Tag Archives: workplace

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trusted truth

Trusted Truth Is The Path For Consistent Success

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Persuasion seems to happen without purpose. People talk about what they like, what they saw, and how it felt. Are your messages trusted truth or just your opinions?

You have probably heard to be cautious when dealing with the used car salesperson. The used car salesperson is a stigma, a stigma often associated with getting you to buy in to just about anything that is being said.

Opinions are Slippery

In everyday life people typically speak through opinions.

We ate at the best restaurant.

We watched this movie last night, it was the best movie ever. 

I don’t go to Starbucks. I go only to Dunkin Donuts their coffee is so much better. 

In the workplace it takes on a different form.

The staff meetings are always boring.

He never completes his work on time and is always late.

I know the boss hates me. She criticizes everything I do.

All these statements may be far from fact. Are they trusted truth? Unlikely.

The best restaurant is an opinion. Words like always boring, never on time, and criticizes everything are probably nothing more than an opinion.

One of the biggest challenges for all this rhetoric is that those who are not really listening treat it as trusted truth.

It gets even worse when interactions are so opinionated that it is a truth when the message is delivered by one party, but another different party is shamed to not have any credibility with a similar message.

Trusted Truth

When you really want to make a difference in your conversations. When you want to bring trusted truth to your meetings and other workplace interactions you have to deliver facts.

Facts are much more consistent and reliable. Your operation, values, and beliefs when based on facts have greater merit. Operational systems work better and produce consistent results. Outcomes are more predictable and qualified.

Nearly always, your opinion cannot be a trusted truth.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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personal frame

Personal Frame and Where We Belong

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We tend to put everything in a frame. Our favorite pictures, a diploma, and even our capabilities. Others put us in a frame too. What is your personal frame and does it help or does it somehow make you less?

Work Frames

We attend meetings at work. The entire meeting and its associated outcomes are often conditioned by a frame. Some like the frame, some strongly dislike it.

The frame helps give it all structure. It may speed up processing and at the same time it may limit positive change and prolong problem resolution.

The people within the frame, are framed.

After working with others for some time we tend to have a feel for what they’ll say and how they may say it. We have an idea how they’ll interact and where they will stand on a subject.

This too, is both good and bad. There are positive and likely negative consequences.

While you are inclusive in the frame, you also have your own frame. A place they have placed you. Psychologically, they have given you a label. Smart, silly, bossy, quiet, big ego, or even a push over. People believe they know what they’ll get.

The real question then becomes what frame have you placed yourself in?

Personal Frame

Do you believe you belong in the meeting? Are you good enough, too good, or growing into it? Are you more of an observer, just wanting to have a seat at the table to keep a pulse on the action?

You’ve given yourself your own label. It is the place where you fit. As part of the group you know the ebb and flow, you will likely follow it, always.

It may be confidence, or a lack of it. Your personal frame will guide everything that happens next.

Avoid labeling yourself as not good enough, inferior, or not belonging. Chances are good you’ll live up to your own expectations.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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models

Role Models & Marinade, Underneath It’s Still Chicken

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Who are your role models? Many will suggest that role models are important for success. Not to be copied or duplicated, but to learn from and expand your intellect, value, and worth.

Have your role models created an unrealistic expectation?

Expectations and Reality

On social media it seems that everyone is living the dream, they have the perfect beach picture, the kiddos birthday party, and the hottest car. They also have a flawless complexion, the best smile, and the brightest eyes.

Dr. Hook always wanted to see his picture on the cover of the Rolling Stone. A sense of accomplishment, value, and worth. The feeling of, we made it.

Role models, an image, is it all that it is meant to be? Are role models a positive tactic or do they create unrealistic expectations? Is reality TV really a reality?

Confusion of fantasy and reality seems much easier to create today.

False Perceptions

Technology connected to social media helps us change images, improve complexion, and whiten teeth faster than we can get fries at the McDonald’s drive through lane.

Mainstream news channels feature anchors who are prepped with makeup, hair, and the perfect outfit. We have movie stars with capped teeth, cosmetic surgery, and what appears to be a life of glamour. Yet, they’re all just people.

