Tag Archives: vision

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winning vision

Winning Vision for the Work You Do

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Nearly everyone believes they have a winning vision. Except for those who willingly admit that they really don’t have a vision at all.

Organizational or career vision often comes in two distinct flavors. Short-term or long-term. Sure, there are variants of either and some visionary behaviors may exist somewhere in the middle.

What is your vision and is it winning?

Short-term vision

On the short-term side people strive to win at all costs and do it as quickly as possible.

They’re often looking for the shortcut, the corners to cut, and the fast track. This angle exists, sometimes, but it also has residues or side effects from the behavior that drives it. Often, it is analyzed (or scrutinized) through the continuum of ethics.

More pressure driven by short-term goals or immediate gratification push people towards the high-risk side of ethical behavior. Trust is tested or harmed and the underground climate often appears more corrupt than it does transparent.

Long-term Vision

The other side of course, is a longer-term path. This path also recognizes the constraints of time, but on this path, time is viewed as more of an asset than it is an expense.

This scenario often wins because it is more patient and calculated with less irresponsible risk. Urgency is as much about doing things right as it as about how long it takes.

This climate is typically well respected and is tastefully seasoned with integrity.

Winning Vision

Fifty-two sprints are not equal to a marathon. The thought may be, what we can do fast must be better than what we can endure.

It’s unlikely.

The vision you have for your career, your team, or the entire organization will have outcomes based on the cultural aspects created by leadership.

How do you apply cultural values to your vision?

You can lead. There is still room for more leadership.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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difficult change

Why Your Difficult Change Is Not Impossible

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Change sometimes feels impossible. The obstacles too big, the chances too small, and the time required not worth it. Confronting a difficult change is not impossible when you have a good plan.

What is your plan?

Where to Start

When we need to straighten up the closet, clean out the garage, or make a positive change in our life or career we may decide that we don’t know where to start.

Not knowing where to start doesn’t mean the change is impossible. It doesn’t necessarily mean the odds are stacked against you. Time may be required but appropriate patience and balance will bring it to fruition.

Too often people stop before they get started. They visualize the obstacles, the roadblocks, and the pain and effort required. The gap seems too broad or the road too long.

Difficult Change

There are three simple rules to learning how to get started and how to make a difficult change become a reality.

  1. Vision. A well-defined vision or goal works best. What will things look like in the end? What does it feel like and where will you be? Tidying up a closet is different from discarding eighty percent of the contents.
  2. Steps. When we see the challenge in steps it helps bring the reality to life. The bigger picture is sometimes too far away, it feels impossible. For the closet, we may consider one shelf at a time, or hanging items first. Apply this same logic to any change.
  3. Persistence. Many people talk with me about writing a book. They just don’t know where to start. By creating a vision and breaking it into steps they are underway. Replicating a little effort each day or each week adds up. In the early stages, count accomplishments more than the gap, as the gap closes shift reflection to what remains.

There is a big difference between difficult and impossible.

Leaping across the Grand Canyon in a single bound may be impossible. Getting to the other side is not.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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awaiting change

Awaiting Change or Making Change Happen?

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What will be different today? Will something change? Many people feel excited about the possibility. They are awaiting change.

Is this what will spark change or do we have to engage deeper, in a more meaningful way?

Constant Change

Most would agree that we are in a World of constant and rapid change. Some live for this exhilarating feeling, others want to climb back into their box.

On the other hand, many people and businesses feel stuck, trapped, or worse, going backwards.

We are all responsible for change. Change seems to happen more when the reason for change is clear. When there is purpose, direction, and vision.

Awaiting Change

One trouble spot often is, people are just waiting. They are waiting to be inspired, waiting to connect with what matters to them, and looking for clear vision, a roadmap they can follow.

Today perhaps we’re all marketers. We all must sell, promote, and create connection. Like it or not, we’re in a connection economy. As the digital age shoves more data in front us things don’t get clearer, they get more nebulous.

In a fuzzy world, we resort to instinct, our instinct resorts to trust. We ask someone.

The testimonial is more important now than ever. The people you meet, they have value. What they say will have impact on your direction. When we listen, we’re building our own vision.

What To Do

Ask yourself, “What would the savvy marketer do?”

