Tag Archives: choice

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analyzed enough

Wait, We Haven’t Analyzed Enough

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One person always wants to decide fast, quick, and hurried. Another wants more time, more data, and additional input. Have you analyzed enough?

It seems that there is always more data. We can ask a few more people, research some old work, and attempt to benchmark the industry. Does it really matter?

One trouble spot is that more data isn’t really what people seek. They are seeking more certainty, less risk, and the fear of a bad decision.

Wait for What?

Procrastination on a decision can still be a decision. “I’m making the choice to not decide, yet.”

A delay sometimes feels safer. The feeling is that you can’t be criticized because you didn’t decide, only if you do decide and you’re wrong.

You weigh the risk of the decision on the cost of being wrong instead of on the cost of time or the cost of being stuck.

It is the fallacy of critical thinking. No choice is a safe choice.

Analyzed Enough

The reality is that time is often not on our side. Patience is important, but time always keeps moving.

A decision or choice not made may allow the window to close, or worse, the competition jumps through leaving you behind.

You can spend a lot of time reviewing the past. Reliving the mistakes from before and feeling stuck about the action you should take next.

Experience suggests more watching, listening, and learning, yet time can’t wait.

Change needs motion. Motion means you are not stuck.

If there is a change you need to make, today may be a great day to start.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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risky decision

When Speaking Up is a Risky Decision

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We all play a role in the workplace. Even the person who is never asked plays a role. Everyone has an opportunity to contribute, the question is, “How will they?” Have you ever felt that speaking up is a risky decision?

We sometimes evaluate our circumstances in strange ways. Our contributions as an employee may find us offering opinions or retreating to silence out of fear. What do you do?

Fear as a Driver

Much of what happens in our workplace cultures is conditioned by fear. Sometimes intentionally, sometimes not, but it still happens.

What happened the last time someone was wrong? Did their contribution get labeled as a failure? Did they get uninvited from the team meeting? Are their chances of a future promotion now limited? Were they fired?

Perhaps none of those things happened but that is the message that is often floating around in our head. “I should say something but it is too risky.”

What is your measurement of risk?

Do you withdraw from contributing out of fear? Do you watch your team or organization make costly wrong turns which could have been avoided if you offered your perspective? What is riskier?

Risky Decision

No one wants to make a bad choice or a wrong decision. Sometimes our decisions turn out the wrong way because we lack information.

No one told me the caesar salad had anchovies. 

I didn’t realize how many calories were in the chocolate fudge brownie. 

They person I bought the car from never mentioned the transmission was acting up. 

What carries the most risk? The consequences of politely and appropriately contributing to the conversation or watching the disaster that may unfold if you don’t speak up?

Be careful with your risky decision.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace fit

Workplace Fit Has More Than One Meaning

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Ask someone why they didn’t get the job and they may reply, “I guess I wasn’t the right fit.” When someone chooses a GM vehicle over the Ford, it may be about fit. Nike over Reebok, it may be about fit.

All these examples of fit are different, yet similar. Most importantly, they are relevant.

About Fit

Fit for the vehicle brand of choice is probably not about dimensions. The same for a running shoe, we can probably always find the best fitting size.

Brand choice is a different kind of fit.

Many organizations strive to hire for fit. What fit are they trying to fulfill? Does fit come down to the idea of like or acceptance?

Are you employed by an organization that embraces diversity? How does fit work there?

Fit should never be confused with like. When we decide we don’t like something or someone, does that make it the wrong fit?

Who is selected for the board of directors? What about the steering committee or the committee that organizes the summer picnic? Is it based on who fits the best or perhaps who is more liked?

Whenever we base decisions on like we are making a sacrifice. We give up what someone else has to offer. We give up on that brand, the promise, or the possibility of a different experience.

Workplace Fit

Hiring for fit should be considered logically against need. It should be as objective as possible and leaving the least amount of room for subjective analysis.

If the entire board or committee thinks exactly the same then the decisions and outcomes will follow accordingly. In some cases, this could be the path for the beginning of the end. No different points of view and we’re stuck, stalled, or stopped.

