Tag Archives: job

  • -
responsible work

Doing Responsible Work and Making a Difference

Tags : 

Often the first step in the argument is the assignment of blame and the question of responsibility. Being a great employee, boss, or owner, often requires doing responsible work and serving as a role model for future efforts.

Are you a freedom seeker? A set your own schedule and do your own thing kind of person?

The Illusion of Freedom

Did you show up for work on time? Prepare for the meeting, arrive a little early, open your mind for the possibilities? Are you holding yourself accountable or expecting accountability only when someone asks?

People dream of being their own boss. They consider the idea that entrepreneurship or leading the team sets them free. Free to do as they please, when they want, and they’ll decide how fast it will happen.

Largely the work of this type of dreamer is an illusion. Often it is illustrated by get rich quick and get freedom now schemes on social media. Strategies that are more pyramid in nature or cloaked in the multilevel marketing philosophy. Buyer beware.

Responsible Work

The work of successful freedom seekers comes with a catch. The catch is that they are more responsible and accountable than ever.

An employee who sets their own schedule or who maps out their own job is not only responsible for the work, but they are on the hook for the outcomes too. Self-designed and self-managed means even greater proof of performance.

It is also true for the entrepreneur. Every customer has some demand, expectation, and specialized need. There is not one boss, but many.

Making a difference and doing responsible work go hand in hand.

The assumption that there is freedom from a strict schedule, the micromanaging supervisor, or forced overtime is often an illusion.

Success comes with a commitment to excellence. Success is an opportunity that you create.

That always means doing responsible work.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
employees stay

When Employees Stay, There Is a Reason

Tags : 

Employee turnover is costly. Every organization knows this. Certainly, some attrition is normal. When employees stay, what is their reason?

Temporary Stay

You may go to the bus stop, the grocery store, or your favorite restaurant, you never intend to stay. The same is true for college, the hair salon, and a vacation spot.

Some appear more opportunistic than others. The vacation spot may have a certain attraction, yet it is unrealistic for most people to stay.

Back at the workplace, your job, or the organization that you work for may be viewed as temporary. You’ll attend for a while, but the time is limited.

Average years before a promotion, a career change, or a new and different employer seem attractively short sighted. Some organizations suggest they hire with this in mind. Be a stepping stone, get what you can while you can and move on.

Employees Stay

The gas station, the convenience store, or the hotel, as an operation, they seek no visits with the intent to stay. They are built that way. Visit, do your business, and be gone. No loitering.

It seems counterintuitive that of all the investment organizations make in capital equipment they often come up short with the investment in human capital.

Employees who stay in their workplace will stay for a reason. One of the biggest reasons is that the organization is built that way. The organization has the value and engagement that employees who enter, seek. Yes, pay will matter, and so will continuous opportunity.

Two things about greener grass. You only see it when you are looking and if not an illusion, the grass has better care.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
my job

Will My Job Always Be This Way?

Tags : 

Nothing lasts forever. I remember my job as a Computer Programmer, I was in my early twenties and a manager said to me, “Tough times don’t last but tough people do.” I liked it, and I never forgot it.

Grand Illusion

People sometimes get caught up in the idea that the present moment, the space they are in right now, is where they will be forever. It is an illusion of life that we allow when our frame is too narrow.

The project we are working on. It is temporary. The team we are working with, likely, is temporary. The software program, the difficult customer, and the person who annoys you. Temporary.

It will seem like common knowledge when I suggest that we can control our own fate. Yet, the frame that we sometimes hold ourselves behind does the opposite. It restricts us, limits us, and establishes belief patterns that can convince us of little hope for a better outcome.

My Job

Do you enjoy your work? Work is work, it probably has its moments of good and bad for everyone, yet rest assured that your job isn’t staying the same. Love it or hate it, things are going to change.

Business cycles change. Government regulations change. The needs of society will change.

If we experience an unexpected change, we may feel shock, frustration, and confusion. We may feel a lot of stress and pressure. This moment feels like bottom. Something is over, done, finished. The end.

Only if our frame says so.

Certainly, things end, even our job. The job we loved or the job we hated. It won’t last forever.

Stop believing that it will.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • 2
job appreciation

How Long Does Job Appreciation Last?

Tags : 

Is appreciation important? At your workplace is job appreciation plentiful?

As with most things in life, job appreciation may be the result of our efforts.

When was the last time you heard, “Thank you, nice work!”?

This is a question I often ask in leadership or cultural development seminars. Reactions vary, but largely it stumps the group. They can’t seem to quickly remember when they’ve heard it, or said it. Some will scoff and shout, “Never!”

Good Focus

We have good days and bad days. When was the last time you said, “Thank you, you just made my day!”?

The best workplace cultures have the determination to place value on appreciation. Not to the extent that praise is overcooked and it becomes a mild form of sarcasm. It must however, have significant emphasis and focus.

We seem to remember vividly the last time someone hurt our feelings, harshly criticized our work, or when we somehow missed the big opportunity.

As a natural human reaction to avoid hurt and pain, our brains try to learn. Yet to learn, we analyze and replay those memories much more than our successes. Some would suggest we are hard-wired this way. It is our evolution, it is in our genes.