Role Models

Role models are valuable. They can help us learn and grow. They can give us something to aspire to, motivation to put in the hard work, and develop a sense of pride, accomplishment, and worth.

Role models can also set unrealistic expectations, increase anxiety, and lower self-esteem.

It is always important to keep in mind that underneath all the glamour, the fame, and the clever filter used on the picture, we are all just people.

The President of the business where you work, just a person. The glamour model who looks perfect, just a person. Your friend from high school with the perfect family, kids, and career, still just a person.

You can throw some chicken in marinade for hours, it may look different and taste different, but underneath it is still just chicken.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+

 


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Building trust

Building Trust, Faux Harmony, and Fitting In

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Working with people you trust makes the most sense. Building trust can be a delicate pursuit. Is it really trust you are after, or are you looking for faux harmony?

Nearly everyone in the workplace will agree that they want trust. They want their co-workers to trust their ideas, contributions, and promises. Yet nearly everyone has a story of deceit, promises and contributions that weren’t kept, and how a defensive position feels safer.

Feels Safe

The concept then takes on a different goal, the goal of safety.

Challenging the status quo is not an option because you’ll end up on the list of people who are struck from advancement.

So you don’t make any waves. You navigate the system carefully and do everything that you can to fit in, quietly.

When your pursuit becomes the pursuit of safety that really means you’re goal is to fit in. Fitting in is important. Often the person with the best fit is the person who gets hired. Fitting in is a good strategy in certain situations, but it also a challenging strategy when you seek advancement.

Fitting In

The quickest way to be overlooked is to fit in, perfectly. The quickest way to start building trust is to keep your commitments, do good work, and do it consistently.

A culture of workplace trust means that people know what to expect and when. Conditioning everything you do based on fitting in doesn’t mean you’ll be trusted. It means you’ll be another face in the crowd.

A crowd that is always silent and stands for nothing is an untrusted crowd. Trust isn’t always about fitting in. In fact, those who are truly trusted probably never fit perfectly.

Building Trust

For some, the situation creates who they are, and for others they create the situation. Being trusted is more important than faux harmony. Building trust is not the same as working to fit in.

No one said it would be easy.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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lucky timing

Lucky Timing and Leveraging Your Persistence

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Show me someone who is successful and I will show you someone who has been called lucky. Lucky timing seems to be one of the most popular reasons that many people cite for those who achieve success.

When you go in too early, or a little too late, the stars may not be in alignment, no alignment, no success.  Is it really about lucky timing?

Right Time

Ask around and you’ll find many people who are waiting on the right time. The right time to make an investment, buy a new car, or launch their million dollar idea. Certainly, timing has relevance, but it may not be as significant as the recognition it gets.

When you spot someone who gets more opportunities is that because of luck or persistence? Before you jump right in to the shoulder deep water and suggest that timing is everything, I would suggest only sticking in a toe.

There is a good chance that more luck will happen to people who are diligently leveraging everything they do, persistently, across time.

Let’s face it, most people who find a four leaf clover are looking around on the ground to spot one. Lucky to find one, yes maybe, but you must be looking first.

More Opportunities

Lucky timing is what you do every day to create more opportunities. It is the daily grind, the early mornings, the late evenings, the commitment of time and energy.

Sure, you’ll see the advertisements for get rich quick schemes. You will see the magnificent MLM programs promising a big return on little investment. Things that promise a work from home in your spare time or the social media business secret you should know may also seem tempting.

Lucky Timing

Las Vegas wasn’t built on big payouts at the casinos. Most get rich quick or get rich easy schemes only fill the pockets of the person in the chain of connections before you. Not always, but it is probably safe to say, most of the time.

The best way to get lucky timing is to leverage your persistence. Your grit, determination, and commitment to the daily grind are probably the best way to get lucky.

It only looks easy.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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volunteering

Volunteering and a Promise Kept

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Enthusiasm is a great thing. Most workplaces praise those who are enthusiastic. Are you volunteering for things you cannot deliver? Are you just hanging out or are you offering to constructively jump in and get things done?

Fresh Enthusiasm

Sometimes it is in the heat of the moment. You hear the new idea, you feel the fresh enthusiasm and you want to be an integral part of building something great. In fact, you may see it as a legacy building moment. Something you can get your good name attached to.

