Tag Archives: human capital

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workplace impact

Workplace Impact Requires a Commitment

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Are you interested in workplace impact? Not just occupying a place and receiving a check, true impact?

Many businesses measure their bottom line by simply comparing revenues and expenses. They can show you, “Here are our sales and our expenses.”

Simple enough.

Yet simple enough doesn’t define the organization. The culture defines the organization and most culture is developed across time and through commitment.

The new hire wonders if they’ll make it through the first day, then they’re happy about the first week, the first month, and so on. What is their goal? Six months, two years, or are they planning to just go with the flow?

How will the organization measure the employee’s success? Is there a cultural fit, mutual respect, and engagement?

Is this person making an impact? They probably know what they cost.

Impact requires a commitment.

Workplace Impact

Your background and expertise aren’t built in a couple of months. You don’t learn everything required for a high school or college education in six weeks.

When you want to really make an impact, you’re going to have to view it across time. Sure, there will be moments of impact. What led to those moments was the result a longer-term commitment.

Businesses with the best cultures aren’t measuring people by what they cost. People are not an expense. They are an investment.

It brings two words to the front of my mind: Human Capital.

Yet, you can’t just say it. You need to live it.

Daily. Across time.

For the employer and the employee.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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competitive measurement

Competitive Measurement, Does It Motivate?

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Metrics and measurements may be your key for monitoring performance. Does competitive measurement provide motivation?

Brutal truth, some people like to compete.

There is often some concern about competing within the same organization. Competing for sales numbers, efficiencies, and even for promotions.

It’s true, it can be a delicate balance. Internal fighting is not good and the competitive spirit pushed too far can cause trouble spots for ethics.

What do you think, is competitive measurement healthy for the organization?

I believe it can be as long as it is properly managed.

Competitive Measurement

When we set metrics and we start to measure we are typically pushing to new levels. Whether it is in sales, quantity, or quality. It could also be in customer count, customer satisfaction, or lifetime value.

On the other hand, when we measure nothing, how do we know for sure that there is improvement? If there is no metric, the status quo seems like a probable path.

If you are using metrics and measurement to guide performance have you considered other aspects connected with performance?

What about things like worker engagement, stress, or employee turnover?

Certainly, those are metrics. You could even go a little further, with things like resiliency or happiness.

The Human Experience

The point is really this. When you invoke that competitive spirit and bring out the motivation and drive to stretch, reach, and conquer goals, don’t forget about the human side of those measurements.

When management squeezes out the human side with numbers things seem to work for a while. Yet, after a while some humans will lose connection with the purpose.

If the purpose is only to hit the number, then no one really cares about the person.

A scary place to be.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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employees stay

When Employees Stay, There Is a Reason

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Employee turnover is costly. Every organization knows this. Certainly, some attrition is normal. When employees stay, what is their reason?

Temporary Stay

You may go to the bus stop, the grocery store, or your favorite restaurant, you never intend to stay. The same is true for college, the hair salon, and a vacation spot.

Some appear more opportunistic than others. The vacation spot may have a certain attraction, yet it is unrealistic for most people to stay.

Back at the workplace, your job, or the organization that you work for may be viewed as temporary. You’ll attend for a while, but the time is limited.

Average years before a promotion, a career change, or a new and different employer seem attractively short sighted. Some organizations suggest they hire with this in mind. Be a stepping stone, get what you can while you can and move on.

Employees Stay

The gas station, the convenience store, or the hotel, as an operation, they seek no visits with the intent to stay. They are built that way. Visit, do your business, and be gone. No loitering.

It seems counterintuitive that of all the investment organizations make in capital equipment they often come up short with the investment in human capital.

Employees who stay in their workplace will stay for a reason. One of the biggest reasons is that the organization is built that way. The organization has the value and engagement that employees who enter, seek. Yes, pay will matter, and so will continuous opportunity.

Two things about greener grass. You only see it when you are looking and if not an illusion, the grass has better care.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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labor shortage

Labor Shortage: A Tale of Two Companies

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Finding the right employee for the job can certainly be challenging. Unemployment numbers anchor us to believe that the task may be even harder than we originally thought. Do you have a labor shortage?

I feel lucky to have the opportunity to speak with business owners, hiring managers, and front-line workers in a wide variety of sectors. I encounter good people looking for work and good companies struggling to fill openings.

What or where is the mismatch? Is it all about wages?

Labor Shortage

Ask an organizational leader why they cannot fill job openings and you’ll hear things like:

  • The millennials (and GenZ) don’t want to work. 
  • No one wants to work for the rate of pay we’re offering.
  • It’s hard work, most of these kids want a come and go as you please desk job. 
  • We don’t have a labor shortage. We have a skill shortage.
  • Factory work is dead. No one wants to do it anymore. 

Does this seem like a good list? I think it is a good start, and there are many variations of those comments that are closely connected.

How are you managing the labor shortage?

Two Companies

Imagine company one, they believe that they need someone to stack widgets into a box, all day long. When the box is full and heavy, they need to move it to the truck for shipping.

Times are tough and tools to improve the work are costly. Company management knows packing the box and shipping it makes money. Anything else, any stall, or stop, it costs the company money.

The CEO, CFO, and plant manager, measure the cost of manual labor from the income statement. Their cultural observation, “Keep expenses low.”

Then there is company two. At company two they also need widgets stacked into a box. They’ll need the boxes prepared for shipping, loaded, and then shipped.

Recognizing times are tough, they are planning for the long haul, they make an investment.

They hire people to ensure the widgets are stacked, loaded, and shipped. They also encourage them to find better ways. Employees are not just packers and shippers, they are also engineering the future.

The C-Suite and front-line management insist that people are an investment. Their cultural observation, “Employees are a human capital investment. Everyone helps make the Company better.”

People Choices

It is easy to quickly scoff at this story, and of course, I’m over-simplifying it.

Of the many organizations in many different sectors I work with, I can tell the difference between success and failure from their language.

One company hires employees as a tool to get the job done, they are an expense. Another, different company, hires human capital to ensure the success of the organization.

People have a choice.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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