Tag Archives: turnover

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workplace accountability

Workplace Accountability Starts With Purpose

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Frustrated, many employees feel that there is a lack of accountability. Have you sized up your workplace accountability?

As an individual, team lead, manager, or the CEO, are people accountable?

In the workplace people can be accountable for many things. They can be accountable for knowledge, skills, and abilities. They can also be accountable for their time and turning in good work.

There’s still more. People should be accountable for their attitude, commitment, and interpersonal relationships.

It’s not okay to show up and do nothing.

It’s not okay to claim, “I’m a little weird.” and then refuse to engage or form appropriate relationships.

Most of all it’s not okay to blame others, waste resources, or contribute less than what is expected.

How should you hold yourself or others accountable?

Workplace Accountability

It starts with a creating a sense of purpose.

People are much more accountable when they are connected with why their work matters.

For managers and other workplace leaders, showing them that you don’t care about them is the fastest way to have them not care about you.

Often, unconscious, thoughtless, or misinterpreted actions will undermine purpose and accountability.

Leaders who can transfer the feeling of ownership, connection, and purpose to every job seem to have an easier path to accountability.

It is easier said, than done though.

Accountability Pathways

Connecting people with purpose requires time, effort, and trust. It will not work for the person who doesn’t care about building lasting relationships.

You can’t treat people like machines. If you do, they may complete the task, but the organization will suffer from the high cost of employee turnover, low morale, and bad attitudes.

Accountability might be measured on a spreadsheet, but those results are connected to the human factor.

Connect everyone with purpose. Give them ownership in the work.

Holding people accountable can be a tough job. Creating a culture that inspires accountability lessens that effort.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Training cost

Training Cost And Other Expenses

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Have you evaluated the training cost? Have you evaluated the cost of not training? What about the time commitment, is that stopping you?

There are plenty of excuses why organizations shy away from training. Some popular excuses relate to budget, time commitments, and occasionally someone will mention a lack of need.

Measure Costs

What are the true costs associated with a lost customer? What are the costs of poor decisions made by supervisors, managers, and other workplace leaders? Employee turnover, what does that cost?

I’ve been told, “When we have a choice to ship the product or sit in training. We’re always going to ship the product.”

It is a statement that is hard to work with, yet it is a mindset that is associated with higher costs of doing business.

Shipping the product today matters. Conceptually it matters more than training. I should say, “More than training today.” Shipping the product without training is a short run game. It works while it works, until it doesn’t.

Training Cost

Most organizations deepest interest is to grow. Increase revenue, share the mission objective, touch more people, change lives, impress investors, and build, grow, build, grow.

In most businesses or even the non-profit, the long game matters more. A three-person company can ship the product efficiently, a three-hundred-person company may be different.

The infrastructure costs could be a few million, or rent or lease, is multiple tens of thousands per month. Salary and benefits, they are likely the largest item on the income statement.

Marketing and advertising, they are often paid months in advance of the collection of the accounts receivable from a possible sale.

Will you do all of that without training? That is just on the surface, dig deeper and you’ll discover more. What will shape your culture?

Every dollar invested in training accounts for many more dollars you’ll save somewhere else.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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worker engagement

Improving Worker Engagement or Calculating Turnover

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Putting the widget in the box may be a job. Today, mostly, this job is automated or is planned for automation soon. Is your organization improving worker engagement?

Things have unfolded rapidly in the past couple of decades.

Unemployment rates are currently trending low. Employers claim difficulty in finding employees and great employees claim finding great employers to be nearly impossible.

Putting widgets in the box doesn’t hold a very promising future. Retail commerce has made this a point. Self-checkouts, Amazon Go, and even McDonald’s restaurant franchises are changing how customers engage.

Automate the Future

Automation may reduce or even eliminate job positions as we once knew them.

The career minded person knows that putting widgets in the box is trending down.

Organizations may view it differently. Many traditional small privately-owned businesses insist on the old-fashioned way. They want to have easily replaceable and replicable workers.

Just put the widget in the box. Do it all day. Go home.

