Tag Archives: authority

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workplace navigation

Workplace Navigation And Leadership Responsibility

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Workplace navigation is everyone’s responsibility. If you are identifying as a leader, or have the goal of being a better leader, it is even more important.

Many people quickly view the challenge of leadership as getting people to follow. Certainly, that is one idea. Yet, it is not the most important idea.

The most important idea may be the consideration of how you will navigate the environment, the culture, and set the example for everyone else. Then the following part develops more naturally. It isn’t forced.

Leadership Responsibility

Leadership is not as much about a position as it is about your behavior. Your position gives you a certain amount of authority. However, it is your behavior, even when no one appears to be watching, that gives you respect.

All eyes are on you when you are in a formal leadership role. Your boss, your peers, and even your direct reports. That isn’t everyone though, there may still be other employees, customers, and vendors who observe your behavior and style.

In today’s world and social climate, your authority often matters less. In addition to the observed behaviors it is about the relationships that you build.

The, “do it or die,” philosophy died long ago. Sure, there may still be pockets of that style of leadership. There may even be scenarios where that style is working. Yet, in the mainstream best practices approach, it is non-existent.

Workplace Navigation

Careful navigation is required. If you are in what may be labeled, middle management, you have important work.

You have to be able to bridge the gap between the front line and the C-Suite. Likely you won’t agree with everything. Likely you’ll face challenges, problems, and push back from both sides.

Winning is not about defeating the opponent, winning is about your careful and appropriate navigation. Being a bit diplomatic is a responsible and respectful approach.

Being a great leader is being a great navigator.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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customer service authority

Customer Service Authority, Do You Have It?

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Nearly every business will tell you that they are in business because of the customer. Whether business-to-business or business-to-consumer, people often believe it is true. However, customer service authority may be missing. Have you found this to be true?

Most organizations are built on the premise of growth. They seek the wealth and riches of a thriving customer base and strong reputation. They are building their brand.

Many mission statements include a mention of the customer. The question is, “What happens when the relationship is tested?”

Service Focus

I’ve heard so many stories of customer service strategy. Including stories of a hands-off strategy that insists the more attention you pay to a customer in crisis, the more they’ll ask for, so don’t pay so much attention. Indeed, that is seeing things through a different lens.

What really happens when your brand is tested? Do your CSR’s (customer service representatives) have the authority to manage the crisis?

Customer service is often referred to, or culturally thought of as a department or work group within the organization. In a literal sense, it may be truth, in a cultural sense, it shouldn’t be true.

Things are often great if the system is never tested. People can rave about the quality, craftsmanship, or attention to detail. They can insist that the service is, the best!

What happens when it is tested?

Customer Service Authority

Everything may be fine until tested. Everyone may agree that the organization cares, has their back, and stands behind their product or service. Until they don’t.

The service your organization provides is about cultural attributes, not a department. Your CSR’s represent all that the organization is, and does. Pretending doesn’t work, talk is cheap, and promises are sometimes broken.

The organization that grants high authority to the people who directly serve the customer, especially the customer in crisis, will have better service. If they don’t have the authority, perhaps the culture is missing its mark.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Change authority

Change Authority, Do You Need It?

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When you take a seat on the committee, board of directors, or task force do you have any authority? Working with your peers, serving the marketing team, or getting information from a different workplace department, do you have change authority?

Many people and employee teams will quickly suggest that they want change but how does change occur?

Change Authority

Some suggest that navigating the workplace environment and creating change only happens when you have the authority?

Other people may suggest that the person who chirps the loudest or most often drives change. They are the squeaky wheel.

There is at least one more camp. That is the camp that suggests the last person who speaks before a decision is made is the true champion of change.

Authority can certainly make things easier, at least on the surface. Command a change and people will likely respond, that is, if you have the authority. Hire, fire, or resource allocation authority will usually spark some action. Authority means power.

The squeaky wheel sometimes gets greased and the last person to speak sometimes seems to win.

What is the alternative?

Other Alternatives

Change often happens without authority. It often happens without complaining and blaming.

You don’t need authority, you don’t need to be the squeaky wheel, and you can skip the blame game.

Taking responsibility and initiative may spark change. You can start by providing positive contributions, offering alternatives, or getting involved through generous actions.

Not everyone quickly jumps on board with the idea of something new, but when it becomes an idea in action, it sometimes becomes a good idea.

Good ideas are a compelling. They bring about change through inspiration, curiosity, and group dynamics. They cause action.

No one forced social media, cell phones, or smart eating habits and exercise, yet they all get their fair share of action.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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