Category Archives: belief

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workplace beliefs

Do Workplace Beliefs Outweigh Documented Results?

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What are your workplace beliefs? Do you believe you and your team are doing your best work? Do believe in the quality, customer satisfaction, and the efficiencies of your goods or services?

Have you ever believed in something so strongly that you tend to ignore the facts?

People believe in many things.

Religion

Global Warming

Bigfoot

Aliens

Moon Landing

It only takes one of these to get people engaged in a discussion, and I haven’t even mentioned conspiracy theories, government transparency, and the age of the Great Sphinx of Giza.

Most beliefs are personal, that is why they are often said to be off-limits in the workplace or in mixed social settings. Religion and politics are two of the most commonly suggested to avoid.

Imagine a belief in any one thing. Imagine the belief to be so strong that you can’t see the facts, you deny the existence of evidence, and you push forward with your belief.

What effort or extremes might you go to in order to keep your belief alive?

Workplace Beliefs

Sometimes the missing element in the workplace is belief. Dreams are shattered, expectations squandered, and the future outlook appears to be more of the same.

Forcing people into a belief is unlikely at best.

It is compelling messages, forward motion, and the perception of evidence that help shape direction. Even when the data may illustrate something contrary to the belief.

You can present the facts, show the data, and tell the story. Personal commitment will always be based on belief.

People spend a lifetime trying to prove someone or something wrong. People spend a lifetime trying to prove something as correct.

Bring the documentation but it is not nearly as powerful as what each individual chooses to believe.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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emotions guide

Emotions Guide Your Work, Good or Bad

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Do you recognize how your emotions guide everything that happens next? Emotions are tightly connected to your culture whether it is realized or not.

Leaders sometimes suggest you should remove the emotion in order to make a good decision.

Certainly, there are times when that may apply. Yet, there are other circumstances or situations where emotion is what creates forward energy.

Buy-in, persistence, and motivation may all be linked to emotions. Passion for the work and caring about the customer are also connected to emotions or feelings.

Emotions Guide

Many businesses face change. The thought always is, get buy-in for the change effort.

It is easy to quickly reject the suggestion for a new path in the meeting. It may be easy to bring up all the obstacles and roadblocks in the path of making a new direction work.

Sometimes, great ideas are quickly put to rest by eager naysayers.

At the same time, ideas that gain traction are also connected to emotions.

When it seems like a good idea excitement builds, commitment develops, and those involved are emotionally connected. When people are connected at that level, they don’t want to see the project fail and they’ll work hard to overcome any obstacle that may sabotage success.

After days, weeks, or years of commitment to a path or system, people are emotional. They have witnessed the success, poured their heart into keeping it alive, and have satisfied hundreds or multiple thousands of customers.

It would have been easy to reject the system when it was only a thought. Once it comes to life is it also connected to emotion.

Sticking to a path, an idea, or even an employee is emotional.

Good or bad.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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compelling belief

Compelling Belief Is Not Necessarily a Fact

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Have you been lured in by someone stating their compelling belief? Stated with confidence and vigor, it is often easy to believe.

People have strong opinions about political issues, yet they often can’t cite the framework of their opinions.

People have strong opinions about medical concerns. The 2020 pandemic has been the playing field for so-called experts.

Still other people have strong opinions about community activities, the size and style of your home, or even what you can do with your land.

When someone disagrees, goes in a different direction, or shrugs and walks away it is not necessarily a sign of intelligence. It may be a sign of different values or beliefs.

This is exactly why the narrative matters so much.

Compelling Belief

Doing something right now may not mean it is the wrong thing. It may just be the wrong thing at this time.

Expanding the marketing plan that has fuzzy results only makes sense when you believe.

Stating that the product doesn’t feel right is a belief. It may be factual to someone and understanding the feeling will get you closer to the facts.

Everyone believes something.

It may not be a shared belief because they haven’t heard the story behind it.

Is your story compelling?

The Real Story

If the story behind it is only based on opinions, it doesn’t make the narrative any more valuable.

Stating that you want someone to believe what you believe because it is a fact, may only be a matter of opinion.

It is only compelling when it resonates with the audience.

Uncompelled people may have different facts.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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personal goals

Personal Goals Start With What You Believe

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What are your personal goals? Get promoted, get healthier, or perhaps secure your financial position? Maybe it is all of those and a whole lot more.

Do you believe in your goals?

Belief is a funny thing. Belief will often come to life based on your surroundings. Are other people in a similar place in life getting promoted? Are people building houses, working out, or starting a garden? What is happening around you?

If everyone in your network attends church on a regular basis, you might decide to attend. If nearly no one does, you might not either. When they believe in a particular political party, you may join their movement, or you may watch from the sidelines.

When people share their values and beliefs and create a lifestyle that surrounds those principles, others may join in.

You may start to believe, or if you already believe, then your beliefs may get reinforced by others believing too.