Being on the committee or team means you have a responsibility. Certainly some of your responsibility is to help make good decisions and drive future direction. Do you volunteer for action items that spark your interest and imagination? Are you one of the first to raise your hand, or are you the last?

Showing up at the meeting is important and being on time helps. Being the person who jumps in to offer assistance, to volunteer, or to shout out that you’ll lead is great. Are you able to keep that commitment?

Unspoken List

There is often an unspoken but lengthy list of volunteers who offered to help, expressed a deep commitment, and after a short burst of activity, they failed to keep things moving.

If you want to lose credibility, breakdown trust, and tarnish your reputation, failing to perform after you’ve promised is a fool proof method.

Volunteering

When you view yourself on the podium, picture yourself getting the praise, or leaving a legacy that shapes the future it seems like a good idea to raise your hand. You may even be thinking about a monetary increase or job promotion. This is the fun and easy part.

The hard part is actually making it happen. When it comes to volunteering keeping your promise is more critical than most people realize.

Did you keep your last promise?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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workplace civility

Workplace Civility, Does Your Organization Have It?

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There are those organizations that don’t believe they need workplace civility. Often this is because they don’t recognize that there are differences between their culture and what the front runners know to be more civil.

While workplace civility is subjective, the results are often reflected in employee performance. Employee performance is reflected on the income statement. It may be hard to develop a metric for civility. However, it is easy to develop a metric for other areas of human performance.

The organization that practices civility is diverse. Not because they claim that they are, but because there is evidence that they are. Evidence would include employment of protected classes. However, that is really just the beginning and may be viewed as a technicality, not a true reflection of organizational culture.

Civil Organizational Cultures

Civil and diverse organizations work hard to keep everything and everyone together. Their habits are consistent with what they preach. Conflict is well managed. Patience is a core value, and if you can’t handle what is happening, a team member will be sure to help.

An underlying philosophy may be that we help each other do well and that is why we are growing.

Room for Improvement

An organizational culture lacking in civility will see things a little bit differently. They often have principles and core values connected with only the strong survive. Rewards are only at the top, bottom feeders are accepted as feeders only, and are feed just enough to prevent starvation.

There is harmful conflict. Those who can’t handle it, are not helped or reinforced, they are told to get out of the way and ridiculed for short-comings. Only the favorites or those who navigate organizational politics well are long-term survivors.

Workplace Civility

Certainly, organizations need all the demographic evidence. Evidence such as hiring across all classes including those that are protected. Yes, they’ll have the diversity posters in the lunch room and near the Human Resources offices, and of course, they’ll express no tolerance for harassment or bullying.

They’ll insist on safety, and they’ll understand that the person who occupies space at the workplace the longest is not necessarily accomplishing the most.

Meal breaks are honored, or better yet, insisted upon. Not because the organization feels that they should, but because they know it makes human performance better and the people healthier. The idea of skipping lunch means I’m working harder doesn’t apply.

Vacations are embraced, generosity is demonstrated, and the importance of family is well supported.

None of this means the people don’t work hard and none of it suggests that there is room for slackers. It is only a reflection of civility. Does your organization practice workplace civility?

A good question is, “What is your culture?”  A better question is, “What is your culture when you think no one is watching?”

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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workplace contribution

What Is Your Workplace Contribution?

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Often people view their workplace as a place to earn a paycheck. Certainly for work outside of volunteering this is a truism. Should more people be assessing their workplace contribution?

Many people begin their commute with nearly the same intentions every day. Go to work, get to my work area, start my job, do a few things, and then go home. For some it is much more than that.

Building a Career

People who are engaged, those who want to make a difference, those who are building a career often have a little different viewpoint.

When career minded people go to work, they break things, they fix things that are broke, they build something, risk something, make decisions, have accomplishments, please a customer, help a co-worker, and occasionally fail in any of these attempts.

Where Is The Value

The person who is really contributing does all of this and so much more. It is work. It is called work because it is often hard and it isn’t always about what you are getting for it, it is also about what you become for it.