Be aware of how you are deciding about fit.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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decision wait

Can Your Decision Wait? Should It?

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Procrastination about deciding is common. Especially for those big decisions, the high-risk kind. Can your decision wait? A better question may be, “Should it wait?”

The timeliness of decisions always feels problematic. Going too soon may involve some remorse later. Waiting too long, well, it may be too late.

The waitstaff may I ask, “Are you ready to order or do you need a few more minutes?”

That new car purchase, the salesperson may suggest, “Take your time. We’ve only had one other person looking at this vehicle.”

Sometimes it is the anticipation of what we may end up with or the opportunity that we might miss.

Some people will throw it out to fate, “If it is meant to be, it will be.”

Spring into Action

Emotionally we can be influenced to spring into action. It is what marketing does, the savvy salesperson, or our toe tapping friend with little patience.

Most decisions we make feel like the right decision at the time. We analyze and assess the playing field, the market, and the forecast. At the exact moment we make the decision it is the right decision.

As what happens next unfolds our decision may hold up to be good, or be bad, but at the time we made it, it was good.

Decision Wait

We can procrastinate about decisions for long periods of time. So much so that we completely miss opportunities.

If you were in business in the late 1980’s and waited long enough about the decision to purchase a fax machine, today, you’re in luck. You’ve never had to purchase a fax machine.

Be careful of the marketing that gives you a shove. Watch out for friends who suggest, “No risk, no reward.”

When the decision is yours, make a smart choice, do it with intention. Things always change. You say when.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Good difference

Good Difference, Are You Making One?

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Monday through Friday is a popular schedule for many workers, others are six or even seven days nearly every week. People and businesses are often trying to make a difference. The question may be, is it a good difference?

When you ask around, most people will probably quickly agree that the World around us is changing. Are you changing, is your organization changing, or should changes be happening?

Status Quo

Choice conditions whether we change. Change is a decision. It is easy to fall in love with the status quo. In the status quo the risk feels much less. People believe, “I know this works and I’m sticking with it.”

Many people approach their Monday through Friday doing what works. Doing it over and over again, week after week, as the World changes. Change doesn’t always need to happen, but is it happening enough? Enough for you, your career, or your business?

We often pick the low hanging fruit. That is the easy fruit, reachable, achievable, and enjoyable. Life is easy, just pick what you can and move on to the next. It feels comfortable to fall in love with easy.

If nothing ever changes, easy may continue to work for a long time, or theoretically forever. In a World that is stuck or standing still there isn’t much need for change.

Good Difference

Is there a requirement for something different? Is there a requirement for change? When you recognize that the World isn’t standing still you may also realize you need to make a difference. A good difference, not a bad choice.

Choice is scary because it comes without a warranty or guarantee. What you do next may not work. It may have bugs, kinks, and turn off the people you’ve worked hard to please.

Getting a ladder to pick the fruit others are skipping, the fruit we’ve never reached for, has an unknown level of success. There is choice and risk involved. Will it be a good difference?

If nothing is changing, then I guess it makes sense to just keep doing the same thing. No need for different.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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consensus decisions

Consensus Decisions and the Power of the Group

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Working alone, is the sometimes dream of the team member. Frustrated with roadblocks, different opinions, and even unhealthy conflict may make people believe that stand-alone is better. However, when you want a good decision, consensus decisions may be the best option available.

Decisions and Problems

I really enjoy working with groups on learning how to think more critically, how to solve problems, and most of all, make better decisions. Many people enter the seminar thinking that there may not be much to learn and that it will be another hold hands and sing Kumbaya session. It is not.

Our environment often conditions us. Society is an environment that everyone reading this must navigate. Our values and beliefs will shape the ebb and flow of how we process information. This is especially evident when we consider generational differences.

Many argue that our technology driven society is leading to less interaction, more solitude, and social distress. There may or may not be something to that but others may argue it is bringing us closer, just in a different way.

