Tag Archives: work from home

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rewriting work

Rewriting Work, It Is Happening All-Around You

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Many workplaces are confused about what the future of work looks like. Are you rewriting work as you once knew it?

Lacking a robot, a painter scheduled to paint your house or your front porch is going to have to show up.

Currently, the same is true for someone cutting your lawn, maintaining your pool, or delivering a package.

Does it have to be this way?

Perhaps in some cases it will be this way until more robotics gain traction. Right now, there are many things that require a human to physically show up. What about you, do you have to show up?

Like it or not, much of our traditional workplace work is being rewritten.

There are arguments about the value of face-to-face, live in-person interactions when compared with virtual, video-based interactions. This argument will probably continue for some time, but should it?

What is really necessary?

Truly, remove some of the traditional mental barriers and consider, are there alternatives?

As people adapt more and more with video-based interaction is there a need for live, in-person?

Many office-oriented jobs, probably don’t require in-person on a daily basis. Most everyone is retreating to an office or cubicle once leaving the coffee station anyway.

Rewriting Work

Having a remote workforce (work from home, WFH, telework) is truly a game-changer if it is embraced.

It doesn’t mean that there are not meetings. It doesn’t mean that there are no interactions. Absolutely, it does not mean that there are not goals, metrics, and performance measurements.

It does mean that office space requirements are reduced, it means that long commutes, traffic, and the risk associated with going to a physical location are minimized or eliminated.

Consider that it means the stress and fatigue associated with those traditional endeavors are gone, or at least significantly reduced.

It means that some interpersonal dynamics and difficult personalities take a new shape. There is less room for drama and who cares if Sally is wearing pink flip-flops or bunny ear slippers?

What is the energy and output gain for the employer?

Leaders are actually going to have to lead, not just occupy a position of so-called power.

Performance will be based on productivity and work accomplished, not on occupying office space for a set number of hours.

In a world fighting for diversity, empathy, and new rules; your traditional job may need to be rewritten.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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work from home confidence

Work From Home Confidence, Do You Have It?

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We all recognize the disruption and the some of the associated changes. Are you or your team working remotely? Do you have work from home confidence?

Any time we have change, we may have some discomfort. Along with that discomfort we may find our anxiety levels creeping up. When we are anxious, we typically don’t listen as well. We often don’t perform at our best, and in severe cases sometimes people can’t really perform at all.

Employee Performance

It may seem difficult to believe but many people are finding increased challenges with working from home.

Employers and managers worry about productivity, efficiency, and results.

Employees may experience various forms of motivation. Some increases perhaps, and some decreases.

The psychology of work shifts. Some people become more efficient with fewer interruptions. Others, well, they feel extreme guilt if they grab a coffee or step away from their work at home desk.

We also can’t forget about the ability to let go. When you leave your home and go to a different work space, it is also easy to pack up and go back home. When you leave, you leave work. Not always as easy when working from home.

Work From Home Confidence

As people we are observers. We are fill in the blank people. As we observe, we make assumptions.

Sometimes when you are having a good day, you don’t understand why someone else is not. When you’re having a not so good day, you wonder how everyone can be so cheery.

It is all based on assumptions.

On initial observation many believe that working from home is a dream job. In practice, it may not be.

As a manager, an employee, or a business owner, keep in mind that what you are experiencing may not be the same as what others are experiencing.

Find more compassion and make sure your team is working hard to avoid anxiety traps.

Confidence in the work that they do and the associated results matter. It matters for everyone.

Build up your team with the use of effective metrics and measurements. Congratulate positive results.

You can help.

And it will make a difference.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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project micromanagement

Project Micromanagement and Associated Costs

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Working remotely isn’t business as usual, only in a different place. It requires some different skills. Especially management skills. Are you dishing out project micromanagement?

Ask around, no one seems like the concept of being micromanaged. In some cases, managers will tell you it has become a necessity due in-part to poor performance.

I’ve even had people argue that micromanagement is actually more efficient than a more strategic approach to management and oversight.

Micromanagement is never more efficient, it’s a time waster for everyone.

It is a tactical approach, and is not strategic.

It costs more.

Project Micromanagement

Whether you are working closely together in a physical setting, or you’ve had to change things up a bit to accommodate the social distancing standards, project management skills matter.

