Tag Archives: respect

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ego stumble

Ego Stumble and Getting Out of Your Own Way

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Have you ever had an ego stumble? One of those cases where you let your emotions guide your choices and it didn’t end well?

Emotion is critical in the workplace. Passion is an emotion. So is the excitement of launching a new marketing campaign, closing the sale, or achieving the goal. Emotion is important, yet it can also go wrong.

One of the biggest problems in the workplace with harassment claims is that ego got in the way.

A problem between two peers and you may find that ego played a role.

Supervisor to direct report, or the opposite, direct report to supervisor, and ego’s may be involved.

Leading by Inspiring

Leading today in a social environment that is much less about authority and much more about inspiration can be challenging. Inspiration means emotion and emotions are sometimes difficult to navigate.

When you make a choice about attending the meeting, participating in the meeting, or workplace respect you can bet that ego is involved.

Ego may feel like the right choice. Consider supervisor to direct report interactions. The supervisor, who clearly has the authority should lead, right?

Most would quickly say, “Yes.” However, the way we lead today may look a little different. Leading should be more pull and less push.

Navigating social climates and workplace culture has never been more challenging. We sometimes label this experience, workplace politics.

Yes, workplace politics, many people don’t like that game.

Ego Stumble

Blowing off the meeting may be about ego. The same is true for who gets credit for the project, the promotion, or even who gets the pay raise.

Sometimes you have to get out of your own way.

Making waves with the new hire, or the old regime, may feel satisfying for the moment. Yet, leading is going to require buy-in and buy-in is created by shared experiences.

If what you are sharing is mismanaged conflict there will be fewer opportunities for your future.

Don’t get in your own way.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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leadership ego

The High Cost of Leadership Ego

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Ego has many faces. Sometimes it is blunt and obvious, other times it is disguised as a workplace objective.

Sometimes it goes unrecognized. Simple acts that derail workplace engagement, disable loyalty, and disregard simple respect. Is leadership ego getting in the way?

Leadership Ego

Here are some leadership actions that should speak louder than words:

  • Hiring low or under skilled employees. Apparent because there is no succession planning within the organization. Employees are tools.
  • Never getting your hands dirty. (It’s a metaphor.)
  • A new organizational leader bringing in talent from a previous employer. Often to illustrate that everyone wanted out and will gladly follow for a new (better) opportunity.
  • Introductions that include, “He works for me.”
  • Rules only apply if you get caught. Especially true for harassment, diversity, and ethics.

Some employees only want paychecks. Yet, humans are surprisingly motivated by purpose. Yes, a paycheck can be a purpose, but likely it is not the organizational purpose.

Ego Derails Respect

People are problem solvers. They want to fix, repair, and accomplish. They also have a universal truth, they want respect. Respect may be defined differently by everyone, but without respect they’re only working for a paycheck.

Perhaps nothing derails loyalty more. Show your employees that you don’t respect them and they won’t care about you or the organization. Their underground rule will be, “Every person for themselves.”

Leadership is not about authority. Yes, authority matters and can be helpful. No, authority is not what makes you a leader.

Employee turnover, lawsuits, and disengaged employees cost organizations millions each year. In addition, stuck organizations or those with very limited frames often cannot get out of their own way. Look to leadership and culture as a potential problematic area.

What costs more, good leadership or bad?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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respected employees

Respected Employees are Engaged

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Based on data from numerous surveys the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has often reported about the importance of respect in the workplace. Are respected employees more engaged?

Motivation and Engagement

When you start the discussion about motivation, positivity, and employee engagement you often hear about the money factor. Yes, money matters, and no, money is not everything.

The next factor that comes into play is the conversation about motivation being intrinsic or extrinsic. Does it come from within or does it come externally? If you really want to dig deep, you’ll also entertain the discussion point about the fundamental attribution error.

Cutting right to it, if you are a workplace leader you will assume some responsibility for a motivated and engaged workforce. Your team is not just motivated or not. The workplace climate and culture will matter.

