Tag Archives: success

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powerful belief

Powerful Belief and the Facts Surrounding It

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Believe you are going to have a good day or a bad day, and you will find lots of evidence to support your belief. Belief has an amazing effect on performance. Do you have powerful belief?

We see it in religion, in politics, and with innovation. Belief often creates power. Have you considered how your belief is guiding your outcomes?

Just the Facts

“Show me the facts!” is often proclaimed as a requirement to establish belief. Yet, much of our discussion, our presentations, and what is repeated is based on theory or opinion.

In the business meeting when people are looking for a reason why the strategy won’t work, they’ll probably find some. Of course, in contrast when the group seeks reasons why something may work or is worth a try, they’ll likely find some.

People with experiences (we all have some) want to share those experiences as facts. We tried this once, it didn’t work, and that is a fact.

Manifested facts become beliefs, and beliefs manifested are often presented as facts.

Seeing Is Believing

We believe what we see. Throughout many forms of media, the persuasion to buy this product so you can look like me, feel like me, and have success like me is overwhelming.

Social media attempts to remind us of how people live large, have luxurious homes, vacations, and “life is good.” We also see some of the opposite. The bad boss story, the customer service horror stories, and the passing of people and pets.

We live surrounded by stories of fame and fortune. And stories of tragedy and gloom. There is not much room for average, yet on the bell curve it is exactly where most people or businesses exist.

Powerful Belief

Powerful belief happens every day. It is connected to decisions, a choice, and what you look for.

Most of what comes true for your career, for sales revenue, or the marketing plan starts with belief.

You decide what you’ll look for. The why’s or the why not’s.

You’ll find it and you’ll believe it.

Powerful.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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fear success

Do You Fear Change or Fear Success?

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We know change is happening, sometimes to our liking, and sometimes not so much. Fear change or fear success, which one do you fear, or is it both? What causes you to think twice about your next move?

Growth is Success

Years ago, I planted one hundred tiny twigs (Ligustrum amurense) in a row across the front of my property. It was going to change the front of my property. Privacy, beauty, and a lot of work.

Successful growth of the plants meant change. Cutting, trimming, care along the bottom, and care on the top. A great place for leaves to pile up in the fall.

Was there some fear of success? Certainly, I had an idea what was coming. There was going to be a lot of work and care involved. I planted them, it worked, things changed.

Fear Change

Any time we start something new, any time someone suggests a change, the fear of success may be just as important to consider as the fear of failure.

Most people blame the fear of failure as the reason people don’t like change. Certainly, failure is a possible outcome, but so is success.

The status quo is comfortable. People know and understand the workload. Groups have normalized (Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, Bruce W. Tuckman) and are performing. The outcome is generally known, the atmosphere feels stable. There is a sense of safety.

When a change is about to occur, the stability is threatened. There is new risk with an unknown outcome. Of course, if the change fails, not much will really be different.

Considering that change you see coming, do you fear success?

Fear Success

Vinyl, imitation clapboard, is popular for modern suburban home siding. It doesn’t change as often as the wooden clapboard of yesteryear. There is less fear of maintenance. A change that is desirable, no fear of more work, things stay stable longer.

The kids want a new puppy, with a new puppy comes change. Sure, who doesn’t love a cute puppy, but with the puppy comes a lot of care.

A house with a bigger yard, an apple tree, and a swimming pool would be nice. Well, on second thought, that seems like a lot of work.

Change is scary, it is really scary when it works.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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attraction matters

Attraction Matters For Your Success

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There are people who don’t like baseball, apple pie, and certain automobile manufacturers. Who do you appeal to, who is in your crowd, your network, or your tribe? Do you believe attraction matters?

To some extent we all sell, we all market, and we all deliver a customer service promise. We do it in business, and we do it person to person without a formal business model or plan. Wouldn’t it be great to connect with lots of people who share in the same or similar aspirations for life, community, or career?

Much of this may depend on your market reach, where you spend your time, and what your formal philosophy on life is all about.

Habits Create Culture

I’ve tried to convince some coaching clients to read more. I’ve even presented them with the idea that they may read more than they realize, why not do it more constructively? It matters for some, but for others they just never indulge.