On a high level, this probably makes sense and resonates with most people.

Do you believe in you?

Is what you are planning to do or accomplish true?

Personal Goals

If you want to take a vacation of a lifetime, build your dream home, or drive a very expensive car will you make it happen? Will you make it come true?

Not all beliefs are true.

There are people who won’t believe what you believe. They may not believe getting a promotion is possible. They may insist weight loss or health gains are just too complicated. And for financial positioning, well, it may be that they believe that is only for the elite, the rich and famous.

Many people work tirelessly for their employer and they do get a promotion. There are plenty who change their eating habits, take a walk, and get better sleep. Financial positioning may not be as much about what you make as it is about what you keep.

All of those are structured by belief.

What you tell yourself or what others tell you will condition what happens next. Belief is often about your community.

Be part of one that contributes to, not distracts you from what you want to happen next.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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career narratives

Career Narratives Shape What Happens Next

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Is it really a self-fulfilled prophecy? Are you working for a career? Is your career working for you? Consciously or not, career narratives may be shaping your future.

When I go to the meeting today, no one will listen.

This is too expensive; the customer will never go for it.

I’m not getting promoted because no one see’s my value.

If any, or all of those are in your head, you might be limiting your own career.

There are thousands of other examples of the narrative people recite to themselves and the associated outcomes.

That narrative is a prediction of the future. Often a fairly accurate prediction because somehow, people allow it to unfold exactly as it was created in their mind.

There is a good chance it is based on past experiences. Even second hand experiences. Across time, these experiences have a way of stacking. They add up.

Conclusions about career directions may be true or false. Accurate or a complete insecurity.

How it all plays out, is often exactly as you predicted.

Career Narratives

If someone suggests, “You can’t be successful doing that.” You just might believe them. Of course, another route may be to prove them wrong.

The difference then is what is in your head. It is the narrative that you have created or accepted.

Every career has a narrative. It’s built from experiences, learning, and is largely invented. That is, until you bring it to fruition.

Since it is your career, you have the responsibility for its creation.

It is a great story.

If you want it to be.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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workplace proof

Workplace Proof, Do You Believe It?

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If someone told you that sales are going to explode beyond your wildest imagination in the next quarter would you believe it? Workplace proof often requires evidence. Does it also require imagination?

Change is a constant. Sometimes it is more accelerated and sometimes it is more gradual.

Do you believe in the change when you hear about it, or do you need to see it to believe it?

Buy-in is critical for navigating a changing environment. Change is driven by forces. Internal or external those forces will drive change.

As we are about to enter late summer and fall 2020, everyone likely recognizes we are in a presidential election year. Political opinions are everywhere on social media, on television, and perhaps even in your postal system mailbox.

What do you believe? You are influenced by those around you, your friends, and your family? What are your own individual beliefs?

It may be hard to pinpoint exactly what drives your personal beliefs. However, there are little triggers and reminders of what is important to you.

They may give you all of the proof that you need.

Workplace Proof

In the workplace, it isn’t that much different for how you’ll decide what you feel about the next change. You’re influenced in multiple ways about what will happen next. Whether you like it, believe in it, or think it is total garbage.

Role models will provide some of that influence. That influence will be entwined with your level of trust and respect for those modeling new behaviors or strategic plans.

You’ll also observe what others are doing and saying. You may have tendencies towards either leading or following, and much of that may depend on your comfort level, past experiences, and of course, your values and beliefs.

For most people, change requires proof.

Is your job changing? Are economic conditions pushing you towards a change? Do you need your team to pivot to a new direction?

To be committed to what happens next you may first have to decide what you believe?

That belief starts with what you consider to be proof.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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your beliefs

Your Beliefs and My Beliefs Can Be Different

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A united workforce is a good place to start. After all, everyone is in it together. Are your beliefs different from some others? Is this OK?

What do you feel strongly about?

People believe deeply in many things:

Religion

Political views

The Universe

Parental values

Authority

Government

Urban or Rural Living

Apple or Android

Chevrolet or Ford

Tattoos or no tattoos

No matter which side you are on, you may have deep beliefs. You may believe your way is the best, it is the right way, the proper way, or even the only way.

In most of these examples it doesn’t matter for making Tasty Cakes, bottling water, or growing corn.

Sure, government, authority sources, and even something like the weather has an impact, yet largely you can have differences and still unite on something that matters to others in the group.

The strength and power of your beliefs are real. Those opposing feel just as strongly.

The passion that you have is similar to others, only perhaps, different.

Your Beliefs

You can fight about it on social media but you likely aren’t changing anyone’s mind. You can Tweet about it, make signs, and conduct protests, yet you’ll likely change very few minds.

Maybe the best thing is to focus on what you have in common.

In the workplace, it is the success of the business or organization that is a commonality.

Can you join together for that?