Launch a new OOH campaign, engage with video, build an incredible and resourceful website? One thing is certain, they are going to try to connect with emotion, a purpose, and a vision.

When you recognize what matters most and stop waiting you’ll start changing.

Connect yourself or your team with authenticity, respect, and high ethical standards. Maybe it is what people are waiting for. Maybe it is what matters the most.

Stop waiting, start connecting, promote the vision, and listen. Things will change.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Creating Outcomes Is Exactly What We’re All Doing

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Are you responsible for your own fate? Are you being positive about what the future holds for you? In your life or career, do you feel like you are creating outcomes?

Most people probably do this much more than they realize. Their mindset directs what happens next.

Someone coughs. “Stop spreading your germs! I better not get sick.”

Traffic is backed up. “I knew this would happen.”

Sales are down. “The marketing plan was a bad idea from the start.”

Our Vision

We get more assignments when we attend the meeting. The phone rings as soon as we get engaged in our work. We nearly the finish the project and then the boss decides it isn’t needed anyway.

It happens to us when we don’t get the job. Perhaps when the weather takes a turn we don’t like. And, it especially happens when we feel overwhelmed.

Is it coincidence, is it fate, or just bad luck?

Expectations

We get more of what we expect. Yet we’ll argue that we would never, ever, do that. In fact, we may even argue that we are being positive but bad things keep happening.

Do you talk about what’s positive? Do you recite the feeling you had when you closed the sale, drove straight through without traffic, or felt pretty good after a brisk walk? This is option one.

Option two is talking about the coworker that appears to be goofing off, how you were running a few minutes late and then traffic was at a standstill. Or, perhaps you’ll mention the scratchy feeling in your throat and worry about an oncoming sickness.

Creating Outcomes

Life isn’t always as complex as it seems to be. Creating outcomes is what we do. It all starts with our vision.

When we expect a bad day. We’ll find a reason to see a bad day. Do this repetitively and we’ll develop confidence that our vibes are correct. Our intuition is our guide and we trust it.

All of this affirms that you get what you look for, and what you look for is what you’ll get.

Stop telling everyone what went wrong. Look for what worked, what went right, what is a win. You’re not bragging, you’re not narcissistic, you are turning your life around.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+

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perfect plan

Creating a Perfect Plan or Failure

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Most great efforts happen when there is a plan. Do you have a vision? Have you invested in creating the perfect plan?

Some people, and businesses, try to launch without a plan. Their plan is to go with the flow, let things unfold, take unknown risk or never consider the probability of success.

Risk of Failure

Why would anyone want to launch without a plan? Part of the challenge for why this occurs may exist in the idea that plains can fail. Even the best constructed plains may not turn out exactly as desired.

This may create an underlying fear, apprehension, worry, and avoidance. Who wants to be responsible for a plan that didn’t work?

Yet there are many other people and businesses who have realized that while plans work, they often don’t. This isn’t a surprise, in fact, it may be a realization that becomes part of the plan.

On any given day most people don’t know exactly what traffic will be like on their commute. Businesses don’t know who will call, who may postpone, or what equipment may break.

The emergency room at the local hospital exists and serves because they have planned for the unplanned. They don’t know what the next shift will bring. Who will arrive, how many, or with what problems.

Perfect Plan

Perhaps the secret to creating the perfect plan exists not in what you’ll do to execute the plan, but what you’ll do when things go astray.

Planning for the unplanned may be the hardest part of the plan. It is difficult to know how much, how many, and whether to embrace or deny.

A few things are guaranteed when you create the perfect plan. Perfect plans will encounter setbacks, delays, and hidden costs. People in the system will need more time, get bored, or skip town.

Revenue goals or funding streams will be missed or worse, stop altogether.

Your vision and plan are important. Equally important is what you’ll do and how you’ll react to imperfection.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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tactics more important

Are Tactics More Important Than Goals?

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Developing and executing a good strategy is important. So is avoiding tactical firefighting approaches. What will get you to where you want to be? Are tactics more important than goals?

Strategy, Vision, and Goals

One of the most important concepts for creating individual or team success is to have a good strategy, a clear vision, and appropriate goals to get you there.

At the same time, it is important to recognize that having any of those, or all of them, won’t create the end result you’re looking for. You’ll need well executed tactics.

