Tag Archives: harmony

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team harmony

Team Harmony and the Common Goal

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In today’s workplace, it is tempting to be self-absorbed. Society supports groups within groups who wield an opinionated lens that shifts perspectives across generations like a kaleidoscope changes the reflection of light. Is team harmony still possible?

Being the critic attracts the bystanders, the onlookers, those who risk little but critique a lot. In the unhealthy team, instead of finding a reason to explore and embrace, it is more popular to be confrontational and oppose. The old idiom connected with “everyone has an opinion” is alive and well.

Unsuccessful Teams

Often driven by envy, jealously, or victimhood the goal is to move up, move around, or stampede. Domination is the strategy and what it costs in morale is of little concern to those leading the oppositional crusade.

This describes the unsuccessful team. The team plagued with a viral cancerous disease that drains the spirit of the mission faster than a bottle of Drano dumped in the kitchen sink. People still show up, but they show up for a paycheck not an organizational goal.

It is true that the organization is sometimes unorganized but work still happens. This work lacks meaning, it lacks a personality, and its only style is that of despair.

By definition team harmony shouldn’t be making a sound that we shutter to hear.

Team Harmony

What if there was a different crusade? What if the sound was more pleasant?

Imagine when someone talks, everyone else listens. They don’t listen to respond but they listen to understand. They don’t listen for what’s in it for them for but they listen for what they can put into it.

Imagine that people don’t show up with the intent to be oppositional and they don’t show up with the goal of divide and conquer. They don’t show up with a movement, a theme, or with a position that says their group is different and for that reason, different treatment is their goal.

Common Goals

Does team harmony still exist? It should and it can.

It is about how you build the empire, not tear it down.

What is the common goal?

Pursuit of anything else isn’t about the team, it is a distraction about the individual.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Building trust

Building Trust, Faux Harmony, and Fitting In

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Working with people you trust makes the most sense. Building trust can be a delicate pursuit. Is it really trust you are after, or are you looking for faux harmony?

Nearly everyone in the workplace will agree that they want trust. They want their co-workers to trust their ideas, contributions, and promises. Yet nearly everyone has a story of deceit, promises and contributions that weren’t kept, and how a defensive position feels safer.

Feels Safe

The concept then takes on a different goal, the goal of safety.

Challenging the status quo is not an option because you’ll end up on the list of people who are struck from advancement.

So you don’t make any waves. You navigate the system carefully and do everything that you can to fit in, quietly.

When your pursuit becomes the pursuit of safety that really means you’re goal is to fit in. Fitting in is important. Often the person with the best fit is the person who gets hired. Fitting in is a good strategy in certain situations, but it also a challenging strategy when you seek advancement.

Fitting In

The quickest way to be overlooked is to fit in, perfectly. The quickest way to start building trust is to keep your commitments, do good work, and do it consistently.

A culture of workplace trust means that people know what to expect and when. Conditioning everything you do based on fitting in doesn’t mean you’ll be trusted. It means you’ll be another face in the crowd.

A crowd that is always silent and stands for nothing is an untrusted crowd. Trust isn’t always about fitting in. In fact, those who are truly trusted probably never fit perfectly.

Building Trust

For some, the situation creates who they are, and for others they create the situation. Being trusted is more important than faux harmony. Building trust is not the same as working to fit in.

No one said it would be easy.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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work together appreciative strategies

3 Ways to Get the Team to Work Together

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Are you working with a team on a project? Are you trying to start or launch something new, make a change, or simply make forward progress? How do you get the team to work together?

People have been asking the same question for years, “Why can’t we all just get along?” Answers to this question can be challenging. Finding mutual agreement in several key areas might help.

Discovering Harmony

Here are a few things that might help your team find harmony.

  1. Understand the goal. Sometimes co-workers lose sight of the fact that you are all in it together. It shouldn’t be this person against that person or this clique over that clique. Teams that can agree on the goal are a step ahead of the rest. You might have different ideas on how to there, but the goal is understood.
  2. Agree on measurement. Can you agree on how you will measure success? What are the timelines and milestones? If you can agree on the goal, you should be able to form some consensus on the measurement. What will you measure and how?
  3. Accept the facts. A willingness to search for and understand the facts might be critical. Evidence is often hard to disregard. At the same time, working too hard to prove the point isn’t necessarily the best approach. Consider facts to be tools. Use them as appropriate to help create effective measurement.

Teams that are on the same journey are the most effective. Those who can’t agree on the goal, measurement, or facts have additional challenges.

Work Together

We might need to accept that there is more than one way to get to the end result. Sometimes the process needs to be fluid, but the goal remains unchanged.

What would you do if you were ship wrecked? Most would prefer to cooperate and never crash in the first place.

Work together, it seems to make the most sense.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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