Certainly, we still have legitimate job opportunities that require this, and it isn’t all bad. However, the emerging (and existing) workforce sees this as a dead-end job.

Worker Engagement

It is true that organizational leadership can calculate big profits by dumbing down the work, hiring the least expensive workforce, and asking why turnover and hiring is problematic.

One obstacle with this model is, it doesn’t account for progress.

The model doesn’t take into consideration the cultural attributes of people. Most of all the model expects loyalty from those whose future in that job is as bright as a smoldering candle wick.

Here is an idea. Invite someone to join the team who is responsible to put the widget in the box. Then encourage them to find a way to improve, bring more value, or eliminate (automate) this job.

One job is a box packer, the other, an engineer.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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3 Tips for Minimizing Millennial and Gen Z Turnover

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Probably at least 1 out of every 5 clients that I speak with mention to me that one of their biggest problems is retaining the millennial or generation Z workforce. Employee turnover is costly. What if you could begin to implement low-cost actions that will start making a difference today, would you do it?

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While there are perhaps many issues connected with employee turnover at large, when we examine the newest generations in the workforce sometimes things are not always as they appear. Of course we’ve often heard of the need for immediate gratification with the most recent generations and how that might connect to salary or earning potential, and that the newest generations have very little patience when it comes to their career. We’ve also heard that these generations have a great interest in how much time off they receive and the importance of organizational social responsibility in consideration for the climate, environment, or social systems such as welfare and retirement security. All of these things are likely important to most, but sometimes there are more basics needs that can be addressed which don’t directly involve money, paid time off, or costly resources to implement. 

Through many presentations, informal interviews, and even social media interactions, I continue to learn a great deal about these workforce generations and here are a few low-cost, high-return strategic suggestions that can make a difference in your organization:

  1. Connect individuals to the purpose of their work. Most employees regardless of their age are much more motivated when they understand the connection their individual job role has with the organizations mission. Employees who are connected with their job role and see the relevance to organizational success are much more likely to be engaged in their work and feel an on-going sense of responsibility to stay the course.
  2. Establish role models or mentors of the same generation. So often I speak with organizations that mention they have paired the newest employees with the organizations best representatives as mentors. The idea is that the knowledge, skills, and abilities of the exemplary performer will transition to those newest in the organization. While this is not a bad idea, the missing element is that the power for retaining millennial and gen Z employees comes from mentors who are in their same generation. So not only must the organization establish these leaders, they must also connect them by generation.
  3. Where possible connect job roles for a work / life blend. Millennials and generation Z employees often view their approach to work much differently as compared to a traditional or baby boomer. This doesn’t make one group wrong and the other right, but it does mean that there are differences. In simple terms the millennials and generation Z employees often prefer more of a blending of work with life which is part of why a connection to purpose is so important. This is not the same as work / life balance; blending implies integrating work with life. What is sometimes challenging in this area is that required job skills or work to be performed is very on-the-job specific and as a result it is more challenging for work / life blending.

Many of the stereotypes often associated with millennial and generation Z are simply not accurate, and the mindset of some is certainly not representative of all. Organizations must look outside of factors such as pay and promotion, sure they are important, but likely not the most important. Does your organization have a specific strategy to address millennial or generation Z employee turnover? Is it working? 

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Leadership, Turnover, and Millennials

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Someone recently suggested to me that training the more recent workforce generations in leadership skills would solve the cross-generational communication challenge. While you would likely never find me disagreeing with workforce training, it has to be the right training, at the right time, and in the right quantity. Of course, it also has to be high quality.

Visionary employee thinking of development

Unfortunately, as quickly as someone suggests leadership training, someone else can make argument against it. It’s common to hear that leadership training may set unrealistic expectations for job promotions or role changes, and should those expectations not be met, it increases employee turnover. That can happen, but it shouldn’t.

Leadership training is not about here is the button, and this is how you push it. Leadership is completely different, because leadership only develops when someone decides it is important to start leading. It isn’t about millennials any more than it is about boomers. In reality, it is more about choice, it should be about a choice for the organization, and it is always about a choice for the individual.

Leadership training shouldn’t be about people leaving, but it might be about why people are staying.  

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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