Tag Archives: navigation

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better boss

Finding a Better Boss Depends On Your Navigation

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Could you benefit from a better boss? Better than what?

Many career minded individuals feel frustrated with their boss. It may be because the boss supplies what feels like meaningless work. Perhaps he or she is too commanding, or is too close-minded. There may be more than a dozen other reasons.

The reality is that you always have some opportunity to shape your own future. That includes your interactions with your boss.

Opportunities Not Dead Ends

People sometimes suggest to me, “It must be nice to be your own boss.”

I’m typically quick to reply that at any given time I may have ten, twenty, or even fifty bosses. My clients are my boss.

Certainly, I have some ability to say whether I want that relationship or not.

It isn’t much different from traditional workplace roles. In a general sense, you work where you work by choice.

You’ll have things you have to do that perhaps you don’t enjoy. There are rules to follow that may not be your rules. There are organizational politics to navigate. And, work that may not always feel rewarding, efficient, or effective.

As for my job, it still has similarities to most jobs. You can make appropriate effort, or feel like a victim.

You can help by playing the role that needs played. That may be doing something creative, something necessary, or something monotonous.

Perhaps, you will also find opportunities to help by making suggestions. Have you ever considered doing it this way?

Not everything will be thought of as useful. Not everything will be welcomed with open arms.

Better Boss Navigation

There are at least three paths for your navigation.

  1. The boss (or client) welcomes your advice and that makes things different or better.
  2. You remain appropriately persistent. Eventually your contributions achieve a breakthrough and seem to matter. See number one.
  3. You pack up your toys and move to a different sandbox.

A fourth, alternative path, is to accept everything as is. Remember though, that is your choice.

Sometimes the best way to help yourself is to help your boss. Whether it is one boss or many, you have the choice for navigation.

There are trade-offs everywhere.

Choose the navigation that fits you best. Blaming the boss isn’t a solution.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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understanding navigation

Understanding Navigation and Where You’ll End Up

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Understanding navigation may be more difficult than many workplace professionals quickly recognize. Yes, it is often about what we do and how we react and that defines how we navigate.

Just last week someone annoyed you in a meeting. Someone else didn’t complete a task, delayed the project, or simply decided not to show up.

This week there are schedule pressures. An update meeting with the boss and a report to complete.

There are countless opportunities to get annoyed in our workplace. Opportunities to see stress, feel stressed, and worry. Was anything different last month, last year, or at your old job?

Navigating The Same Stuff

Some things have probably changed but yet in reality you worried last year about stuff that just doesn’t matter this year.

You worried about sales being off, the budget not being balanced, or that a co-worker was trying to undermine your project.

You worried about what you said in the meeting, how you said it, and when the boss may have hinted (although you aren’t sure) that you aren’t measuring up.

None of those things matter this year. Although now you have an entire new set of somewhat similar challenges.

Are you navigating differently?

Understanding Navigation

Sure you may have grown. You attended the seminar, read a book, and listened to a few podcasts. You’ve chatted with colleagues, asked for feedback, and with some apprehension, listened to the critics.

Being stressed and worried doesn’t accomplish much. Feeling annoyed and getting irritated does not really serve a useful propose.

What happened last week or last month may have some impact but largely our career and the work that we do is about what is accomplished across decades of commitment and navigation.

Last week you weren’t a novice, an amateur, and now you’re an expert. It took you time, lessons learned, and navigation.

Don’t overestimate the impact of a single experience and don’t underestimate the value of the culmination of a decade.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace currents

Workplace Currents and Getting To The Other Side

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Do you find navigating workplace currents a challenge? Are you fighting upstream, going with the flow, or simply trying to get to the other side?

What strategy for navigating workplace currents would you recommend?

Survivalists Message

Survivalists claim that the best way to cross a stream in waist deep water is to face directly across the stream. They suggest you shouldn’t face upstream, or downstream, but you should stay focused on an exit point on the other side.

The logic seems to be that facing upstream could cause you to slip, lose your balance, and topple backwards, possibly drowning. Facing downstream may get you across but not where you need to be as you would slowly be drifting away from your exit.

Is this similar to navigating workplace currents?

Workplace Currents

Certainly, confidence and approaching obstacles head on has its value. Yet, going with the flow feels like the easier route.

Perhaps it depends on the goal. For many, career growth is very important, yet it may feel like a catastrophic failure will seal your fate.

Sometimes surviving the workplace current is the most important aspect. You still want to thrive, but first you have to get through the current.

Much of what happens next depends on how you choose to navigate. Our belief systems and what we tell ourselves will have a significant impact on the outcomes.

So will the idea of keeping your eye on the prize.

Sometimes the hardest part is not the obstacle itself, it is the concentration and focus required to stick with your goal.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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