You may also like: Driving Decisions Through Culture In Your Organization

When it comes to making decisions, research says that more people are better than one. Consensus decisions by far exceed the probability of a good decision when compared with those made stand alone.

Through the results of hundreds of seminars that I’ve personally delivered on the subject, I know that consensus decisions work, and work well.

Consensus Decisions

It may be important to understand exactly what a consensus decision is. First, it is not a majority vote. Properly executed consensus decisions welcome and consider the thoughts of everyone in the group. It is not about minority power persuading others. It is about everyone agreeing with a chosen path.

As you may guess, true decision by consensus is often hard to attain. It may require extra time, patience, and a willingness to consider ideas different from your own. However, the quality of the decision makes it very worthwhile.

Technically, the best method to process a decision by consensus is through a round-robin approach. This approach suggests that each group member has an opportunity to express his or her thoughts, experiences, and probable outcomes of a choice.

As the group processes each member listens to understand and consider each explanation and probable outcomes of the choice. In the end, in true decision by consensus, all group members agree with the decision or choice.

In a society that seems to be changing it forms of connection, one thing may still be true. When it comes to brainpower, the power of many is still better than the power of one.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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choose motivation

Do You Choose Motivation or Does It Just Happen?

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Some will tell you that people can’t be motivated. That they either are, or are not, intrinsically motivated. If you have a choice, will you choose motivation?

Many people hate Monday, they perk up on Wednesday, and the rest of the week they are looking forward to Friday. There is even a popular restaurant chain to embrace the concept.

Expectations

Do you get what you expect? Are you motivated by your surroundings? What about the workplace atmosphere or climate, does that have anything to do with it?

Should we go another step, what about marketing and advertising, do they impact motivation?

The answer to all of these questions is easy, yes. We are impacted by our surroundings, our expectations, and what we may discover is the norm for our current situation. No, it isn’t always everybody, but it is likely the majority.

What Plays a Role

Is the traditional college student more motivated than the non-traditional student?

Are you more motivated during your first week of your job as compared to week fifty?

Do more people find success at a public fitness center as compared to their home gym workout routine?

Certainly, there are exceptions to all of these scenarios, but you likely see the point. Surroundings, atmosphere, and expectations all play a role.

About Choice

Imagine if on Friday you had to pry yourself away from your workplace, and on Monday you couldn’t wait to get started again? Imagine if you took that energy seriously, applied it and shared it. Would things change?

We can probably all think of times when we’ve been more motivated and times when we’ve been less motivated.

Choose Motivation

What you get and what you deliver has much to do with your expectations. When you choose motivation you not only make a difference for yourself, you make a difference for others.

Motivation gives you something to be generous with, your attitude.

– DEG

Originally posted on March 7, 2018, last updated on May 29, 2019.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Paycheck only employees

Paycheck Only Employees and Other Cultural Blunders

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Clients often tell me, “We have paycheck only employees.” Their statement is often a cry for help. Does the available workforce, societal trends, or the culture of the organization create this situation, perhaps it is all three, and many other factors.

Facts and Myths

Certainly, there are challenges with the workforce demographics in many areas. This is not a myth it is a fact. Societal trends, certainly, yes, they also condition much of the attitude and temperament about employment.

What about the organization, is it possible that the organizational culture also affects or has responsibility for the creation of this so-called paycheck only employee?

Find What You Seek

Sometimes we find exactly what we seek. Perhaps a parent cautioned you back in the day, “Don’t go looking for trouble.” Did you listen? Most or at least many probably did. They tried hard to steer clear of what appeared to be potential trouble.

What does your organization seek? Does the help wanted ad focus on money or the job?

This doesn’t mean the amount of verbiage committed to describing the organization or the job; it means what is the attraction point and the culture? What are you advertising? Are you looking for paycheck only employees?

Driven By Emotion

People assess the environment by what they feel. Certainly, many authoritarian environments have executives urging people to remove the emotion, but emotion still guides many of the choices.