Ask three busy workplace professionals about their day and there is a good chance one of them will tell you that they were busy fighting fires. Fighting fires is a tactical approach to fix whatever pops up. This is a bad habit to get into, but you still need tactics.

When I help groups with formulating strategy we always develop tactics that will lead them to their vision or goal. Having a vision and strategy isn’t what gets you there, it is the tactics that get you there. This is not tactical firefighting though. There is a difference.

Here is how this breaks down. You have a vision or goal, where you want to be. Then you need a strategy for how you will get to that goal. Next in line are the tactics that you will use to pursue that strategy that will take you to the goal.

Sounds pretty simple right? The challenge might be that people often confuse the level of importance for goals as compared to tactics. You can have a fantastic goal. You can even have a fantastic strategy, but without the continued tactical pursuit, you just won’t get there.

Tactics More Important

Are tactics more important than goals? Think of tactics as your daily habits. A collection of good habits might be exactly what is necessary to get you to your goal.

Don’t slip into a habit of fighting fires and don’t have a vision and strategy without tactics.

Tactics might be the most important. Your daily tactics produce your results, with or without specific goals.

Reminds me of the fundamentals of computing, lesson one, garbage in, garbage out.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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unprepared leaders

Do Unprepared Leaders Have The Best Vision?

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We’re often taught that preparation is the best practice and to always be prepared. Good idea, but do unprepared leaders have the best vision?

The question might become, “If we are prepared for everything are we underachieving?” Is there enough risk, or is there too little?

Being Prepared

People are surprised if they get a flat tire, but most of them are prepared. Rain in the forecast and we might take an umbrella, just so we are prepared. Called to the boss’s office unexpectedly might make us concerned and flustered but we still try to prepare.

Some might argue it is instinctual, but being prepared is more likely to be a learned behavior.

Leaders especially should prepare. Yet, often there is argument that having a backup plan is really just a plan to fail.

I’m a firm believer in being prepared. I prepare for client meetings, training events, and keynote speeches. There is a double check, triple check, and often I rehearse for timing and eloquence. I have back up plans, more content, less content, and a vision for what it all will look like.

Still, I never know what might happen next. What questions will be asked? Who might be in the audience? Who will agree or who will disagree?

Are you always completely prepared? Prepared enough that you are prepared for the unexpected?

Unprepared Leaders

What about the leader that pushes the process, the strategy, and the vision to a level that no one knows what will happen next? Might this provide the most meaningful balance of risk and reward?

In the 1960’s we dove head first into a space race, were we completely prepared? Privately funded projects are planning to send humans to Mars, is everyone completely prepared?

It seems to me that this is where the magic exists. It exists in the moments where no matter how prepared you are you’ll still never know what might happen next.

Does the leader that goes beyond the realm of the known have the best vision of all, or are they simply unprepared?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Coaching Yourself to Achieve Your Next Goal

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There are large numbers of people who chit-chat about their next goal. They have some ideas, talk about them, and perhaps give some fuzzy deadlines. Will coaching yourself work?

coaching yourself

Goal setting helps with vision. When you move forward step-by-step you are taking action. Action creates results, and you’ll need to actualize your vision.

Whenever you set a goal and actually put your body, mind, and heart behind it your chances of accomplishing something increases, dramatically. What sometimes stops people is that you also increase the chance of failure, setbacks, and disappointment.

Goal setting can sometimes be kind of funny. The bigger your vision the easier it is to make an excuse to quit. Better yet (actually worse yet) you might choose to just never get started in the first place. Sometimes people would just rather not face any disappointment and stay stuck.

Coaching Yourself

Here are a few points to keep in mind as you pursue any goal:

  • Make it realistic. What can you do to start the process moving forward? Monitor baby steps. Allow enough time.
  • Put time on your side. Disappointment often sets in because we hear about flash diets, short cuts, and quick fixes. There are none, be patient.
  • Be sincere with yourself. “I think I can,” is different from “I will do this.” If you want to program yourself to get there, don’t use wiggle words.
  • Focus on the next step. Sure you want to see the finish line, but you’ll never get there without the next step. If you only look towards the finish you leave room for doubt about the next step.

Talking about change or transformation is easy, making the pivot is harder. Often people find ways to talk themselves out of action instead of into action. If you’re coaching yourself you still have to pay the price of commitment.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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3 Tips for Translating Vision Into Action

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Converting vision into action is often a workplace trouble spot. People can’t always see or clearly understand how they will accomplish their goals or do their part for bringing the vision of the organization to fruition.