Podcasts are popular in some circles, but everyone wants to know the best of the best first, without really shopping around. These are limits, limited beliefs, values, and ways of doing things.

Values and traditions, they of course build what we call culture. Is the culture where you work strained? Is it because everyone is like minded or is it because of different values, beliefs, and traditions? Are those differences managed constructively or destructively?

Attraction Matters

Do you believe attraction matters? Whatever you do for your business, what you do for your customers, or what you do to grow your career, will always matter most to those who are interested.

People who don’t get involved with social media, they don’t really care about social media. People who don’t like football, NASCAR, or reality TV won’t tune in and they won’t see your masterful thirty second commercial.

When people don’t like to read, they probably won’t. When they don’t like social media they probably won’t join. An organization that doesn’t see a bigger future probably won’t care much about your career.

Everything that you do or want to accomplish will only happen in an atmosphere that embraces what you are selling.

It is true for advancing your career, for selling your product, or for building an effective team.

People who don’t connect with it will probably never buy it.

Attraction matters.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect,Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Career encouragement

Career Encouragement, Is It Time To Give More?

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In the workplace, goals are often measured against management expectations, historical data, or industry benchmarks. How do goals align with career accomplishments? Do we need more career encouragement?

Winning Little League baseball teams often pop up out of nowhere from a small otherwise unknown town. The football star was just an average kid who loved the sport and played anywhere a few kids could find a patch of grass. The kid who read books all the time went on to become a PhD, a medical doctor, or an engineer.

Born or Made

In leadership seminars I often ask, “Are great leaders born or made?” Participants stop to think, and ponder this simple question. Of course, in some cultures family heritage has something to do with those in power but in US culture this is not the case.

Leadership is something built, it is learned, and the best are committed to it. Is encouragement required to become great? Does feedback affect outcomes of success or a lack of it?

Encouragement and Trophies

Encouragement became popular with the participation trophy generation. The idea may have been that more encouragement led to great things. Give every kid a trophy, it is encouraging. People forgot though that the reality of life is not always so kind.

Are you building your career? Are you encouraging someone to build their own?

History Says

In the history of the United States, there have only been forty five Presidents. For General Motors, there have only been fourteen CEO’s, and perhaps there has only been one Albert Einstein, one Wernher von Braun, and one Charles Darwin.

Do genetics, family history, or a high intelligence quotient have something to do with success, perhaps, in some ways, yes. Others may cite luck, more opportunity, and the best connections as having a hand in success. Still, success seems to pop up from anywhere.

Encouragement and Confidence

People often become very good at something that interests them. Chances are great that interest sparked and grew to flames when encouragement boosted confidence. When pleasing onlookers felt rewarding and when the responsibility perform felt achievable.

Careers are often built from self-interests and a focus on successive accomplishments across time.

Career Encouragement

Not every ball player will turn pro, and of the many who do, only very few will leave a lasting mark in the record books. Only a few will become President of the United States, few will be the CEO of a century old business, and even fewer will lead monumental discoveries in science or physics.

One thing seems certain though, the people who work for something better and who are encouraged often attain it.

A career is built, career encouragement helps those on their journey to attain it.

Now is a good time to give more.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Better habits

Better Habits And Your Personal Masterpiece

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Do you need better habits? Human capability is amazing. When you study anything historical, you’ll find that the human race has accomplished astounding things in a very short period of time. What you do with your life or your career is often based on simple things called habits.

Many suggest that we are creatures of habit. We spend our lives waking to morning routines, which turn into daily routines, then evening routines, and after some sleep we do it all over again. Is it really that simple? The easy answer is, sort of.

Examine Your Habits

If you drink two or three twenty ounce sodas per day, eat cupcakes and candy bars for lunch, and have pizza four or five times per week you may want to consider some different eating habits.

If you never walk more than a handful of steps between your home, your car, and your workplace, it may be a good idea to get some additional exercise.

We can change our habits. We can eat better with more well balanced meals, we can exercise more, and we can even commit to more learning and personal growth.

The hard part is not knowing what to do. The hard part is changing our habits. Sure, sometimes knowledge is involved, but that theoretically is easy to gain.