The unemotional executive probably doesn’t drive a nice car or live in a nice place, with nice things. Nice things are an emotional choice. Perhaps fulfilling some practical needs, but often also expensive. They are beyond need, they are about a feeling and are driven by emotion.

People are driven (or not) by emotion. What are the cultural indicators in your organization? When your organization offers a job, what is the selling point? Is it money? Is it about a career, a stepping stone, or just fulfilling a need?

The employee who only wants money and the organization that only offers to fulfill that need are sometimes a perfect match. The people are there for a paycheck. Caring on the other hand, that is emotional, it is also optional. You’ll expect higher turnover, you’ll get it.

Paycheck Only Employees

When the environment feels like the organization doesn’t truly care about the employee, the employee really doesn’t really care about the organization.

Advertise what you seek, be what you advertise. Deliver on the promise.

You’ll find what you are looking for, everything else is only about the paycheck.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Choose choice

Do You Choose Choice Or Not Have One?

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Have you ever felt like you didn’t have a choice? Often the truth is that you have to choose choice.

Habits control much of what happens throughout our day.

When we are under stress or pressure, we often will default to what feels natural, safe, or puts up a wall.

No Choice

People often suggest that they did it because they had no choice.

Sometimes it feels as though life happens to us. Yes things break. Yes, circumstances or situations may be beyond our control. Sometimes life doesn’t cooperate. However, much of what happens next depends on choice.

It feels safer to place the blame on circumstances, situations, or other people.

I’m not applying for that job because I don’t have the degree.

That networking event isn’t for me. I won’t know anyone there.

I don’t know how to do that, but no one recognizes my true skills.

We often imagine we are blocked at every twist, every turn. Our imagination tells us that there are obstacles, hurdles, or gaps that we can’t possibly navigate or bridge. Those are often the easy choices, not the same as no choice.

Possibilities often exist except we don’t see them. We choose not to see them because we are convinced that they are too difficult or too risky. In other cases, we may become trained that a failure means it is over, we won’t go there again.

It is the boy turned down for the dance, the runaway bride or groom, or the interview without a job offer.

The easier choice, the safe one, is to put up a wall, suggest you know the outcome, or simply claim that there was no choice.

Choose Choice

Habits often link us to safety and comfort. Following a habit is not the same as not having a choice.

Will you choose choice? Do you have a choice?

Following the easy choice doesn’t mean that there are no other options.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Leadership By Choice, Making The Decision To Lead

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Leadership by choice, have you made the decision?

You’ll always find that there is much to be said about leadership. There are methods, models and best practices, but people seldom pause long enough to recognize that leadership only happens when someone decides.

leadership by choice appreciative strategies

Recently I wrote about why leadership matters and contained in that article were 25 questions each touching a factor relevant for leadership success. The truth is it could have been 50 questions, or more. One question that is seldom addressed is, “Have you made the choice to lead?”

Anytime we seek change, whether it is a personal, professional, or some combination of the two, it will only happen when we decide. Sometimes people believe that they want to change, but they aren’t hungry enough to see it through.

Making the decision to lead isn’t always the same as making the commitment. First you have to make the conscious choice, and then you have to be hungry enough to continue the pursuit.

Leadership by Choice

When you believe you’re ready to make the choice and commitment you might want to ask yourself a few important questions.

  1. Why do you want to lead? Can you answer this question? If not, you can make the choice, but the commitment might be lacking. Understanding why you want to lead will guide the answers to the questions you’ll ask when you think it might be time to quit.
  2. What is the purpose? What are you leading and why is it important? Wilderness survival is based on need, but many business cases for creating purpose aren’t that simple. People will work hard for a purpose that they believe in, you’ll need purpose.
  3. Why should people follow? Clarity in purpose and direction will help inspire a following, but also critical will be the credibility, dependability, and reliability of believing the pursuit is worthwhile and achievable. Followers believe.

Success in leadership is leadership by choice. Someone making the decision for you will most likely not create the desire for success that is necessary to endure the journey.

Have you decided? Is it your time to lead?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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