Goals-Mission-3131352

While it might sound absurd on the surface, think about the last time you said or heard, “I don’t even know where to get started.” Sometimes it is difficult to get started when the task in front of you looks too big or too lofty to complete.

People might look at their desk, open a closet door or peak into their favorite storage space and think that cleaning it up or organizing the mess is just too difficult. Procrastination is at least one of the trouble spots for getting more organized or translating vision into action, but there are plenty of others.

What about you, can you translate vision into action?

Workplace Vision to Action

When your boss, the CEO, or even the board of directions sets performance goals sometimes the hardest part is getting started. Sometimes when you consider the forecasts they seem to be based on lofty aspirations, stretch goals, or to be coming from the place where unicorns live. If you don’t know where to begin, you’re not alone. Here are a few tips that might help:

  1. Break goals into smaller pieces. If you are looking at an annual budget you can begin by breaking things down into quarters, months, or even weeks. Keep in mind that in many cases results are not achieved in a perfect linear fashion. There might be peaks as well as valleys, and some cyclical nature to achieving results. Sometimes smaller pieces will help you to identify your initial focus.
  2. Jump in and get started. When it feels like you don’t know where to start, and you just can’t seem to figure it all out, try to focus on just jumping in, launch into it. Do something, move something, change something, take some kind of action. Sometimes once you are in motion some of the pieces will start to come together. Quite simply, you can’t finish if you never start.
  3. Focus on wins. One of the best motivators for what to do next is to remember your successes or past accomplishments. Identify and always reflect on something that was successful no matter how small it may seem. Sometimes making the decision to get started might represent your first win. Collect all of your wins together, pile them up, look at them, think about what would have happened without these and focus on achieving more.

Translating vision into action typically doesn’t require you to find the unicorn. It does sometimes require focus, persistence, and tenacity. It might be easy to claim that the goal is too big, has never been achieved before, or cannot be accomplished with current resources but those all sound like excuses to me. If you’re really going to make something happen, you’re going to have to recognize that excuses are useless.

– DEG

See also: Do You Actualize the Vision?

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author. Some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Do You Actualize the Vision?

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More than once I’ve looked at my desk and said to myself, I don’t know where to start.

Have a look

Actually, starting isn’t typically a problem for me, but starting to clear my desk of books, tablets, mail, battery chargers, pens, vitamins, business cards, paperweights, and post-it notes sometimes feels like a chronic problem. It seems many people may have a desk drawer, a book case, or a closet that is a collection place for everything you think you might one day need. Depending on where you live and the size of your home, you may have an attic, basement, or garage that is overloaded with stuff and you often think of cleaning it up, but you just don’t know where to start.

Some people are very well organized and others not so much. If you’ve ever had that feeling of not knowing where to start, then you may feel like employees sometimes do when tasked with a big project, a goal, or a deadline.

Actualizing the Vision

Often in leadership development workshops I spend a few minutes to discuss with participants the idea of actualizing the vision. The hardest part sometimes is getting started, and good starts can be critically important for great finishes. When it comes to actualizing the vision workplace leaders have several important factors to keep in mind:

  • What is the goal or objective? If there is not a well-defined goal or objective there is nothing to reach for, and honestly, most people will just settle for the way things are if they don’t have a well-defined goal.
  • How can this be broken down into smaller pieces? Small pieces are of key importance when actualizing the vision. Smaller pieces not only provide an opportunity to pause for reflection of accomplishment, but emotionally they give people something to build on.
  • How will we measure success? Measurement should be determined prior to the work beginning, but sometimes people like to just jump in, do a few things, and then call it good enough. Decide how success will be measured and evaluated early on, preferably before the work begins.

Perhaps the easiest to implement and also the most fundamental point about actualizing the vision is to be sure to build on each successive step along the way. When people see progress and feel a sense of accomplishment they will often develop more energy and commitment to seeing the project through to completion. The hardest part might be getting started because often the vision feels like a daunting task. So big or so challenging, it is hard to see the finish line. Helping yourself or your team actualize the vision each step of the way not only adds to your leadership skillset, it also gets a lot accomplished.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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