Job Appreciation

Should we make job appreciation last longer? Should we try to consciously use our energy to remember the good, relive the success, and focus vividly on accomplishments? Is giving encouragement and praise a cultural value?

The answer seems clear and easy.

In order to do this though, it requires effort and strength. It requires us to put emphasis on the positive. We need to use our energy wisely, share success, and congratulate others.

It is easy to state that you are trying to be positive. Much more difficult is putting it into motion.

In the workplace, it may start by seeing the value that everyone brings to the table. It may start by saying, “Thank you, nice work!”

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


  • -
career lane

Career Lane, Should You Stay In It?

Tags : 

People often suggest, “Stay in your lane.” Should you stay in your career lane, make a shift, or be wider, broader, and demonstrate many skills?

Occasionally I will catch a dog show on TV. They’ll use words like, best in class, best of breed, or best in show.

What does it take to be at the top of the group? What about your personal best? Who is the competition?

About Numbers

How can you get promoted, get selected for an interview or become the successful candidate?

Let’s assume you are in sales. What is your goal? To achieve the top three or five percent of your entire team? To be number one? Out of how many?

Getting to the top five percent would mean being number one or number two, out of forty. The bigger the field gets, the more people you must rise above.

Competition

Competition to get selected for an interview and get the job can be brutal. Our digital age means the number of competitors is usually large.

People may think, “Maybe my career shouldn’t be in sales, but it could be sales related. I can apply myself to more than one area.”

The thought is when we broaden our scope, we’ve just created more chances. The irony is, doing this increases the competition, it dilutes your focus, and has made getting selected as a best in show even harder.

Career Lane

Making a career change is fine. I’ve done it three times across a thirty plus year career.

What is important is to pick a lane. Stick with it long enough to make a proper evaluation. Be consistent and stay focused.

Best of breed is easier than best in show.

You can be a big fish in a small pond. If you decide to jump into the ocean is it an entirely new game.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
two career paths

Two Career Paths, Which Is Yours?

Tags : 

If you had a choice which path would you choose? It is a question that many of us ponder each day. Not always consciously, but we’re working on it in the background. There are at least two career paths, which one are you on?

Sometimes the problem is that there is a goal in mind, but the path, plan, or process remains elusive.

Become the manager of the department.

Get the advanced degree in my field and pivot. 

Find a job doing the work I love.

Two Career Paths

The first path is simple. Put in some effort, land a job, do the work, and see where things go. Sometimes this is a career. It is easy to go through the motions each day.

Good effort at work. Enjoy a little free time here and there. Spend time with the kids. Have a hobby or take a vacation.

It isn’t your dream job, but it is work. It doesn’t pay what you want, but you are surviving. Suddenly weeks turn into months and months to years.

It’s a job and you’re doing alright. Life rolls on.

The second path is different. It has purpose. It may include a journey down the first path, but there is a different kind of objective. The objective is to use the first path to get to the second path.

Career Strategy

If you have a goal, you need a plan. When you have a goal and a plan, you need to execute. As you execute you must compare outcomes to timelines and milestones. Adjust, and move forward. Failure to do any of this puts you back on the first path.

Many will suggest it all depends on how bad you want it.

I would suggest that the recipe for success also includes commitment, discipline, and self-confidence. You’ll need to add in accountability and belief to get the best flavor.

You can let your career happen to you, or you can make your career work for you. Neither choice is wrong. Just remember, it is a choice.

What path are you on?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
changing everything

When Changing Everything Doesn’t Make a Difference

Tags : 

New curtains may help, perhaps a new sofa, or a remodeled kitchen. Maybe it will take a new job, a new boss, or a total career shift. Changing everything may not make the difference you seek.

It’s funny where we place the blame. We look to our clothes, look in the closet, or sign up for the job postings feed. The thought is that this is what matters the most.

Of course, change can be good. It can make a significant difference. Change can be positive and leave behind the negative. What may matter most is understanding the root cause of why change feels required.

Understanding Your Change

Listening is an amazing thing. What you hear can make the difference for what you do. Even listening to yourself can be more valuable (or destructive) than what many people realize.

By now we’ve all heard that money can’t buy happiness. We know it as a truism. We see some of the wealthiest people still seeking happiness and living in a deeply depressive state of mind.

On the flip side we see some of the kindest, gentlest people who seem to have little more than the clothes on their back, and they are happy.

Certainly, money can matter, and so can people, relationships, faith, and hope.

Perhaps it is time to think twice about what you are changing. Think about the reasons why. Not the reasons you are justifying it, but the true reason why. And yes, there is a difference between the two.

Changing Everything

Changing everything and starting new seems like a good plan.

It is the new furniture, car, or job. It feels good, for a while.

Then suddenly, it just feels the same again.

People waste a lot of energy on changing everything. It may all be possible by changing just one thing.

What is your one thing?

-DEG

Do you need help discovering the one thing for your career or business? Coaching can help.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
career strategy fails

What Will You Do If Your Career Strategy Fails?

