Tag Archives: people

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boss decides

The Boss Decides How Service Will Look and Feel

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Front-line employees are expected to follow the path created for them. The boss decides what that path will look like and how it should be followed. Does this system work?

Sometimes.

Largely though, the path created has some flaws. There are unexpected obstacles and hurdles. The flow chart reaches decision loops and dead ends.

Systems and People

Consequences for a failed system are shown on the income statement, or dealt with by the front-line, or both.

A system working in the black doesn’t mean that the system is working, at least not as completely or effectively as it could.

What could go wrong? It’s designed by the boss.

Businesses are comprised of a system. They’re also comprised of people.

Are investments made in the people?

What is the hiring practice? Hire a friend of a friend? The bosses relative? Are these the best choices?

Are people in the system listening?

Does the system allow for empathy and compassion?

What is the culture? Are employees trained and invested in, or are they viewed as a tool to accomplish a task?

The Boss Decides

Most workplaces are held to a standard.

There is always a culture and likely sub-cultures. Those components are developed by the boss. The boss decides what the organization looks like.

Most employees only have a few choices.

They can role model exactly what the culture illustrates, in a failed system or failing culture they can attempt to role model something better, or they can leave.

When the employees care enough to try to make a difference will anyone listen?

The boss decides.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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bad idea people

Bad Idea People and Committing to a New Direction

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You probably know some bad ideal people. I’m not referencing people who have failure ideas. I’m referencing people who think every new idea, is a bad idea.

Do you know someone like this?

Brainstorming is a worthy adventure. Properly executed a good facilitator can really help intact teams break some new ground.

Good facilitation comes from expertise as a facilitator, not as a subject matter expert. His or her job is to ask questions, get thoughts flowing, ask more questions, better questions, and bring forward things that may have otherwise never surfaced.

Questions Matter

Everyone should ask more questions.

Challenging the process has good value. However, being the flow zapper, energy robber, or the negative Nellie should be left out.

Every new idea should be challenged.

Every old idea, if it is still worthy of discussion, it should be challenged too.

Most good plans aren’t chiseled in stone. The best plans allow for fluidity, adjustment, and redirection. They have metrics and measurements, timelines and milestones.

Put the wrong ideas into motion and you’re wasting precious time and other valuable resources.

Bad Idea People

There are many forces connected with change. The best way to navigate it is to start with a good plan. Good plans develop from good questions.

The worst way to navigate is blocking new direction by suggesting everything is a bad idea.

Use questions for pursuit of the purpose, not for the pursuit of stopping or blocking.

Bad idea people are a distraction from your purpose.

Stay focused.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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exciting culture

Exciting Culture and What Makes It a Good Time

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Do you have an exciting culture? Do people show up for work, the conference call, or the staff meeting pumped up and ready to go?

There is always the, “One in every crowd.”

One who brings in the motivation, enthusiasm and passion.

There may also be the one who drags their butt around like they walked 100 miles to get there.

The desirable, of course, is the engaging passion for what is about to happen next. How is that created?

Always Up to You

When you attend the meeting, the workshop, or the convention, what makes the difference? Does the power of one change the atmosphere and outcomes?

Like many things in life, it seems that you only get out of it what you put into it.

It is true for learning. If you don’t read, study, and experience something deeper you probably aren’t going to pick up much.

It is true for the artist, the researcher, and the chef, the effort you apply will have a direct correlation to what spins out of it.

Does your contribution affect culture?

Exciting Culture

Think about this when you attend the next event that involves other people. How you show up will have a lot to do with what others will experience. Your enthusiasm, like attitude, is contagious.

The culture then, which by the way is a long-run game, depends on how the vibes are spread. Are you springing into action or dragging around like you just walked 100 miles?

You always have an opportunity to make a difference.

The question then becomes, “Will you?”

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace culture leverage

Workplace Culture Leverage Means More

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Mankind discovered the advantage of the lever in the stone age. Sir Isaac Newton receives credit for framing the concepts associated with gravity. Does workplace culture leverage matter?

When asked about culture, many businesses will tell a story about their environment. They’ll mention their recent remodeling efforts, break rooms, or nature path that is around the back of the building.

These things all add value and may be important, yet they are really about shaping the environment which may have little or nothing to do with building a better culture.

Culture Contributions

Your culture includes contributions from many different angles. It is somewhat about the physical environment, yet it is also about people, communication, and symbols.

When the CEO says, “Let’s have a meeting outside of the office and be sure to BYOD (bring your own device) we’ll be accessing things during the meeting.” A segment, if not all of those receiving the invitation will get excited. They get excited because it is new, different, trendy, and gives them bragging rights about the greatness of the organization where they work.

This is leverage.

Workplace Culture Leverage

Each time organization leadership promotes or engages in emotion building activities or events, it stimulates culture. Culture is about people. Leverage is about moving something in a direction with more ease.

Organization culture is much easier to build when there is a compelling reason to participate. Pushing cultural values or creating fear is a short run game with little or no future leverage.

