Tag Archives: training

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developing Middle managers

Developing Middle Managers : Series 2

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Dennis is back at his alma mater, Penn State University, working with Penn State Executive Programs and the Smeal College of Business.

PROGRAM FEE COVERS ALL SIX FULL DAY SESSIONS!

With Today’s flatter, leaner organizational structures much more is expected of the mid-level manager in delivering organizational results. Because they must rely more on cross-functional resources rather than dwindling direct reports, their communication, influencing, and networking skills are critical to success. Developing Middle Managers provides key competencies of management beyond the typical supervisory skill set. Participants will learn how to apply planning, organizing, and optimizing performance within their spheres of influence delivered through six full days of a highly interactive classroom experience complemented with online resource tools.

Developing Middle Managers

There are two series consisting of three full days each. Dennis will be splitting duties with another instructor. (Each instructor will do approximately 50 percent of the three day series.)

Series 1: Effective Management Practices and Improving Personal Effectiveness (October 16 – 18)

Series 2: Improving Personal Effectiveness, Organizational Cultures and Change (November 6 – 8)

 

Register at the event (website) URL, or for additional information or questions please call 814-865-3435

 

 

 


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developing Middle managers

Developing Middle Managers : Series 1

Tags : 

Dennis is back at his alma mater, Penn State University, working with Penn State Executive Programs and the Smeal College of Business.

PROGRAM FEE COVERS ALL SIX FULL DAY SESSIONS!

With Today’s flatter, leaner organizational structures much more is expected of the mid-level manager in delivering organizational results. Because they must rely more on cross-functional resources rather than dwindling direct reports, their communication, influencing, and networking skills are critical to success. Developing Middle Managers provides key competencies of management beyond the typical supervisory skill set. Participants will learn how to apply planning, organizing, and optimizing performance within their spheres of influence delivered through six full days of a highly interactive classroom experience complemented with online resource tools.

Developing Middle Managers

There are two series consisting of three full days each. Dennis will be splitting duties with another instructor. (Each instructor will do approximately 50 percent of the three day series.)

Series 1: Effective Management Practices and Improving Personal Effectiveness (October 16 – 18)

Series 2: Improving Personal Effectiveness, Organizational Cultures and Change (November 6 – 8)

 

Register at the event (website) URL, or for additional information or questions please call 814-865-3435

 

 

 


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developing Middle managers

Developing Middle Managers : Module 3

Tags : 

Dennis is back at his alma mater, Penn State University, working with Penn State Executive Programs and the Smeal College of Business.

PROGRAM FEE COVERS ALL SIX FULL DAY SESSIONS!

With Today’s flatter, leaner organizational structures much more is expected of the mid-level manager in delivering organizational results. Because they must rely more on cross-functional resources rather than dwindling direct reports, their communication, influencing, and networking skills are critical to success. Developing Middle Managers provides key competencies of management beyond the typical supervisory skill set. Participants will learn how to apply planning, organizing, and optimizing performance within their spheres of influence delivered through six full days of a highly interactive classroom experience complemented with online resource tools.

Developing Middle Managers

There are three modules, each two full days in length. Dennis will be splitting duties with another instructor. (Each instructor has one of the two days.)

Module 1: Effective Management Practices (April 30 & May 1)

Module 2: Improving Personal Effectiveness (May 30 & May 31)

Module 3: Organizational Cultures and Change (June 14 & June 15)

 

Register at the event (website) URL, or for additional information or questions please call 814-865-3435

 

 

 


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developing Middle managers

Developing Middle Managers : Module 2

Tags : 

Dennis is back at his alma mater, Penn State University, working with Penn State Executive Programs and the Smeal College of Business.

PROGRAM FEE COVERS ALL SIX FULL DAY SESSIONS!

With Today’s flatter, leaner organizational structures much more is expected of the mid-level manager in delivering organizational results. Because they must rely more on cross-functional resources rather than dwindling direct reports, their communication, influencing, and networking skills are critical to success. Developing Middle Managers provides key competencies of management beyond the typical supervisory skill set. Participants will learn how to apply planning, organizing, and optimizing performance within their spheres of influence delivered through six full days of a highly interactive classroom experience complemented with online resource tools.

Developing Middle Managers

There are three modules, each two full days in length. Dennis will be splitting duties with another instructor. (Each instructor has one of the two days.)