Tags : 

Are you in full stride for your career? Have you been thinking about making a change? It is common to feel indecisive or stuck. Have you thought about what you’ll do if your career strategy fails?

Nearly everyone has jumped out of something. They’ve left the meeting early, dropped a class in school, or given up on a personal relationship.

They’ve bailed.

Getting In or Getting Out

Getting involved in something is easy. You raise your hand, give a nod, or click to sign up. What do you do if you want out?

Most people who walk into a room, leave by the same door. Jump in your car, you get out the same way you got in.

In our career, we’re told, “Don’t burn your bridges.”

If you’re unhappy there is a way out. It may very well be through the same door you got in. Do you want to bail or is it just a rough patch?

What Matters Most?

Organizational culture matters. Your boss matters. Neither usually change easily or quickly. Both are common reasons for leaving.

What if you decided that leaving didn’t support your long-term strategy. Could it make more sense to tough it out? What can you learn from any adversity connected to the situation? Is there something to value about staying a little longer?

It’s a tough spot. Do you feel like your career strategy is off? Does it feel like things have broken down and are not repairable?

A bump may not be failure.

Career Strategy Fails

What causes people to leave the meeting, drop a class, or walk-out on a relationship that may not be perfect? Often, there is a time to move on. The best question may be, “Is it now?”

Here are my thoughts. Don’t stay because you feel that you don’t have a choice. Don’t go just because you can. Remain connected to your strategy for growth.

Happiness matters, but a couple of bad days may not be a sign that your strategy is failing.

Don’t sacrifice long-term goals for short-term feel goods.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • 2
career story

How Are You Creating Your Career Story?

Tags : 

Everyone has a story, right? What is your story? I hear a lot of stories about doom and gloom. I hear a lot of embellished stories, and stories that may not even be real. What is your career story?

Career Story

If you aren’t happy with your story, the good news is that you can change it. It really doesn’t matter if you’re early in your career, mid-career, or even in the sunset. Your career is about your story.

We have stories all around us. There are biblical stories, stories of the land before time, and stories about developing nations, economies, and intellect. Your career is not about a single moment. It’s built across time.

If you don’t like how your story is starting you can change it. If you don’t like the flow, or the emerging ending, you can change it.

Sometimes the biggest hurdle is understanding your career is not a job. It is not a place, a city, a town, or an industry sector. It is something you’re building.

Seeking Change

If you feel that you need to do something different, don’t wait. You’re going to have to get involved. Make changes, grow your network, find more moments that build your story.

It may begin with what you’re telling yourself. Have you assessed your competencies? Do you need new skills, retraining, or updating? Perhaps.

Keep in mind however, that many people get the opportunity of a lifetime in an area that they aren’t so skilled. And now you’re asking, “How?”

The answer is easy, they have some boxes checked, but they are using their relationships (networking) to create the next opportunity.

What is your next moment? What if you look for the next part of your story, instead of a job. Invest in doing something that feels natural, feels good, and creates connection?

It’s time to build more of your story. People are waiting to hear it.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • 4
overlooked

Overlooked, Why Fitting In May Leave You Out

Tags : 

It starts with the job offer. The day your employer decides to extend you a job offer may be the first moment you become stuck. Do you feel like you are being overlooked for advancement? Are you wondering what you can do now?

Not everyone is trying to build a respectable career, some only want to supplement the family income. The truth is that most organizations need some of both types of employees.

Point of Hire

When you ask the hiring manager for the behind the scenes honesty about job applicant choices it probably won’t be long until they use the word, fit. Employers are looking for the best fit for the current job opening.

Both potential candidates and employers struggle with finding the right balance of fit versus satisfying future needs.

But you got the job. Six months ago, or ten years ago, and you’re looking for the sure-fire method to advance your career.

Seeking Advancement

There are really only two answers for this situation. One is that this employer is not where you should hang your hat and you should seek a new employer. The other is, that you need to be the best choice for advancement.

Neither answer may be easy, but from my experiences those are the cards you hold in your hand.

Assuming you want to stay with the current employer you must become the best fit for the new or advanced role. That typically occurs with proof.

Proof that you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities, or that you are prepared to get them. It also means the right attitude and continuous demonstration of commitment.

Overlooked

For the organization, perfect employees are often hard to come by, but perfection is usually not their goal.

Prove that you are the best fit and you’ll succeed.

If you are certain that you’ve been crossed off the opportunity for advancement list and that you may be overlooked forever. You probably should consider doing everything you can to continue to fit, but privately you should consider seeking a different employer.

It starts at the point of hire. If the fit is exactly what they need and that need or additional opportunities do not develop across time, fitting in may leave you out.

Out of what? Out of opportunity since you are the best fit for the [current] job.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


Search This Website

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Upcoming Public Events

  1. Management and Leadership Certificate

    March 17 @ 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
  2. Aspiring Leader Seminar – Williamsport, PA

    June 2 @ 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
  3. PACD Management Summit

    September 2 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Blog (Filter) Categories

Follow me on Twitter

Assessment Services and Tools

Strategic, Competency, or Needs Assessments, DiSC Assessments, 360 Feedback, and more. Learn more