Tag Archives: leadership

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bloomsburg university

Management and Leadership Certificate

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This Management and Leadership Certificate program is being brought to you by a special partnership between Bloomsburg University and the Columbia Montour Chamber of Commerce.

Dennis Gilbert, is serving as the instructor/facilitator for this series.

This five-module series is designed to help participants develop and sharpen skills that relate to leading in today’s workplace environment. It is appropriate for existing workplace leaders, managers, and supervisors; or those who are new or emerging.

Throughout the series, each module will provide specific learning objectives and will be delivered by a subject matter expert who will utilize a pleasing combination of lecture, experiential learning activities and exercises, and real-world examples.

Professional course materials will be provided and will include assessments, activities, and other learning enhancement components to help each participant individualize their learning experience.

The five, three-hour modules are:

  1. Supervisor Effectiveness
  2. Effective Communication for Managers
  3. Conflict Management
  4. Navigating a Multigenerational Workforce
  5. Being a Great Mentor or Coach

Sharpening management skills and your leadership presence are valuable for navigating today’s workforce. This series will help you prepare and improve your role as a leader.

This program is scheduled as follows:

September 17th

October 1st

October 15th

October 29th

November 12th

Currently it is set as a half-day program to begin at 10:00 AM and end at 2:00 PM.

To submit an application to participate or to get more information please contact:  Deb Thomas at Bloomsburg University by calling 570-389-5162.

This program qualifies for WEDnetPA grant funding (for eligible businesses). For additional information please contact: Jennifer Williams at Bloomsburg University by calling 570-389-4004.

More Details

 

Columbia Montour Chamber

bloomsburg university


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Workplace Energy, What Are You Bringing?

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We have choices about everything. What are you bringing to work today? Are you bringing workplace energy or merely just trying to lay low and get through the day?

Many organization leaders blame the individuals. They believe motivation is intrinsic, you either have it, or you don’t. When it comes to workplace energy, they just leave it up to the employees to decide.

Energy of Culture

It may be true that at some level our motivation is intrinsic and it may also be true that each individual has responsibility for what they’ll bring. Does organization leadership have a bigger role?

Chances are good that leadership does play a role. Leaders drive culture. Culture has a direct impact on the performance, attitudes, and even the environment that employees walk into each day.

What do you do?

Workplace Energy

Are you bringing more to your workplace? Are you striving hard, working smart, and staying engaged?

Do you seek to create a bigger impact, be responsible and accountable, and help to stimulate a positive climate?

Some people will try to lay low. Stay out of other more assertive workers way, and watch the clock.

Others will insist that their performance and contribution is industrialized and systematic.

They have set the expectation, lubed the wheels and gears, and have made sure things are efficient. As a result, they can merely arrive and monitor. Anything outside of the established parameters and they’ll take action. Otherwise, it is just roll along and collect the paycheck.

It is a decision you make.

Workplace energy is contagious. Low energy and low output is as contagious as the opposite.

High energy contribution takes more guts. Be the role model you know you should be.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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modern artful leadership

Modern Artful Leadership Is Different

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Leadership is less pragmatic, less technical, and less authoritarian than it ever has been. Are you demonstrating modern artful leadership?

We all know that leadership is not about a position. At least, not specifically about a position. Leadership is for everyone, with or without direct reports.

Many workplaces struggle with navigating the workforce generations, they also struggle with culture, on-boarding, and employee retention. Much of this is about organization leadership and effective communication.

Less Authority, More Art

Not so long-ago leadership for many meant power and authority. It was the significance of the formal position within the organization that designated the chain-of-command.

The chain of command is still valid in many organization cultures, yet its purpose or utilization is often softer with fuzzy edges, dotted lines, and open doors.

It is not your great grandfathers, or your great, great grandfather’s industrial revolution anymore. The authoritarian approach is seldom effective.

There are pockets of businesses and small communities that still have traces of this. To find this you usually have to get deep into the rural areas, miles from any metropolitan statistical area. There, the workplace choices are few and the leadership style may not be modern.

For everyone else, leadership is as much artful as it is pragmatic.

What is your style?

Modern Artful Leadership

Great leaders inspire a call-to-action that keeps people motivated and engaged.

They co-create a culture of community where employees feel like they are part of something, they are building it, growing it, and giving it life. The result is that they have purpose in their work and are proud of the products and services they provide.

Authority matters less, respect across all job functions, all generations, and all workforce classes (considered protected or not) matter more.

Modern artful leadership is not pointed to on paper. It is not designated by a job description, the organization chart, or tenure.