Respected Employees

People are motivated by results, by a sense of accomplishment, pride, and how they are perceived by others. These and many other factors are directly linked to respect. There is more to motivation but respect is often overlooked or taken for granted.

Leadership egos sometimes get in the way of respect. This happens when leaders need (and take) credit for the work accomplished by their teams. It happens when the leader flexes her muscle by reminding others about their pecking order.

I’ve turned this organization around.

This is my secretary.

He works for me.

When you start to wonder about worker engagement you should start to question the impact of leadership egos. One of the most important aspects of leadership is effective self-assessment. Awareness is the first step for change.

Does respect matter to you?

-DEG

Do you need help bringing respect back into your workplace? Contact me.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Workplace thinking

Does Workplace Thinking Still Occur?

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Trying to think through the best path to close the customer deal is exhausting. It is too hard to remember the entire product line. I can’t forget to leave for the meeting at 2PM. Are you committed to workplace thinking or would you rather just brush it off?

Physical work can be tiring, so can intense mental effort.

When we listen to all the problems, the issues, and the drama, we may grow tired. Tired of thinking, tired of worrying, and tired of working.

Workplace Thinking

What we do cognitively can be exhausting so we sometimes brush it off. We ask questions, because we want quick responses that don’t require us to think.

Does Part A fit with Part B or do we need to sell Part C too?

What is the policy on blue jean Fridays?

Does our insurance cover a specialist without a referral from our regular doctor?

Likely, someone will answer. Sometimes people are too tired or lazy to find the answer for themselves. Certainly, helping seems like the right thing to do.

Our memory is important, and sometimes requires energy.

Remind me to lock the door before we leave today.

Don’t let me forget to send that customer order before 3:00 PM.

I have the meeting on my calendar for next week, which day is it?

Tired of Thinking

Our workloads, physical or cognitive, can tire us out. Some people will push harder, own the situation, and be considerate of the load on others. Yet others will try to dump that load on someone else.

We live in a World of creating more ease. Staples has an EASY button. We can order McDonald’s through an app, and we can watch our floor get vacuumed by a Rumba.

Does workplace thinking still occur? Do your teams have the energy, consideration, and respect for others, or are they just dumping work?

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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force respect

Can You Force Respect or Only Earn It?

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Respect is a commonality. Respect is something that nearly everyone wants yet often there is struggle to attain. Can you force respect?

People will do things for many different reasons. Fear is a big driver for action. We may fear future embarrassment if we don’t act, we may fear being removed from the team, or we may fear that we will be fired.

Short Game, Long Game

Motivation through fear is probably not a good idea for the long game. It works in the short game, but typically fails in effectively building relationships.

When the boss says, “We need to ship all of these orders today or corporate is going to close our facility.” that is a statement of fear. Certainly, it may spring people into action, but in the long game, it breaks down loyalty and commitment.

The feeling often becomes, “The Company doesn’t care about me, so I don’t care about the Company.”

Motivation and respect are often closely connected. You can insist someone must do something, and perhaps they will. What about respect, can you force respect?

Force Respect

I may not respect a hot stove, until I touch it. Telling me to respect it is valuable, but until I live it there may be some doubt.

Some people will give respect freely. Their values and beliefs direct them to respect first and obtain the supporting evidence later. In other cases, people may expect you to earn it, it is never just given.

How should you navigate this in the workplace?

You can try to force respect. However, it is likely an illusion. Respect works best when it is earned. It is part of the long game. It is a relationship built across time.

Forcing anything is a short run game.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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best customers

Best Customers Are Not Every Customer

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It is common, a new rule, something to prevent or curve off potential losses. Unfortunately, many businesses think about customer service as a department, a place that is the caretaker of rules. Be careful what you do to your best customers.

Every Customer

A good friend of mine is avid Harley Davidson guy. He dumps all his pocket change on playing with his Harley Davidson motorcycles. He is known at several dealerships and regularly drops a couple of hundred bucks on a visit.

Recently, he decided to order some new parts. The person at the parts counter explained that he needed to prepay. He never prepaid before.