Module 1: Effective Management Practices (April 30 & May 1)

Module 2: Improving Personal Effectiveness (May 30 & May 31)

Module 3: Organizational Cultures and Change (June 14 & June 15)

 

Register at the event (website) URL, or for additional information or questions please call 814-865-3435

 

 

 


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Interesting Story

Interesting Story, Now I Get It

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People have told stories for thousands of years. Is story telling the way we learn, grow, and become more successful? Do you have an interesting story?

Story Value

Go to any museum and you may wonder about the story. The artifacts are there, they are clearly visible and on display. We can often read a short version of history on a plaque or push a button to get an audio version. This helps us connect, but we still don’t always know the story.

If we are shopping for a used car, we may want to know the story. When we go to a new small town, or a mom and pop restaurant we may wonder, “What is the story here?”

Better yet, watch an episode of American Pickers or Pawn Stars. When they buy something, they want to know the story. Often you’ll hear the stars of these shows ask about the story and declare a perceived value based mostly on, you guessed it, the story.

Interesting Story

In the workplace, our connection with purpose, why we do what we do, is meaningless without the story.

When we are in training seminars or workshops the value of the training is increased with the story.

You’ve likely heard of death by PowerPoint. You’ve witnessed the endless slide decks that could simply be displayed while the participants watch and read. There is not really a need for the so-called, presenter.

When you want buy-in for your change. When you want your employee teams to learn more, be more, and connect more, you may want to consider the story. Most employable people can talk about or read a slide deck.

When you attend the meeting, go to a seminar, or take a seat in the grand ballroom at the conference the question you really want to know the answer to is, “Do you have an interesting story?”

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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need training

They Need Training, As The Leader I Don’t

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More common than you may think, the finger is pointing the wrong way. It seems pretty silly, but authority often gives the power of the point. Pointing to this, or pointing to that, and proclaiming a lack of change is the problem. Does your organization need training?

Adapt or Change

One often forgotten part of training is that training means change. Sometimes the boss will point out who needs training, but in his or her mind that means everyone else needs to adapt to their style and way of doing things.

This could be a great idea. It could also be a voice that screams divide and conquer. Conformity under duress is not consensus.

Scorned Employees

Many organizations have scorned employee teams. Employees who have been punished for trying a new way, expressing a different thought, or not abiding by the directions of the boss. Certainly, this may be a balancing act for any employee, and for their boss.

The best path, the one that feels safe, is the path of not too much or too little, just the right amount.

Why are employees sometimes punished for trying to make things better? Is it fear that causes the punishment?

Fear of Inferior

I will never forget the boss who wouldn’t participate in the playful online IQ test. The boss who shared with me how he will have to, “knock her down a few pegs,” because she spoke out of turn in a meeting. And a boss who advised your only role in the meeting is to listen, not contribute.

Another all-time favorite for the list are the bosses who want assessments for the team but are absolutely not interested the same assessment for themselves.

There are countless times that a business owner has recommended training when the front-line team is not the only place that training is needed.

Need Training

There are so many ways to engage, to inspire, and to lead. The small business owner, the boss, or the otherwise noted workplace leader should recommend training and be open to employee development. Not doing so would be such a waste.

One question the leader should always ask, “Are WE getting better?”

Training applies to everyone.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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developing Middle managers

Developing Middle Managers : Module 1

Tags : 

Dennis is back at his alma mater, Penn State University, working with Penn State Executive Programs and the Smeal College of Business.

PROGRAM FEE COVERS ALL SIX FULL DAY SESSIONS!

With Today’s flatter, leaner organizational structures much more is expected of the mid-level manager in delivering organizational results. Because they must rely more on cross-functional resources rather than dwindling direct reports, their communication, influencing, and networking skills are critical to success. Developing Middle Managers provides key competencies of management beyond the typical supervisory skill set. Participants will learn how to apply planning, organizing, and optimizing performance within their spheres of influence delivered through six full days of a highly interactive classroom experience complemented with online resource tools.

Developing Middle Managers

There are three modules, each two full days in length. Dennis will be splitting duties with another instructor. (Each instructor has one of the two days.)

Module 1: Effective Management Practices (April 30 & May 1)

Module 2: Improving Personal Effectiveness (May 30 & May 31)

Module 3: Organizational Cultures and Change (June 14 & June 15)

 

Register at the event (website) URL, or for additional information or questions please call 814-865-3435

 

 

 


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training customers

Are You Training Customers or Is It My Imagination?

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Marketers, account managers, and brands all have something in common. They want to achieve more sales, build the brand, and make the most of their high value customers. Are you training customers? Do you realize what you are teaching them?

Our professional business interactions are driven largely by emotion. As people we act and react to joy, pain, and adversity. Many business people will suggest that everyone should remove the emotion, but the act of trying removing emotion is driven by emotion.