Certainly, there are technical applications to project management, but largely that is not what I’m referencing. What you may want to consider is your basic habits and approaches to managing work.

Many employee teams are accustomed to completing their work to the eighty percent level. Leaving out about twenty percent of the really hard stuff. They turn in the assignment and then wait for management to ask for revisions or modifications to the work.

Employees who have been closely monitored learned a long time ago that spending extra time to perfect their work only results in having a supervisor critique the assignment causing additional work.

In response, they’ve cut back, and stopped trying so hard. Instead they do a minimum requirement, turn it in, and wait for feedback.

Cases like this are abundant. Supervisors and direct reports alike are pushing work back and forth costing time and wasting energy.

It is a form of micromanaging a project. Tactical, but not strategic.

A Better Practice

Instead, management teams, especially teams working remotely, should consider teaching the strategic aspects of the knowledge and skill requirements.

This in turn will create a culture of employee teams who deliver completed work. Not drafty assignments that waste time.

The psychology of work is largely shared within the culture. However, the culture across different work environments may shift both expectations and performance indicators.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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work from home

Webinar: Mastering Your Work From Home Environment

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Mastering Your Work From Home Environment

Starts in:

Your disrupted work environment may feel like starting a new job. You don’t know where to begin, how to get started, and how to prove your value and worth. All while demonstrating your capabilities and commitment to the team. This live virtual training will help you get the most from each work day and be highly-productive while minimizing the disruption.

Work from home may sound like a dream job to some, yet the expectations and accountability bring about a new twist. Demonstrating your skills and building continued trust with co-workers and supervisors has never been more important.

 

anticipated expectations

 

This 90-minute live webinar will help you:

  • End the feeling of disconnection from your team
  • Explore communication tactics for working remotely
  • Become an energized self-starter
  • Position your environment and plan your workday
  • Ensure accountability and trust for your performance

and more…

 

work from home

 

 

Where: From your own device. For best results you’ll utilize a webcam type device (and speakers) to connect into the seminar. Optionally, you can listen in and interact through questions without a video connection.

When: April 15, at 10:00 AM Eastern Time (US)

Who: This live virtual training is appropriate for anyone responsible to work from home while also navigating team commitment and accountability in a disrupted work environment.

 

This virtual (Zoom) seminar will be presented by business consultant and national level speaker, Dennis Gilbert.

Dennis Gilbert

 

“I delivered my first live, on-line virtual training program in 2009. Much changed since then, and the content and delivery is now better than ever. Make no mistake, this program is not a freebie teaser. It is a specially developed live virtual training (webinar) that is jam packed with tips, techniques, and most of all, value.” – Dennis

 

Cost: $99 per participant

 

Register Now $99 $79

Register Now

Thanks for looking and for supporting small businesses!


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workforce disruption

Workforce Disruption and Working From Home

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Certainly, for many, there has been a workforce disruption. For all the businesses and organizations attempting to navigate this pandemic environment, what has changed?

Some have faced tremendous change. They are busy beyond belief. Others have closed doors, either by government pressure or because of a lack of business.

It seems likely the biggest category is somewhere in the middle. Larger organizations are struggling to find the right path and smaller ones are examining how to get by without the horsepower of a larger operation.

This middle group likely faces the most unknown’s and deciding how they will navigate leaves their workforce wondering about their fate.

Popular wisdom suggests a good number of people who have not been displaced by the disruption are in some form, working from home.

Workforce Disruption

Working from home is not the same as being at work only now you are working in a different location. The psychology behind this change affects both the supervisor and the direct report.

Communication has changed, work hours are different, and the normal ways of doing business are of course, disrupted.

The supervisor who led by face-to-face observation is now feeling uneasy about the tasks ahead. The direct report who always waited on the supervisor to guide and steer their daily work is impacted by not knowing or understanding what to do next. Precious time is lost, productivity drops, and without precise metrics and measurements outcomes are unknown.

Working from home, for the supervisor and the direct report, requires a different approach from a conventional workplace.

Communication must be more concise than ever, accountability and responsibility shifts, and trust will be the competitive edge in the battle to the top, or the race to the bottom.

