Tag Archives: automation

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good jobs

Good Jobs Are Not For Robots. Not Yet.

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Are human jobs at your organization in jeopardy? What are the good jobs?

Ask a group of people if they believe things in the World around us are rapidly changing, and many will say, “Yes.”

Automating Job Tasks

In nearly all business sectors humans are being replaced by machines. You can go to a movie theater, a retail store, or to a bank and you’ll find jobs being replaced by machines.

It is nothing really new. Have you ever used a car wash or an ATM?

Vending machines have origins back to the late 1800’s. Since at least the 1940’s you have been able to drop some money in a Coke machine and get a Coke. Some sales transactions haven’t required a human to do each and every task for more than a century.

In manufacturing environments efficiency, speed, and accuracy are paramount. Human jobs are being replaced, yet again, this is nothing new.

Some suggest the replacement is because of a lack of skilled labor. Yet, having the skill to add or subtract, file a piece of paper alphabetically, or move the box to the freight truck is easily automated.

Also automated are job skills connected to welding, gluing, and machining. Are those labor skills?

Yes, our World is changing. What are the best jobs?

Good Jobs

Job security really exists most in the platform of projects and not tasks.

Granted, you may be able to proclaim that a project is made up of many tasks but the task will likely be the first victim of automation.

Still today projects largely require human intervention. The human must think, act, and decide about how things will proceed. A task itself may be completed by a machine, but often only after human intervention has made the choice to put the machine into action.

When we query the data, that’s an automated task. Using the Keurig to make a coffee, is some form of an automated task. That remote car starter on your key chain, yes, an automated task.

Good jobs are for the project manager, not the task doer. Slowly bit by bit, tasks are being replaced by machines. It is nothing new. Only it is happening faster and faster as great minds strive to do more in less time or with less effort and more accuracy.

Good jobs are still out there. Human to human transactions still have value over human to machine in many ways. Only it is about navigating projects and not about doing tasks.

At least for now.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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worker engagement

Improving Worker Engagement or Calculating Turnover

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Putting the widget in the box may be a job. Today, mostly, this job is automated or is planned for automation soon. Is your organization improving worker engagement?

Things have unfolded rapidly in the past couple of decades.

Unemployment rates are currently trending low. Employers claim difficulty in finding employees and great employees claim finding great employers to be nearly impossible.

Putting widgets in the box doesn’t hold a very promising future. Retail commerce has made this a point. Self-checkouts, Amazon Go, and even McDonald’s restaurant franchises are changing how customers engage.

Automate the Future

Automation may reduce or even eliminate job positions as we once knew them.

The career minded person knows that putting widgets in the box is trending down.

Organizations may view it differently. Many traditional small privately-owned businesses insist on the old-fashioned way. They want to have easily replaceable and replicable workers.

Just put the widget in the box. Do it all day. Go home.

Certainly, we still have legitimate job opportunities that require this, and it isn’t all bad. However, the emerging (and existing) workforce sees this as a dead-end job.

Worker Engagement

It is true that organizational leadership can calculate big profits by dumbing down the work, hiring the least expensive workforce, and asking why turnover and hiring is problematic.

One obstacle with this model is, it doesn’t account for progress.

The model doesn’t take into consideration the cultural attributes of people. Most of all the model expects loyalty from those whose future in that job is as bright as a smoldering candle wick.

Here is an idea. Invite someone to join the team who is responsible to put the widget in the box. Then encourage them to find a way to improve, bring more value, or eliminate (automate) this job.

One job is a box packer, the other, an engineer.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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