Yes, all of those things matter, and in deadlock decisions or strategic moves, they are the tie-breaker. They are not the everyday practice of how work gets accomplished.

What about you, are you a good role model?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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leadership work

Leadership Work And What Many Avoid

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Do you like the idea of leadership? Does it get you motivated and positively fired up when you think about leading others? Leadership work may not be as easy or pain free as you think.

Leadership seems really attractive on the surface. Being the boss, having people look up to you, getting the recognition for team accomplishments. Some will quickly jump to the idea of increased pay. These and other aspects attract many.

Certainly, leadership is for everyone. Things like money and fame are not a requirement. Neither is having formal authority, yet it is often assumed.

Work Avoided

Workplace professionals will often mention to me that they dislike dealing with people issues. This is a significant part of leadership. It is not just about a title or some fame and glory, no matter how big or how small.

Leadership is people work. If you have formal authority, such as having direct reports, it means dealing with job performance, hiring, and sometimes firing.

Many so-called leaders don’t like that part. They don’t like the responsibility of managing others. As a result, they tend to avoid the people issues.

Others just hand out commands with great expectations. Reality is often in question.

This is exactly how we get what people often label, “poor leadership.”

Leadership Work

Leadership work takes guts, determination, and a commitment to excellence. It means doing the things that many others don’t like doing. It means working with people, not a dictatorship or authoritarian approach.

If you think leadership means you’re the boss and you tell others what to do, you are mostly wrong.

The true work of great leaders is as much artful as it is pragmatic.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace presence

Workplace Presence Is Required To Get Started

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Does everyone show up for the meeting? Are some people occupying seats but their intellectual presence is questionable? Workplace presence is where it all begins.

It seems there is always some question if the right people are at the meeting. Sometimes there are too many, other times too few. Meeting effectiveness is critical. Your presence may make a difference.

Right Approach

The authoritarian approach seldom works in today’s society. Commanding performance is much less effective when compared with inspiring performance.

The seats are often occupied, but are the people present?

When the truth is known, much of what happens in the workplace depends on leadership and culture. When leaders are really present, things will happen. If they are not, much less will happen.

This doesn’t always mean the formal boss. This means people who are leading. Leading the meetings, setting the course, and navigating the tough spots. Presence is required.

Workplace Presence

Presence helps you actualize the vision which typically happens when you create compelling opportunities.

Taking initiative is important. Taking the right initiative is even more important. Workplace leaders help steer and navigate everything that happens, or everything that doesn’t.

Goals and objectives are accomplished by tactics. Tactics are how strategy is executed.

What is happening at your meetings? Are the right people attending the right meetings? Are the meetings effective or are they unproductive and energy zapping?

If you’re in the meeting then you have a responsibility to lead. If you called the meeting, that responsibility is even greater.

Make sure you do more than just show up.

Arrive.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace favors

Asking For Workplace Favors Has Limitations

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Have you ever needed a hand? Have you asked for help or asked an employee to do something appropriately professional, yet not in their job description? Do you believe that asking for workplace favors has limitations?

You probably should.

Wells Run Dry

A free drink refill at your favorite restaurant may not be a bottomless opportunity.

Asking your neighbor to hold the garage door while you install a new screw isn’t acceptable every day.

Expecting employees to work late or come in on their scheduled day off should be something less than the norm.

Sometimes, enough is enough. There probably are limitations.

The limitations that guide us are based on our expectations. The measurement that guides the expectation is often based on our individual values and beliefs.

Hence the story, “I walked 10 miles, uphill, in the snow, to school when I was a kid. Both ways!”

Society has insisted on showing us that values and beliefs are not universal.

Workplace Favors

There are plenty of fully performing employees who just want to work their shift and go home. If you are in a leadership role in the organization you may desire to work extra hours, even when you’re salaried. That doesn’t always mean that your expectation should be the same for others.

There is a race to the top and a race to the bottom. Expecting the performance and beliefs that propelled you up the ladder to be delivered by the average fully performing employee may be a big mistake.

Delivering on respect and being committed to workplace relationships are vital competences for today’s leader. They guide the organizational culture.

Going to the well too many times is never a good idea. A race to the bottom often starts as the well begins to run dry.

Don’t expect too many favors.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace winning

Workplace Winning Costs, But How Much?

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A little friendly competition isn’t bad. It certainly can motivate and inspire. The spirit of competition is strong, it can create a lot of action. Workplace winning can cost a lot too. Have you assessed the price tag?

Friendly Competition

Set the goals. Feel the stretch. Size up the competition. Plan to win.

There are a few ways your workplace can become competitive.

