Tag Archives: values

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World view

Worldview, How Do You View It?

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What is your worldview? I’m not talking politics or weather, even though both may apply. In your workplace does your worldview change results?

You may need to make a decision. You may need to support a decision. Can you roll with a different path, even if you have some reservations or lack agreement?

What about doing the right thing? Is your view of the right thing consistent with your team or your boss?

Your life experiences are unique. How you see the world will condition your thoughts and behaviors. It will even condition what you decide to do next.

Is your view helpful or a hindrance?

Worldview

Your view can be helpful. It can serve as a difference maker.

When you share your story and you are authentic it might be attractive. It might sell.

Stories of being the victim, only having bad luck, and tales of others beating the system or having an advantage that you’ll never have aren’t flattering. They are also selling the wrong attitude. They are a hindrance.

Stories that overcome obstacles, leap hurdles and illustrate persistence are difference makers. Positive difference makers.

Consider stories that rise above the competition, stories that link mindset to product or services, and stories that warm hearts and build community.

Generous stories. Stories that give more than they take. Stories with connection and purpose. Thought starters and movers and shakers.

Your world view is about heart. It’s about what’s inside that needs to get out to inspire others.

It starts with you. It changes the way others see things.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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changing generations

Changing Generations, Is It Happening All-Around You?

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One generation stopping and another generation starting, is this about age? Not really, it is more about a collection of values and beliefs. Changing generations is like a scene from Snowpiercer, it never stops.

Adults born around the year 2000, have something to remember. The COVID-19 pandemic. It will go down in history as a significant life changing event.

Fewer and fewer people are alive today to remember the pain of the Great Depression in the early 1930s. In fact, many old enough to have experienced it first hand have passed. There are other events, such as times of War, a moon landing, an assassinated United States President, a Space Shuttle explosion, and the day the twin towers in New York City fell.

When you talk about anything prior to 2000, it occurred in the last century. Forty-year old’s have lived one-half of their life in the 20th century and to-date, the second half of their life in the 21st century.

Your values and beliefs are shaped by life experiences. It includes everything from the music you listen to, to how you make your coffee.

Nothing will stop what many people consider progress.

Changing Generations

It isn’t always viewed as progress to everyone. Some people desire the ways of the past. Many consider the ways of the past to be simpler, not so complex, and based more on needs instead of extravagant wants.

People work each day, or at least about five days per week. Some work from home, some in an office, and others in a production facility, a hospital, on the highway, a farm, or at a school.

During their work they face challenges, serve customers, and encounter differences in personal beliefs.

Some will argue that people who have lived longer are resistant to change. At the same time, those attempting to slow down change or stop it might actually represent an instance of change.

If you believe that everything is changing, you are not alone. Acceptance of change may be required but perhaps we need to evaluate how far we’ve come.

How far have we shifted from the essentials to luxury? Too far, or not far enough?

When you think about change it may be valuable to think about your own personal contributions.

You are part of change and at some level you still have choice.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace windows

Workplace Windows and What You See

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How does the World appear to you? What about your job, how does that appear? We all see our working environment through workplace windows.

For nearly everything in life what you experience as an individual is somewhat different when compared with another individual. Life experiences have a way of making it different for everyone. Values and beliefs play a role, whether they are confirmed or denied.

It’s true for families. One family has a set of holiday or seasonal traditions and another family has something different.

It’s true for how people recharge. Some people enjoy a little exercise such as a hike in the mountains, others enjoy a sandy beach with lots of sunshine. Some want to be engaged with a lot of people and others want to be more alone or excluded.

What you eat, what you do, and how you spend your time and energy is not necessarily an identical experience for others.

What do you see through your workplace windows?

Workplace Windows

Some people enter their daily work experience with high energy, motivation, and are eager to get started. Another person, working in the exact same place and conditions has a different experience.

When you consider the organizational mission, the goals, and the purpose of your work does it excite you? Can you get behind the effort, will you roll up your sleeves and dig in? Do you believe in the leaders? Are you part of the system, or a wrench in the spokes?

What about your customers? Do you see things the same as they do? Do your products or services meet or exceed their expectations?

It is all conditioned by what you see.