Avoid the mistake of assuming that culture is more about objects or material things than it is about people. Culture is created through our experiences and emotions. Passion, motivation, and the interest to build community all happen as a result.

Building something is always about more than the money that is involved.

Leverage everything that connects people.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Wrong people

Wrong People Are Often Right

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People worry about the risk of being wrong. Taking a chance, exploring an opportunity, what is the real cost? Wrong people are often also the same people who get it right.

What is the risk for you? Is it your image, your reputation, or the thought that you might be fired?

Statistics on Right

It is Little League World Series time in Pennsylvania. A time each year when thousands of people descend upon the small city of, Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

How many pitches will be thrown? How many strike outs, bases loaded, and catches dropped? What about base hits, home runs, and runs batted in?

Baseball is often much like our workplace life. The more chances we take the more chances we’ll have some success.

The statistical aspect of chances taken are what probably matters the most. One risk, one correct choice, seems easy. Looking deeper beyond the statistics you may ask, “How risky was that?”

Wrong People

It happens at the start of every brainstorming meeting. “No idea is a bad idea,” someone will proclaim. Yet, participants in the meeting will still wonder about the consequences before they speak.

Taking the risk of being wrong is the first step to taking a risk of being right.

Wrong people are not wrong all of the time. The trick is being right, at the right time.

Perfect scores, perfect seasons, and businesses and organizations on the move don’t happen without a few mistakes. The people who can live with being wrong are the same people who thrive on being right.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workforce learning

Workforce Learning, it Sticks and Grows

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It is all about culture. At least that is what most experts will say. Does building your organization have anything to do with workforce learning?

A couple of entrepreneurs get together and start a company. A few years later and they have a company of fifty or one hundred. And so the organization is growing, or so it appears.

What is creating the culture?

Culture and Change

Growth means change and change means learning. “Go get buy-in. Get everyone bought-in.” the CEO requests.

Yet many people struggle to understand how buy-in is achieved. Shouting about buy-in may disrupt the flow, yet getting traction often requires something different.

Marketing, advertising, and selling matter, they help spread the idea. Yet adoption of the idea may still require a different approach.

Difference Makers

Every day there is a person who sings in the shower. A person who paints a picture, and a person who demonstrates great leadership around the workplace.

Yet, the shower singer may not become an Elvis Presley, Whitney Houston, or Mariah Carey. The picture painter may not become as well known as Michelangelo, Rembrandt, or Picasso. And the workplace leader may never make it to the C-Suite.

However, each one of these people bring something forward. The extent of their interactions may make a difference for someone’s day or even positively change a life, or two, or three. They help others learn, grow, and perhaps identify with a culture.

Workforce Learning

Organizational culture is made up of many things. Mostly, things that are driven by people. People who share with other people.

Buy-in is created by shared experiences. People who participate together build it together. It catches on, and it sticks. It has value and no one wants wasted effort.

Workforce learning helps people decide how they’ll shape the culture. When they discover value, they share it and then suggest that their friends try it too.

They’re bought-in, it sticks, and it grows.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace change

Workplace Change and Remembering the People

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Has your workplace decided to shift direction, pivot, or use new technology? Have you changed machines, relocated, upsized, or downsized? Have you been bought by another entity? Never forget that workplace change involves people.

Since I officially entered the workspace at the age of seventeen, I’ve been around more than a few decades. I’ve seen a thing or two.

As we grow and expand our knowledge and businesses, especially with more technology, one constant remains, people.

How does workplace change impact people? How do the people affect the process or outcomes? Sadly, these two questions are often forgotten or taken for granted.

Change and People

Imagine you give Tiger Woods a brand-new set of golf clubs. These clubs are the most advanced clubs ever made. They feature the latest in technology, they are efficient, effective, and they are smart. They are also very expensive.

You hand them to Tiger and send him out on the course. A course he knows well and has played many times. Weather conditions are perfect. Will Tiger’s score improve?

Likely, not at first. He has never used these clubs before, they are different, he’ll need to learn more about them, get a feel, and adjust his style and approach.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand this practical example of the outcome of change.

Why then do so many businesses, so many engineers, CEO’s, and other really smart people expect something different with workplace change?

Workplace Change

If you sense that I’m about to jump on the soapbox for a minute, you’re correct. I have witnessed too many business fatalities.

Smart people who have calculated everything about their new equipment or technology. Floor space, power, cost of ownership, and the specifications for throughput or output. They’ve done it all.

Except for one thing. How their people will navigate this change.

Sound silly? It is. I’m begging you. Stop the madness.

Have a plan for how you’ll integrate your change with the people. How they’ll know what to do, when, how far, how high, and how long. Plan for the costs and especially for the time.

You probably wouldn’t tackle heart surgery without a surgeon.

Hire experts who can help you with your people.

-DEG

Need some help with people? Contact me

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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models

Role Models & Marinade, Underneath It’s Still Chicken

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Who are your role models? Many will suggest that role models are important for success. Not to be copied or duplicated, but to learn from and expand your intellect, value, and worth.

Have your role models created an unrealistic expectation?

