivational Climate

    June 8 @ 9:00 am - 11:00 am

Blog (Filter) Categories

Follow me on Twitter

Assessment Services and Tools

Strategic, Competency, or Needs Assessments, DiSC Assessments, 360 Feedback, and more. Learn more