Being able to step back and imagine what the other person may be seeing is the first step to understanding their actions or behaviors.

Not everyone sees the exact same thing.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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your beliefs

Your Beliefs and My Beliefs Can Be Different

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A united workforce is a good place to start. After all, everyone is in it together. Are your beliefs different from some others? Is this OK?

What do you feel strongly about?

People believe deeply in many things:

Religion

Political views

The Universe

Parental values

Authority

Government

Urban or Rural Living

Apple or Android

Chevrolet or Ford

Tattoos or no tattoos

No matter which side you are on, you may have deep beliefs. You may believe your way is the best, it is the right way, the proper way, or even the only way.

In most of these examples it doesn’t matter for making Tasty Cakes, bottling water, or growing corn.

Sure, government, authority sources, and even something like the weather has an impact, yet largely you can have differences and still unite on something that matters to others in the group.

The strength and power of your beliefs are real. Those opposing feel just as strongly.

The passion that you have is similar to others, only perhaps, different.

Your Beliefs

You can fight about it on social media but you likely aren’t changing anyone’s mind. You can Tweet about it, make signs, and conduct protests, yet you’ll likely change very few minds.

Maybe the best thing is to focus on what you have in common.

In the workplace, it is the success of the business or organization that is a commonality.

Can you join together for that?

Is that something you can work with?

Your beliefs and my beliefs can be different.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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cultural words

Cultural Words May Matter More

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When you say, “soda,” someone else may say, “pop.” Do cultural words matter in your workplace?

When someone says, “Things don’t add up.” We assume that to be a universal truth. The saying, “Two plus two isn’t equaling four,” makes us believe something is off.

It is hard to dispute math.

Words Matter

Words always matter. They matter much more than most people realize. A simple change in our sentences, a word here, or a word there, often make a difference.

In workplace cultures belief is powerfully connected to words.

We have exceptional customer service.

We ship fast.

Patience is one of our core values.

Of course, the truth in each statement is subjective. Belief in these statements will matter for sales, operations, and brand.

Belief is part of your culture. The words used to describe how things happen, what will happen, and when, create images that form the culture.

Do you believe it?

Cultural Words

Everyone should get the same result when they add ten and five together. If you don’t believe it, check it on a calculator.

A twelve-inch ruler is a universal truth. It’s one foot.

When you suggest your workplace culture is diverse, committed, and engaged it is not a universal truth. It is a belief.

A great culture doesn’t come to life because of the technology, infrastructure, or a fancy conference room. You may have 80,000 square feet, but not much of that tells us the truth about your culture.

Words help create the image. After that, it is up to everyone in the community to believe, or not.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace favors

Asking For Workplace Favors Has Limitations

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Have you ever needed a hand? Have you asked for help or asked an employee to do something appropriately professional, yet not in their job description? Do you believe that asking for workplace favors has limitations?

You probably should.

Wells Run Dry

A free drink refill at your favorite restaurant may not be a bottomless opportunity.

Asking your neighbor to hold the garage door while you install a new screw isn’t acceptable every day.

Expecting employees to work late or come in on their scheduled day off should be something less than the norm.

Sometimes, enough is enough. There probably are limitations.

The limitations that guide us are based on our expectations. The measurement that guides the expectation is often based on our individual values and beliefs.

Hence the story, “I walked 10 miles, uphill, in the snow, to school when I was a kid. Both ways!”

Society has insisted on showing us that values and beliefs are not universal.

Workplace Favors

There are plenty of fully performing employees who just want to work their shift and go home. If you are in a leadership role in the organization you may desire to work extra hours, even when you’re salaried. That doesn’t always mean that your expectation should be the same for others.

There is a race to the top and a race to the bottom. Expecting the performance and beliefs that propelled you up the ladder to be delivered by the average fully performing employee may be a big mistake.

Delivering on respect and being committed to workplace relationships are vital competences for today’s leader. They guide the organizational culture.

Going to the well too many times is never a good idea. A race to the bottom often starts as the well begins to run dry.

Don’t expect too many favors.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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finding support

Finding Support For What You Want and Believing It

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Information is available in abundance but what is the quality? Are you finding support for your ideas or behaviors? Do you believe what you find?