Expectations and Reality

On social media it seems that everyone is living the dream, they have the perfect beach picture, the kiddos birthday party, and the hottest car. They also have a flawless complexion, the best smile, and the brightest eyes.

Dr. Hook always wanted to see his picture on the cover of the Rolling Stone. A sense of accomplishment, value, and worth. The feeling of, we made it.

Role models, an image, is it all that it is meant to be? Are role models a positive tactic or do they create unrealistic expectations? Is reality TV really a reality?

Confusion of fantasy and reality seems much easier to create today.

False Perceptions

Technology connected to social media helps us change images, improve complexion, and whiten teeth faster than we can get fries at the McDonald’s drive through lane.

Mainstream news channels feature anchors who are prepped with makeup, hair, and the perfect outfit. We have movie stars with capped teeth, cosmetic surgery, and what appears to be a life of glamour. Yet, they’re all just people.

Role Models

Role models are valuable. They can help us learn and grow. They can give us something to aspire to, motivation to put in the hard work, and develop a sense of pride, accomplishment, and worth.

Role models can also set unrealistic expectations, increase anxiety, and lower self-esteem.

It is always important to keep in mind that underneath all the glamour, the fame, and the clever filter used on the picture, we are all just people.

The President of the business where you work, just a person. The glamour model who looks perfect, just a person. Your friend from high school with the perfect family, kids, and career, still just a person.

You can throw some chicken in marinade for hours, it may look different and taste different, but underneath it is still just chicken.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+

 


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people resist change

How to Manage People Who Resist Change

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Change is happening all around us. Despite any opposition, despite feelings and emotions, change is happening. In the workplace, how do you manage the people who resist change?

Announce the new marketing plan, a strategic direction, or personnel changes, and people will disagree. It isn’t the exception, it is the norm.

Listen and Learn

The people who resist change can tell us a lot. First, they self-identify, which is a management bonus right up front. Second, we have to listen carefully. They may have some good points. When properly managed, they can actually help strengthen the change.

What often happens is that those responsible to manage, or those responsible to engage with the naysayers attempt to smooth over the change, make everyone happy, and find some neutral ground, compromise.

Will Compromise Work

Compromise seems logical. It feels like the right thing to do. Until no matter how hard or how much you bend, shape, and twist the change there always seems to be another argument about why it isn’t the right direction.

Of course, there is always the possibility that they are correct. Maybe it is a bad move. Perhaps, but when you work around the naysayers long enough you may discover that it is the same people regardless of the change.

It is a pattern. Goals aren’t being achieved, problems are occurring, measurements are accurate but the indications are clear that something needs to change. Still, the naysayers find a reason to resist. Management tries to find a way to appease.

People Who Resist Change

So how can you make everyone happy? It could be that what really makes the naysayers happy is to express that they aren’t happy. They want a voice. They want to be heard. Objections and criticism give them a platform.

The dynamics of any change are situational and circumstantial. However, sometimes the best way to make the naysayers happy is to give them their platform and keep moving forward.

Certainly, it is a delicate balance of knowing, understanding, and making good decisions when you are responsible for the outcomes. Listen carefully and learn, sometimes though you just need to keep moving.

– DEG

Originally posted on December 1, 2017, last updated on October 22, 2018.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Media impacts culture

How Media Impacts Culture and Climate

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Hustle and bustle every day, some people talk about the push, others about the pull. Your organizational culture is impacted by social climate. Have you thought about how media impacts culture?

Media is exploding. It isn’t just the daily paper anymore. In fact, it hasn’t been the daily paper for some time.

Information Sources

Media is available everywhere, consider these sources and impacts:

  • YouTube video
  • Political tweet
  • A Facebook argument
  • Niche satellite radio channels
  • Podcasts
  • Newspapers
  • On-line news
  • Libraries
  • Tabloids
  • Magazines
  • Non-business LinkedIn content
  • Business LinkedIn content
  • Billboards
  • AM/FM Radio
  • Talk shows
  • Television news
  • Books
  • College classrooms
  • Email chains
  • Blogs
  • Vlogs
  • Pinterest favorites
  • Word of mouth
  • World of mouth

When you consider how marketing and social climate impact culture you’ll quickly recognize that the call to action you hope for and the one you get may be completely different. When you ask why, consider the vast amount media sources that affect your environment.

Marketing and Action

Organizational culture has never been more important and social climate impacts never more profound. The constant stream of infiltration by marketers and the press doesn’t come from one or two sources.

Getting information is easy. Digesting information and execution is far more challenging.

What springs your team into action? What will cause them to leap, understand what is urgent, and get into a positive rhythm?

Media Impacts Culture

Does culture shape the media or is media shaping the culture?

There are videos running at gas pumps, charging stations, and in the elevator. Smartphones and electronic tablets are everywhere. People, compelled by moving parts and flashy content repeated over and over again may create a culture.

People will connect with what interests them and the source doesn’t matter so much when the content is compelling.

Media impacts culture.

Is part of your business media?

Maybe it should be.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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