-DEG

Recently, I’ve launch two programs targeted specifically for helping individuals and teams navigate the disruption and work more effectively remotely or in work from home (WFH) environments. Check out Managing Remote Work Teams and Mastering Work From Home.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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work from home

5 Tips To Help You Work From Home

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There are some people who just realized their dream opportunity. Largely, this sudden shift may feel more like a nightmare to many people. Are you prepared to work from home?

More or less I have worked from home for the past 14 years. I’ve had part-time offices out of my home and spent many hours onsite at client locations. However, when I’m grinding out new content, writing, studying, and preparing for deliveries, I’m often at home.

Work From Home

First, let me say that there are pros and cons. I spent over 20 years working in conventional workplace settings. I definitely recognize both sides of this story.

Solitude can drive you mad. Yes, it seems kinda cool at first, but after some time you miss the interactions and sometimes the climate of a face-to-face team. There is also no one immediately available to bounce ideas off of, except for your plant or a family pet.

Let me jump right in. Here are five tips to help you get started, stay productive, and not feel like you’re totally alone.

  1. Set a schedule. Planning to do things when you get around to it is probably a bad idea. If you’re planning to do some wash, run the vacuum, or get a snack for the kids you are best to plan around a schedule. A schedule keeps you focused during high energy times of the day and helps you avoid time sucking distractions. Productivity is going to be important so set a schedule.
  2. Prepare a work space. A home office is ideal. However, you can also use your kitchen island, a coffee table, or a stand up desk by using your ironing board. Your best work is going to occur if you can establish a place to setup and keep it somewhat permanent. Using your laptop on your recliner may work for processing some email but your best work is going to occur from a little bit more rigid work space.
  3. Block out distractions. It may feel pretty cool to have the news on the TV, or be jamming to music so loud that the neighbors can hear it, but these are largely distractions. While everyone is different and some will think that they work better with these distractions I encourage you to think twice. Every time you pause to think about something else, something different, or throw in the next load of laundry you are wasting time and more importantly energy.
  4. Take some breaks. A break is not necessarily a distraction. It can be an energizer. It can also be very healthy both emotionally and physically. Your best-case scenario is to plan your breaks. Set a timer and forget about it until you are alerted. You could take break every hour or every two or three. They are important and don’t skip too many.
  5. Teamwork. If you you’re working remotely with a team a great energizer is to plan for team calls or video chats. One way is to plan a call for every two hours. The team quickly assembles at the appropriate time and in a round-robin approach you take turns talking about what you accomplished since you last spoke and what you plan to accomplish in the next time slot. This call should last no more than 15 minutes. It is a quick huddle, and energizer, and a great way to hold each other accountable.

Working from home is just that, it’s work. Yes, you may be able to dress down a bit and yes, you may have some additional flexibility but there is still plenty of work to be done so don’t coast.

-DEG

You may also be interested in the Managing Remote Work Teams or Master Your Work From Home Environment webinar(s).

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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social distancing

Social Distancing and Motivation for Working Alone

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Suddenly, you’re working from home, or working in a more isolated environment. Social distancing is one of the talking points of the day. Has it impacted you?

Office staff can work from home.

We’re rearranging working arrangements on premises, everyone must spread out.

Employees required to report on premises should attempt to stay at least six feet apart.

How are you navigating?

It is certainly a different World at the moment.

Solitude

Some people may be saying, “Finally, I can get some work done without interruptions.”

That may seem pretty special. Even inviting, for a few days. However, eventually the solitude starts to set in.

It’s the little conversations you miss. The people, the interactions, and especially the drive and motivation to roll up your sleeves and dig in.

We’re lucky we have technology. Right now, there is an opportunity for technology to really shine.

Have you considered the possibilities?

Social Distancing

Jump into some social possibilities. Launch a Skype call, a Google Hangout, or work groups through Zoom.

Are you concerned about managing a remote staff?

There are some interesting differences and some clever ways to bring a new twist to being a supervisor. If you need some help, I’ve launched a 90-minute webinar happening on March 26, 2020.

Don’t sit on your hands. Take some moments to collect your thoughts.

Establish a plan, schedule an on-line meeting, have periodic check-ins, and talk about your game plan for the next hour or two. Circle back and compare notes. See who accomplished the most or who is getting left behind. Help each other.

It is amazing what we can do together.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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