Perhaps too many people view their job in the wrong way. Instead of analyzing how much time you spend doing stuff, what if you measured how much value you are delivering. The most value doesn’t come from what you’re taking, it comes from what you are giving.

Where are you adding the most value? How much is that worth? Is it cost savings or revenue producing? Is whatever you are doing timely? Will it be the best prioritization of your efforts?

Workplace Contribution

Your workplace contribution matters. It should be measured because we know, “what gets measured gets done.” Value may be a bit nebulous for some, but it makes all of the difference for the organization.

Maybe it is time to start thinking about something different on your commute. Think about how you will provide the most value.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Career encouragement

Career Encouragement, Is It Time To Give More?

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In the workplace, goals are often measured against management expectations, historical data, or industry benchmarks. How do goals align with career accomplishments? Do we need more career encouragement?

Winning Little League baseball teams often pop up out of nowhere from a small otherwise unknown town. The football star was just an average kid who loved the sport and played anywhere a few kids could find a patch of grass. The kid who read books all the time went on to become a PhD, a medical doctor, or an engineer.

Born or Made

In leadership seminars I often ask, “Are great leaders born or made?” Participants stop to think, and ponder this simple question. Of course, in some cultures family heritage has something to do with those in power but in US culture this is not the case.

Leadership is something built, it is learned, and the best are committed to it. Is encouragement required to become great? Does feedback affect outcomes of success or a lack of it?

Encouragement and Trophies

Encouragement became popular with the participation trophy generation. The idea may have been that more encouragement led to great things. Give every kid a trophy, it is encouraging. People forgot though that the reality of life is not always so kind.

Are you building your career? Are you encouraging someone to build their own?

History Says

In the history of the United States, there have only been forty five Presidents. For General Motors, there have only been fourteen CEO’s, and perhaps there has only been one Albert Einstein, one Wernher von Braun, and one Charles Darwin.

Do genetics, family history, or a high intelligence quotient have something to do with success, perhaps, in some ways, yes. Others may cite luck, more opportunity, and the best connections as having a hand in success. Still, success seems to pop up from anywhere.

Encouragement and Confidence

People often become very good at something that interests them. Chances are great that interest sparked and grew to flames when encouragement boosted confidence. When pleasing onlookers felt rewarding and when the responsibility perform felt achievable.

Careers are often built from self-interests and a focus on successive accomplishments across time.

Career Encouragement

Not every ball player will turn pro, and of the many who do, only very few will leave a lasting mark in the record books. Only a few will become President of the United States, few will be the CEO of a century old business, and even fewer will lead monumental discoveries in science or physics.

One thing seems certain though, the people who work for something better and who are encouraged often attain it.

A career is built, career encouragement helps those on their journey to attain it.

Now is a good time to give more.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Emotional labor matters

Why Emotional Labor Matters More

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The daily grind, the grit and effort it takes to go to work every day, to exist in the World of workplace politics, the boss’s pets, and a paycheck every other week. It is what millions of people feel about their job, it is laborious. Do you think emotional labor matters?

Frequent Questions

Many people have great jobs. Many people take for granted what their daily grind provides. Actually, that emotional labor that they are putting in, that is what will matter the most.

What high school did you attend?

Where did you get your degree?

Did you get your degree online?

The questions all appear to matter and they are the essence of the job applicant, the hiring committee, or the card puncher. What may really matter the most is if you have put in the emotional labor.

Attitude, Determination, and Persistence

Emotional labor answers the questions about your attitude towards work, your discipline across the long haul, and your ability to navigate shifting environments.

The questions that really need answered are more about what you’ve accomplished. How do you face adversity? What projects or teams have you led? What is your decision making style? How would you describe your level of integrity? How do you plan for the unplanned?

The online job application and your resume don’t often speak to what you are really capable of doing. The weight of who you are, your strength, determination, and the associated outcomes are not about a piece of paper, or your digital application.

Getting to the door and having it open often comes from your resume or curriculum vitae, but that is just a paper trail.

Emotional Labor Matters

What matters more is the illustration of your emotional labor. That will be the best determinate of your future success.

When people ask my opinion about what will happen next with an employee, a boss, or their significant other, I usually suggest that the best predictor of future performance is past performance.

Put in the emotional labor, it matters more.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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