The top salesperson.

Employee of the month.

The quest for recognition and illustrated appreciation.

Debates in meetings.

Pay by merit, not seniority or credentials.

Does your workplace support one or more of these motivational drivers? Internal competition is often friendly, yet it can also derail.

Mediocrity

Some people will defer instead of compete. They will take a lose-win approach. Their mindset is, “I’m not going to win so I’ll make an excuse and lose.”

She has all the good accounts.

Bob is a workplace version of the teacher’s pet.

No one ever really observes my work; they don’t understand my contribution.

I’m not a quick thinker. I refuse to debate issues.

Jack has been here longer he should have a higher pay rate.

These are most likely opinionated excuses, not facts. When we set ourselves up to lose there is not any reason to do more or be more. Couple that with limited accountability by a supervisor and at best you have mediocrity.

Workplace Winning

The workplace winning continuum is broad. Mediocrity may mean complacency. On the other end of the scale inappropriate competition and the quest to win can derail team trust and commitment.

Both represent costs no organization can afford to pay.

Properly structured, internal competition can be a great morale booster. Strong teams win the prize. It is a win-win. The organization wins and so do the employees. Customers often win too.

This means one simple truth. The win is counterintuitive and expensive. A win-win-win is what you should seek.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace ethics

Workplace Ethics and the Perceptions of Employees

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Perceptions drive expectations, and expectations serve as the measuring stick of fulfillment. What is expected is both the frame and the goal. In matters of workplace ethics who decides the framework of expectations?

Ethical considerations are often quickly connected to the inappropriate shortcut, the sneaky cheaty perception of cutting corners, side deals, or even stealing. What are your ethical boundaries? What is tolerated or welcomed as acceptable in your workplace?

Decisions and Choices

The part-time assistant in the pizza shop may feel entitled to a slice at the end of his or her shift. Is that ethical?

A ream of paper from the office for your home computer so the kids can print stuff out. Is that ethical?

The company car, used for a family vacation. Is that ethical?

In many cases, your first response may be, “It depends.” If so, it depends on what? If others are doing it or if the circumstances surrounding the consumption or use seem to be permitted? Has it always been done this way?

Workplace Ethics

People are often willing to take shortcuts, or use or borrow something that does not belong to them. A popular mindset is that this ethical infringement is owed.

I worked hard during my shift so I get a free slice of pizza at the end.

Perfectly fine if this is a formal agreement as part of the compensation. Sneaking it while no one is looking may be a different story.

Boundaries exist, especially in ethics. A boundary broken may be viewed as a way to move ahead. A cheat, a steal, and against the law.

When someone is willing to cheat a little, will they cheat a lot? Is there a measurement for the allowable size of cheat? Is that the framework for ethics?

You may say, “It depends.”

The ethical question then becomes, “Does it?”

What is your perception?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Penn State Smeal

Management Essentials – Lewistown, PA

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Dennis is headed to Lewistown, PA with PennState Smeal College of Business and Penn State Executive Programs to deliver this valuable professional development program.

 

This five-module series is designed to help participants develop and sharpen skills that relate to managing in today’s workplace environment. Throughout the series, each module will provide specific learning objectives, experiential learning activities and exercises, and real-world examples.

This program is appropriate for new first-level supervisors, individual contributors, or team leads who are considering the transition into supervision, as well as experienced supervisors who would like to refresh their skills.

Sample job titles include manager, supervisor, coordinator, superintendent, and team lead.

Five Modules all (8:30 AM arrival) 9:00 AM – 12 Noon

May 23, 2019 – Supervisor Effectiveness

May 30, 2019 – Effective Communication for Managers

June 5, 2019 – Conflict Management for Managers

June 12, 2019 – Navigating a Multigenerational Workforce

June 19, 2019 – Being a Great Mentor or Coach

$495.00 (for the 5 module series)

Register Now!

Or Call: 800-311-6364

Penn State Smeal


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Dennis Gilbert Aspiring Leader Seminar

Aspiring Leader Seminar – Williamsport, PA

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Today’s leaders are more than just supervisors or management team members. They are the heart of inspiration, team work, and create the atmosphere required for the pursuit of common goals.

This seminar covers many of the foundation skills that build great leadership habits. Participants will explore what it means to be a leader, not just a supervisor or manager. We’ll be covering change, communication, and motivating the team. Tough topics that are sometimes taken for granted such as resiliency, understanding priorities, and the difference between facts and opinions. In addition, we’ll examine some tough questions such as, “Where are you most vulnerable?”and “What is most important right now?” 

More Info / Register


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