Tag Archives: boomers

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Why Boomer CEO’s Are In A Hurry

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In business everything is moving very fast, but for the C-Level baby boomer it probably isn’t fast enough. Is the baby boomer CEO really in a hurry?

senior business man with his team at office

Business leaders always need to face the reality of external pressure. Economic conditions, in some cases government regulations, and most certainly changes in technology are all putting pressure on organizational performance.

All C-Level executives have concerns about the value of time. The CFO eats, breathes, and sleeps with thoughts about the TMV, and those responsible for operations and sales are trying to get 90 seconds out of every minute.

As they develop strategy and create strategic plans they are always connecting the amount of time with resource requirements.

You get it. Most business owners and C-Level executives face this reality every day, it’s certainly nothing new.

Have you ever considered what drives the vision for a millennial leader as compared with that of a baby boomer?

Sure both recognize the need for performance and that there is an element of time associated with that performance, but is there a difference in their perception of urgency? Absolutely and here are a few reasons why.

  • Perception of time. Ask a 30 year old executive what is personally most important for their career in the next 5 to 10 years, and then ask a 55 year old executive the same question. You might be, but shouldn’t be, surprised with the differences in their response.
  • Values and beliefs. Generational differences are real. The life experiences, values, and belief systems are shaped differently for earlier generations as compared with the most recent. Many factors contribute to shaping these differences but there are notable differences, and they are not just about age.
  • Visions of legacy. While legacy seems like a big bold word, the characteristics of what it means are prevalent in the mind of the traditional or boomer C-Level executive. In contrast, the personal goals and objectives for a millennial are often not based on any connection with legacy. They don’t see a finish line, just a lot of space to accomplish more.

So why are boomer CEO’s in more of a hurry?

You can make the argument that all C-Level executives have an impressive resume. However, for the millennial executive the book of accomplishments (metaphorically) is still in the early chapters, with the end unknown and not in sight. There is still time.

On the other hand the boomer C-Level executive will likely have enough content to fill their book, but at this stage they are really most concerned about bringing together the last couple of chapters. As they see it, their window of opportunity is closing.

Most important of all, the boomer executive wants their book to be a best seller.

– DEG

Are you hungry for additional C-Level resources? The C-Suite Network has something for you.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Boomers to Millennials, Comfort Slows Progress

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If asked, many people would probably agree that one of the things they look forward to in life is to be comfortable. Work hard, study hard, be disciplined, be persistent, stay motivated, be committed, the list is long. The desired outcome might be to earn more money, have a better life and most of all, create some comfort.

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In business, one of the worst things that can happen is to become comfortable. By definition comfort may indicate that you are becoming more relaxed, are satisfied, or perhaps taking a rest. A business that lacks drive, determination, or becomes comfortable is probably a business that is falling behind, losing market share, or in one way or another slowly (or rapidly) being outperformed through the creative use of technology.

Traditionals and baby boomers are often associated with the stereotype of being technology adverse, in contrast younger generations including generation X, millennials, and generation Z are more typically associated with a desire for technology, but who is really the most comfortable? Those avoiding technology (comfort) or those encouraging it (comfort)? According to a recent article by Thomas D. Williams, PH.D., Pope Francis recently spoke to 1.5 million young people urging them “to resist the temptation of a passive life of comfort and entitlements.”

Are millennials more comfortable than boomers? What is your story? Are you comfortable, comfortable in your job, your business, or life?

Generational differences often become validated by those who have the loudest voice. People of any generation, or every generation, will see the world based on their interactions with it.

I believe one thing is certain; comfort slows progress, every time.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Can Boomers Lead Generation Z?

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Considering there are now five generations active in our workforce it seems reasonable that reaching across three, four, or five generations will represent some challenge. I am often asked questions about how to change the incoming workforce, not how to address the problems, but how to change the people.

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Reaching across the generations is complex, but approaching it with the intent to improve relations and not change people is where most of the engagement value exists. It may start with the questions we ask ourselves, and it definitely needs to work towards improving the root cause.

The root cause of our generational differences often develops from leadership style, communication, and organizational culture. Changing our approach should begin with focusing on the commonalities that we share. When we have a successful organization or business it is because we provide products or services that add value or solve problems. Since we’re all in it together, that is one important factor we all have in common.

We should be asking ourselves questions like this:

What is our purpose? Motivation to jump in and get started happens when everyone understands their sense of purpose and contribution. Doing the task is one thing, but understanding why provides the motivation. This is our mission.

What problem are we trying to solve? Most organizations are in the business of fixing, reducing, or improving problems. They fulfill a need and provide value or a solution. Everyone’s contribution should be related to meeting this exact need.

How does what we are doing solve that problem? If we can’t identify the results or establish the metrics or measurement, we’ll likely have trouble with employee engagement. Everything should have an identifiable result and outcome.

When we stop trying to change people and start focusing on the commonalities of our mission, people of every generation will work better together. We may have differences such as values and beliefs, social orientation, and technology competence, but keep this in mind; the value of the team doesn’t exist in everyone being the same. The value of the team exists in utilizing everyone’s knowledge and experience to solve the problem or accomplish the goal.

When leaders forfeit the strength of differences across the generations they have forfeited the value of the team.

Yes, boomers can lead (Gen 9/11, iGen) generation z.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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change resistors

Change Resisters–Boomers or Millennials?

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Many boomers believe millennials resist change. Many millennials believe boomers resist change. Who is correct? Could it be neither?

Consider the following three ideas:

Pace of Technology – Millennials and Generation 9/11 will likely experience more technology advancements and change during their lifetime as compared to boomers. The pace of technology driving change appears to be accelerating.

To-date Reality – At any given moment in time, earlier generations have experienced the most change. After all, they have more years of experience and have lived what everyone from recent generations has lived, plus everything before those generations. (A 55 year old has 25 more years of experience as compared to a 30 year old, but both have experienced the most recent 30 years.)

Saturation – Consider that everyone has a tolerance for the volume or quantity of change, and as many may suggest, differing levels of interest for change. If this is true, it only makes sense that earlier generations have experienced more and may not be as tolerant of, or interested in, change.

Popular wisdom among change experts is that change resistance has little or nothing to do with generations. During a change event nearly everyone, or anyone, may feel a loss of control and a push (or shove) from their comfort zone. It is this uneasy, nervous, and fearful feeling that often causes resistance, couple that with those who have an opposing view and you have the perfect storm for change resistance.

While generational differences may be inclusive of some change resistance, they are typically not the root cause.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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