Businesses and organizations everywhere are conditioning their clients and customers for future interactions. As people of emotion and habit, we learn to adapt to situations. What we learn leads us to make decisions and choices that our connected with our past experiences.

Training Customers

Our restaurant is closed on Monday.  Later the restaurant wonders why business is off. Monday is a business day and people want lunch. The people don’t remember what day, they just know that they are not always open.

Every weekend we have a sale. Why go there on Tuesday, just wait to see what happens on the weekend. Otherwise, you’ll pay too much.

We will email you sixteen times before the sale ends.  No need to act now. I will be notified repeatedly. Maybe something else comes along and I don’t act at all. I also don’t trust or understand the deadline.

When I call, I can get a better rate. (Hotels) Don’t use the online registration system, they charge more there. Continue calling a staff that is untrained and unavailable since the hotel strategy is to move reservations to the online system.

You: I want to cancel my subscription. Vendor: Wait, I can give you a better deal. Punish the auto-renew or higher lifetime value customers. Who cares, they are not planning to cancel.

Punishment

Do you believe your business or organization has a customer centric focus? Do you have a culture of service? How are you training customers?

Are you training them the right way or punishing them to fit your agenda?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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simulation experience

Simulation Experience, It Is Not The Real Thing

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Are simulations and real life experiences the same thing? When we want to change or transform an organizational culture, can we do it through simulation? Do you have simulation experience or the real thing?

Real or Simulation

In our organizations, we can experience safety training, productivity training, or be warned of what is, or is not, harassment.

We may also get training about culture, leadership, and the importance of delivering exceptional service.

I can play a fifty-nine minute video on my sixty-inch television that looks like a fireplace burning. This is a simulation. Sure I can turn up the heat and put on some ambiance music and make it all seem pretty cool. Is this the same as the real deal? What have I just experienced?

Is the video game, the scary movie, or reality TV show the same as real-life experiences? We sometimes like to think so, it gives us an experience but that experience exists within a safety zone. It is not real. The consequences are different and as a result so are the experiences.

Simulation Experience

When people have had a close call, a near to the real experience, experience, it may be enough to alter behaviors. It seems that the key may be to simulate as much as possible to create the feeling of reality. This is still, always, simulation experience.

So when we want to transform an organization. When we want to deliver a better sales experience, better customer service, and have a culture of growth and inspiration. A simulation may not be enough.

We can’t live within the comfort of safety that is provided by the simulation. The real thing has to occur. Sure, we may get inspired or motivated to attempt a positive change, but until we actually experience it, it is just a simulation.

The simulation experience provides safety. It shields us psychologically from the real thing.

That makes it pretty easy to turn off the transformation and go back to the comfort of our safety zone.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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momentum

The Incredible Power Of Momentum

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Jokes often center on New Year resolutions. We hear about the fitness program, the special diet, or the financial savings program. Correcting our bad habits, our vices, and even the worn out tradition will stand a better chance of success with momentum.

Incredible Power

One of the best metaphors for momentum is what I call the train story.

The story is a nickel placed on the track in front of the wheel of a train before it starts moving will make it very difficult to get started. However, a nickel placed on the rail long in advance of the on-coming train and the train will crush it as if it isn’t even there.

Momentum is powerful. Get things rolling and sometimes they are hard to stop.

Momentum does require some energy though, and often care. You have to care enough about the fitness program, the special diet, or financial savings.

On The Job

The same is true for the momentum of anything in our workplace. This is especially true for organizational development endeavors, things such as training programs, coaching, and other developmental activities.

Imagine if we exercised only once every two months, or imagine if we insisted that we were on a special diet but only followed it one day a week. What would our results look like? Simple right, the results would be less than desirable.

When people think about career development, it isn’t a one and done. Anyone progressive is always continuing to learn, practice, and grow. The same is true for employee development.

Momentum

Sure, we can send someone to the workshop or seminar where all the tips and techniques are carefully delivered by an expert. However, if the employee doesn’t practice, doesn’t follow up, or doesn’t commit to continuous improvement not much changes for the long-term.

So many people and organizations treat training and development as an information source. The idea is that we need the information, so tell us. This is often true, and results do occur. Often great results. The biggest struggle though is not the knowledge transfer, it is the continuation of the effort.

We should remember that the power of momentum is not so much about knowing, it is much more about doing.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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  1. Developing Middle Managers : Series 1

    October 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  2. Developing Middle Managers : Series 2

    November 6 @ 8:00 am - November 8 @ 5:00 pm

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