Tag Archives: commonalities

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evaluating differences

Evaluating Differences Helps Future Navigation

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Do you spend too much time evaluating differences, or is it really that you don’t spend enough time evaluating them?

When you focus on things that you have in common with each other you can help create buy-in and gain mutual respect. What is more common though, is to focus on differences.

Both Commonalities and Differences

Commonalities are powerful. Differences however are an invitation to learn how to engage and promote new patterns of interaction.

When you recognize something that is not normal for you as an opportunity, it changes the course of future directions.

Many people are convinced that things will only happen in one particular way or by following one example. The same is true when you insist on replicating only one pattern. A system of sorts, but a system that limits new patterns rather than offering innovation and expansion.

When there is a breakdown in any of those approaches all future work stops. Plans are stalled, put on hold, or determined as not valid. It seems like the game is over, yet it may mean that there is a new opportunity.

The movement might be different but the goal is still achievable.

It is like cousin Eddie dancing at the wedding. He can feel the rhythm but his body moves ugly. The key is, he is still dancing!

Evaluating Differences

When you believe that more investigation about differences can create new breakthroughs the game has been upped. The advantage goes to the home team. Those breaking new ground by sharing both old and new perspectives expand, they don’t retract.

This is what progressive organizations are doing. The ones on the move. Those breaking new ground, and overcoming adversity.

If you’re winning, chances are good you’re doing it too.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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your beliefs

Your Beliefs and My Beliefs Can Be Different

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A united workforce is a good place to start. After all, everyone is in it together. Are your beliefs different from some others? Is this OK?

What do you feel strongly about?

People believe deeply in many things:

Religion

Political views

The Universe

Parental values

Authority

Government

Urban or Rural Living

Apple or Android

Chevrolet or Ford

Tattoos or no tattoos

No matter which side you are on, you may have deep beliefs. You may believe your way is the best, it is the right way, the proper way, or even the only way.

In most of these examples it doesn’t matter for making Tasty Cakes, bottling water, or growing corn.

Sure, government, authority sources, and even something like the weather has an impact, yet largely you can have differences and still unite on something that matters to others in the group.

The strength and power of your beliefs are real. Those opposing feel just as strongly.

The passion that you have is similar to others, only perhaps, different.

Your Beliefs

You can fight about it on social media but you likely aren’t changing anyone’s mind. You can Tweet about it, make signs, and conduct protests, yet you’ll likely change very few minds.

Maybe the best thing is to focus on what you have in common.

In the workplace, it is the success of the business or organization that is a commonality.

Can you join together for that?

Is that something you can work with?

Your beliefs and my beliefs can be different.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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generational commonalities

3 Generational Commonalities

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What is more important our differences or commonalities? There is so much expression about how workforce generations are different; it might be refreshing to understand a little bit more about what they have in common. Have you ever thought about generational commonalities?

Many people agree that there are challenges when reaching across the workforce generations and often we hear about the negativity experienced from baby boomers or the sense of entitlement when it comes to the millennials. Perhaps there is too much energy spent on examining differences. What do we have in common?

Generational Commonalities

Here are three (of many) things all generations share:

  1. Trust – employees of all generations want to feel a sense of trust. When you believe in the people you work with and trust them, your communication and job performance improves. Trust, like respect, often has to be earned.
  2. Respect – everyone wants respect. The trouble spot when working across the generations is that everyone (or each generation) may define respect differently. Sometimes respect is assumed or given, but many times it must be earned.
  3. Change – when you find a group of employees feeling uneasy, nervous, and afraid, you have probably found a team who is experiencing change. This feeling has little or nothing to do with generational orientation, it often comes from what someone feels they have to lose, or gain.

Silver Bullets

While it may be hard to find the silver bullet or quick fix to solving cross-generational conflict, a focus on differences tends to increase the visibility and opportunity for negativity. On the other hand, when we focus more on our commonalities we might discover that we have deeply rooted mutual goals. Better understanding of common goals can unite people. It may also help to eliminate barriers that keep teams from achieving high performance.

What would you rather do, chronically discuss differences, or unite your team and achieve excellence?

Choose excellence.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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3 Skills Boomers Need To Stay Competitive

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It is in the news every day. Millennials this and boomers that, millennials are quitting, and boomers need retirement money. Millennials are on their phones, and boomers won’t change. Human resource professionals grow tired of the complaints and the revolving door. While we single handedly won’t solve all of society’s issues overnight, we can take steps to realize the root causes of some of our worst problems and create a path to ease our pain.

046762709-smiling-businesswoman

Boomers are looking for jobs (and job security) just as the millennials are, and let us not forget traditionals, generation X, and generation 9/11 people. Boomers still represent a large portion of our active workforce, and while large numbers are retiring others are trying to solidify their presence.

Here are three skills that every boomer should be sure they master:

1. Illustrate. Saying is not doing, and being able to talk about issues and taking action are certainly two different things. Boomers need to illustrate that they are eager to learn, that they have empathy, and that they work towards commonalities not just express differences and expect conformity.

2. Listen. One of the most talked about, but often not heard, is the importance of good listening skills. This includes things such as, think before you speak, be curious of the perspective of others, and be patient while seeking to understand.

3. Change. Change surrounds us and it isn’t centered on any generation. While it may be natural to feel some fear when the unexpected occurs all generations need to learn to expect change. Workplace survival may depend on every person being willing to break a tradition, approach something different with an open mind and less resistance, and of course, be willing to embrace new technologies.

If you’ve read this carefully you will probably quickly recognize that there are far more than just three skills to consider. However, when we package them into three specific areas it may help to make practicing to be more competitive, easier.

Are you competitive?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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