Confirmation bias may be the correct term. It is when we find data or information that confirms our initial beliefs. It’s data or feedback that validates and supports what we want.

In today’s World it is easy to do.

Pick Your Path

If you like aggressive, loud, and boisterous behavior you can find information to support it.

If you want to riot, cause trouble, and disagree about the sun coming up tomorrow, you can find support.

Do you want political or religious affirmation? You can find it.

How is all of this affecting your job, your livelihood, or career?

Be careful what you read. Be careful about what you see. Most of all, be careful about your actions and behaviors.

This is true for how you manage a job interview. It is true for how you communicate with your boss. Of course, it is true for your attitude and the perceptions and expectations that others have.

Belief and Denial

Ask someone if they give good customer service, then ask the customer.

It is not uncommon for a person or an entire organization to be convinced they are delivering awesome service and anyone who disagrees is just wrong. They’ll just discount the information they don’t like, it’s a form of denial.

It is much easier and comforting to believe what we want and find the backup for it.

Finding Support

Are you finding support for your values and beliefs? Support for the way you see the World? You probably don’t need to look far.

In an economy that flourishes on connections you may want to carefully consider your path.

Some paths lead to a crowd we weren’t expecting, or worse, to a dead end.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Age Differences or Generational Differences?

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Ten years ago I attended a business conference that easily had several thousand participants. I remember how exciting it was, the main stage hosted some incredible speakers and following any given performance or on scheduled breaks the hallways were buzzing with excitement.

Joyful group

One particular talk featured a businessman who discussed investments, retirement accounts, and how to monitor the stock market. It was content rich, and he delivered a very compelling message. While some would label his presentation a sales pitch others were excited to learn more about his methodologies and personal finance management tactics. As he closed his presentation he urged audience members to immediately go to visit his hallway booth where there was a limited supply of additional information and very limited seating for his next full day educational seminar coming to a location near you.

Curious I went to his booth and observed lines of people scurrying to make a purchase. While the conference was generationally diverse, in my estimation, there was no person younger than 45 or 50 years old in that line.

Was this representative of an age difference or generational difference?

One school of thought in the workplace today is that there aren’t any real generational issues, only the same patterns that have repeated themselves over and over again at least since the industrial revolution, and those patterns are about age and not about some nebulous generational malarkey. A different school of thought often comes from workplace generation experts who politely (and sometimes not so much) disagree.

Age Differences

Age differences relate to engagement, decision making, and communication preferences that are based more on age and not so much on societal trends, values and beliefs. For example, a conversation about retirement funds or a 401k balance might be of more interest to those closer to retirement age as compared to those who are just exiting high school or college. Age differences may also come about as physical changes with persons having less energy, less flexibility, or less tolerance for strenuous physical activity making them seek different ways of moving about, sitting versus standing, or even the lifting or moving of objects. In still other examples age differences might be represented in personal debt such as paying for college education or making the 15th payment of a mortgage loan as compared to the the 359th (30 year mortgage). There are many things that are connected to age that are not necessarily related different values, beliefs, or societal dynamics.

Generational Differences

Generational differences are much more likely to be connected to life experiences, emotional connections grounded in traditions, technology (or lack of), or socio-economic trends. For example, earlier generations might have little or no desire to listen to music through ear buds, perhaps preferring a more traditional method such as a device that broadcasts music through speakers of which anyone within a close range can also hear. This simple example is probably more reflective of a generational difference (rooted in technology) rather than age. Consider that if our hearing weakens with age the ear buds may actually be a better alternative but are typically trendier with younger people. Generational differences develop from societal trends during a given period of time, what felt accepted, respectful, or to be common practice. These differences might also have roots in other factors such as parental values and even in rural as compared to urban living.

In the workplace people deal with both age differences and generational differences, but the generational differences are much more complex and are not as simple as the much easier defined and navigated difference in age. Of course in any workplace we need to be very cautious of how we manage and discuss any differences in age so we are certain not to discriminate.

Are generational differences in the workplace real? Yes, and they are not improved or navigated without skillful communication, leadership, and respect.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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