The parts counter person advised, “It’s a new rule, all customers must prepay for non-stock items.”

He responded back, “Come on, you know I’m good for it.”

The counter person suggested that he didn’t make the rules, but that it applies to everyone.

My friend prepaid, he has the money. The problem is, he felt disrespected, he felt like there is mistrust, and the shop just weakened a previously very strong relationship.

Best Customers

I use a lot of printing services in my business.

My black and white copy business primarily goes to one vendor. It has been that way for many years. I send them a file via email, they know me by name and normally they have a good idea of the specs for my print job.

Recently, I had a job requirement that wasn’t normal, there was also a pending holiday. I wasn’t sure of their business hours or when the job would be finished. In addition to my normal email, I telephoned ahead for clarity.

When I arrived to pick up my finished order, I noticed a new sign. The sign read something like, “All print orders must be prepaid, no exceptions.” Yet, back on the shelf, clearly labeled with my name, my print job was complete and ready to go.

I felt respected. My order mattered. I was important to them and my years of being a good customer made a difference.

I’m not an average customer at the print shop, neither is my buddy at the Harley shop.

Remember your best customers, they are not every customer.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace engagement

Workplace Engagement Starts with Respect

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The chicken or the egg? Everyone wonders. Workplace engagement isn’t as challenging, but it may not always start in the manner that you think.

I didn’t like green beans as a kid, probably because they weren’t sweet enough. Today, I value their importance in a well-balanced diet and I’m sure to eat a few.

When it comes to the work at hand, people are often not sure whether they will like it or not. Can there be situations where after they explore it, check it out, and give it a try, they’re interested to do more?

Workplace Engagement

Engagement doesn’t always start with the notion that it will be fun and engaging, sometimes people grow into it.

It’s common for someone to dislike the new software release. “It’s awkward. Where is my old screen that showed everything near the top?”

The same is often true for the process change. “We’ve never done it this way. I don’t think this is going to work.”

Engagement doesn’t always start by making it attractive enough. It doesn’t always begin with confidence and a roaring stream of energy.

Sometimes engagement develops by getting ingrained in the process. Passion develops from the understood purpose. The feeling of accomplishment.

Many people want to understand that their work will make a difference, that it matters, and as people, they are needed and valued because it does.

Connect with Respect

Dressing up or sugar coating that there is work to be done and let’s get motivated about it doesn’t guarantee engagement. In fact, once that excitement wears off, people are waiting for you to excite them again. And bigger this time.

Respect will go a long way towards the gratitude of the offer for work to be done. Consider, “We could sure use your expertise on this one.”

Engagement forms when there is a connection to the contribution. It all starts with respect.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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customer service better appreciative strategies

3 Reasons to Make Customer Service Better

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Everyone is a critic. People are often critical about customer service when they are expecting to receive. What if everyone worked to make customer service better?

One of my professional speaking colleagues has a slogan, “Because we can!” Jeffrey Hayzlett, is a professional speaking rock star and I love his slogan.

While I believe the intent of Jeffrey’s slogan to be motivational and inspirational from the aspect of hard work, determination, and relentless pursuit, it might be applicable in other ways too.

Make Customer Service Better

Should our personal and professional interactions with other people have more customer service flair? Can we make customer service better? Sometimes I think so and other times I know so.

Here are three great reasons why we should:

  1. Fair. Sometimes it just seems like life isn’t fair. If we can help balance the scale, right the wrongs and turn things around why shouldn’t we? An even better question might be, why wouldn’t we? If there is a shortcoming, make it better. Make it fair.
  2. Generosity. Certainly the bottom line is important and any business transaction should be two-way, not just one. Can your offer be more generous? Will generosity cause more reciprocation? In a world that would benefit from improved customer service, I think being more generous is part of the process.
  3. Respect. It seems that recently there is a lot of chatter about respect. Respect across the generations, respect in political circles, and certainly respect to our customers. Time, value, and money they are all important and let’s not forget that we should deliver with the utmost respect.