Is that something you can work with?

Your beliefs and my beliefs can be different.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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wasteful worrying

Wasteful Worrying, What Will You Choose?

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You want to make a change, take a chance, or understand what the future holds. Uncertainty often leads to wasteful worrying. Is that where you’re at?

Worry is about choice. A choice to contemplate over and over again. A choice to wonder or fantasize negativity about a pending outcome.

Everyone Worries

It’s easy to worry. It’s easy to remember the things that went wrong. Everything that happens when you let your guard down or fail to take some advice from someone else.

Worry drives us to do many things.

A few of them may be positive. The double check, the confirmation, or reading over the draft document one more time.

Most worry is a waste of time though. It is a waste of your energy and other precious resources.

It may bring others down. Cause a stir, even a panic.

We often worry because we feel afraid. Fear causes hesitation. Hesitation sometimes results in missed opportunities, or worse, closed doors.

Some people place worry on faith. A belief that things will work out as they should.

Others will place it on a gamble. Take a chance, or throw in the cards.

Can you do better?

Will you make a better choice for the use of your time?

Wasteful Worrying

If you have no control over the pending outcome, why worry?

If you have control over the pending outcome, can you count on your knowledge and expertise? Is there a metric, a track record, or benchmark data?

Should you be more confident?

What if you committed to worry less? What if every time you felt it coming on you made a different choice about your energy allocation?

It’s easy to worry. Nothing worthwhile comes easily.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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real world stories

Real World Stories Are What We’re Looking For

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The Three Billy Goats Gruff is a fairy tale. So is Rumpelstiltskin. When you’re trying to evoke positive change, it is best to start with real world stories.

Most change starts with a story. A story about the past, a story about hardship, adversity, or overwhelming success. The most powerful stories often contain all three.

Rocky Balboa is a story. So is The Pursuit of Happiness (2006). Many consider both to be motivational, heart touching, and potentially life changing.

Are they true? Perhaps not completely, yet they are founded in real-life, believable scenarios.

People are called to action, or they are not, based on the story.

Stories and Change

Change fails. Sometimes despite all the energy thrown at it, it fails.

People remember failed change. In many cases they avoided it, fought it, and refused to cooperate with it so strongly that eventually, it failed.

Humans tend to follow patterns. When something works, they stick with it.

Makes sense, right?

In matters of change, resistance is sometimes a learned behavior. Fight what scares you, fight what you don’t like or understand, and fight long enough, you’ll win. It becomes a pattern.

The fight against it probably starts with a story. The wrong kind of story. An unbelievable story or one that absolutely presents itself as a fairy tale.

A fairy tale might be fun. An escape from reality, the Sci-Fi movie, or a murder mystery. Drama stories might capture your heart, cause a tear, and have a happy ending.

Most are based more on fiction rather than fact. The change they may spark is imaginary. It’s not real world.

Real World Stories

Workplace or organizational change isn’t launched with fairy tales. They aren’t about Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, or Jack and the Beanstalk.

If you’re going to successfully launch a change, start with real world stories. They are believable and that is what makes them successful.

People want transparency and they want authenticity. They are attracted to those stories because they are real. They’re believable.

Belief is one of the most powerful engines in our psyche.

Is your change believable?

Belief starts with a good story.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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local experience

Local Experience, Does It Really Matter?

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Is the best talent in your backyard, or must it come from somewhere outside of the normal reach? Does local experience matter?

In Pennsylvania, people believe they know their beer and potato chips. Popular beers come from Yuengling or Straub. Potato chips are often Middleswarth or Utz.

When you travel to Colorado or California, they’ll tell you about different beer and potato chips.

Who has the best?

It depends on who you ask.

Available Everywhere

In the 1970’s and 1980’s mail order companies started to thrive. The U.S. infrastructure supported reaching beyond local borders. A growing and thriving trucking industry and 800 numbers made a difference.

By the late 1990’s and into the early 2000’s a shift was happening. It was the infrastructure that supported the widespread use of the internet.

Our borders from county to county and state to state seemed smaller and less significant. Highways improved, automobiles got better, and more products began to fall into the category of a commodity.

What’s next?

When it comes to talent and business opportunity what’s next may be closer than it has been in 50 years.

Local Experience

What is happening in 2020 is a shift. A pivot to something different. It is not defined yet but people will shape the shift.

It will come down to who is right. Defined by people.

In Pennsylvania people are right. In Colorado or California, they’re right. The same goes for Texas, Alabama, or South Dakota. People are right.

How will things change for your workforce and talent acquisition? If you are in Mount Vernon, South Dakota how is that different from New Berlin, New York? What about San Diego, California or Boston, Massachusetts, are there differences?

If you are a job seeker, where will you look?

It seems plausible that people will do what they believe is right. Now more than ever.

Local maybe the biggest comeback of this century.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and culture expert. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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