Because We Can

In business, we often size up the competition to see what they are doing. We consider their offers, value, and price. Competition might drive us to do things because we feel that we have to.

What if we did it for a different reason? Imagine if we changed the philosophy.

Should we make customer service better?

I think yes, because we can!

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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boost your career

Boost Your Career With Customer Service Skills

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There is considerable chatter about differences across the workforce generations. Many consider respect as problematic. Some connect respect with customer service. Regardless of your generation, one way to boost your career is with customer service mastery.

Many people believe that they know the art of exceptional customer service. No doubt, customer service skills are not hard to know or understand. The real challenge with customer service is more about culture, habits, and traditions.

Boost Your Career

Do you want to boost your career? Do you really, really want to boost your career? One of the best social skills you can master is being a leader with delivering exceptional customer service.

It is simple and here are three steps to consider:

  1. Ask yourself, “How can I give more to this situation?” You need to be thinking things like ease of use, value, or even general kindness. Having good manners, being respectful, and demonstrating that you care will go a long way.
  2. Focus on needs. You have to discover the needs of the person or organization. You do this by asking questions and being an exceptional listener. Then your goal is to make your delivery exceptional and memorable. So much so, they will want more.
  3. Replicate. Everyone knows that practice makes perfect. Remember the concept of customer service is easy. Having exceptional habits of customer service is typically more difficult. Learn and understand the basics. Practice them every time. Make them become habits.

If customer service is so simple, why is there so much turmoil around its delivery? The answer is also simple. Customer service requires thought, action, and a set of behaviors to develop as habits. Many people forget their role or are not engaged enough to care.

Customer Service Mastery

If you want to boost your career, master the concepts and deliver exceptional customer service. Not just on the job, but everywhere.

It is for all generations.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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likability builds relationships

How Likability Builds Relationships and Represents Leadership

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Have you thought about how likability builds relationships?

Recently I was lost for words when a business associate asked me about the results of meeting I had with an executive they had provided as a referral. After stumbling and fumbling for a moment I said, “Let me just say that Emotional Intelligence training might be helpful.”

While I’m not in the habit of being critical of people, I definitely felt a little frustration during my conversation with the aspiring executive.

Normally it is the kind of discovery I want to have, because I can often help. However it is sometimes challenging when the person who writes the check is really the problem and they absolutely don’t see it that way.

Likability On Your Radar

I wouldn’t say that the gentleman was totally unlikable. I understand how he might think he is doing his job, but my guess is that much of the team is not very fond of him. He is the kind of leader that when asked about being likable, he would say, “I’m not here to win a popularity contest.”

The single most important message that I can share with any aspiring leader is that you need to care about being likable.

Certainly that doesn’t mean that every decision you make or direction you turn will be popular. It does mean that you need to have likability on your radar.

Likability Builds Relationships

Whether it is with your team or with vendors, customers, or other stakeholders here are a few things that will help improve your likability:

  1. Be Positive. Sometimes miserable people like to connect with other miserable people, but leaders need to be inspirational. Always maintain a positive outlook. Inspire faith in the process, share plans and actualize the vision. Light the path.
  2. Show Empathy. Demonstrating caring and concern helps connect people emotionally. It doesn’t mean choices are made from fear or sympathy, it does mean that people know you care and understand.
  3. Stay Humble. Arrogance really shows ignorance. Your position doesn’t mean you can push people around. It really means that you have to serve harder, care more, and understand people.
  4. Listen Well. Chances are good that the most likable relationships are built by those who talk less and listen more. Listening is a skill. It’s different from hearing sounds or voices. Listen to understand.
  5. Connect. Never try to shove your way around. Pushy and authoritarian isn’t a relationship, but it might be bullying. In the workplace your best people are connected to their work by purpose. Build bridges not towers.

Practice

When it comes to building relationships you become what you practice. Being likable is important for any relationship but don’t confuse likability with popularity.

In leadership roles adhering to your responsibilities might not always be the most popular, but they should always be respectful.

Respect is earned. Leadership is a skill. Likability builds relationships.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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