Better Habits

What is required for a change in habits?

First, we have to consider giving up what is easy. Society seems to suggest that easy is best. However, taking the stairs instead of the elevator may be a better choice.

Think of everything you do that is easy, the elevator, the nearest parking spot, and the home cleaning service, the pool boy, the landscaper, and fast food. These things are all easy, right?

The second thing we should consider is giving up something we love, pizza or Brussels sprouts, which will it be? What are you drinking? A couple of beers, three sodas, or several glasses of water, which one will you give up?

Personal Masterpiece

Giving up something that is easy, or what we love, is probably the path to a better you. The knowledge of what is required is not hard to obtain. The ideas and paths are plentiful. Having the discipline and persistence to switch to better habits may be much more of a challenge.

You probably already know how to be a bigger contributor to your personal masterpiece.

The question then becomes, “What are you doing about it?”

Ask it often. Give honest answers.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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success planning

Success Planning and Actions That Take You There

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Do you know what you are doing three weeks from now? What about two months from now, do you plan your days, or do they just happen? Have you thought about how success planning matters?

Many people get up every day and go to work. They go through the motions. The path that they are on is the same path every day, the path that appears, what pops up and things that must be done. Is that a plan?

Sure, there is the staff meeting next week, and oh, we are closed for about eight holidays per year. That isn’t really planning though.

Same Thing, Different Day

Days turn into weeks, weeks to months, and months to years. Does your path only change by chance, by luck encounters, or by the actions taken by someone else?

While this message may be a little about discipline that sometimes isn’t the biggest obstacle. Sometimes the biggest obstacle is that people let life happen to them, not make it happen for them.

It is easy to sit back after a few years and wonder what you’ve done. Also easy is to blame someone else if you aren’t where you thought you would be.

Coasting

Everyday people go to work. They take the train, ride a bus, or drive their car. They enter their workspace and start their day, just as they did yesterday. For the most part, it is thoughtless. It is a sequence of actions and behaviors that meet the job requirements.

This is not success planning. This is cruising. Cruising is coasting, you only coast one way, downhill.

Success Planning

If you’re going to make a difference you’re going to have to sell, leap, connect, get involved, give, change, let go, risk, challenge, feel uncomfortable, build a plan, and take action.

Success planning is important, but so is action.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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change readiness appreciative strategies inquiry

Change Readiness, Are You Prepared For Change?

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Ask around, you can find many people who will tell you that they want change. Asking about the desire for change might not be the best question though. You might want to ask them about change readiness.

I often speak to groups about change. I’ve encouraged people to think differently about change in my book, Pivot and Accelerate. It’s common that when I ask people if they want to change or if they are committed to change, they tell me that they are.

It’s interesting though because when it comes to giving up something to replace it with something else they are often not so eager to let go. Perhaps it should be more like an episode of Tiny House Nation, where people are forced to let go of things they might not need.

People who believe that they are interested in changing their future need to discover what they will let go, after all, they want their future to be different, right?

Change Readiness

While there are many things to consider about change here are three important things to think about:

  1. Path of least resistance. This path or something close to it might be what we are naturally drawn towards. There is a good chance that this path won’t produce the kind of change you truly seek.
  2. Test of time. People often cite the test of time. “We’ve always done it this way.” is commonplace when discussions of change pop up. The test of time has relevance, but when you want different results, the test of time might be exactly what is holding you back.
  3. More than one method. A specific course of action is good. It might mean your strategy has focus. Remember though that there is often more than one-way. Insisting on a specific method might limit the potential for a necessary breakthrough.

Fear of Failure

The next time someone brings up the fear of failure, remind them that they really might be more afraid of success.

If you’re serious about discovering more success and you’re willing to give up something to make that happen. Things are about to change.

Are you ready?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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leaders go first

Leaders Go First and Sometimes Last

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We probably all know this more than a century old idiom, “The Captain goes down with the ship.” Should leaders be the front-runners? Do the best leaders jump in first or do they sometimes lead from the back? Do leaders go first, or last?

When you stop to think about it there are probably numerous reasons it could be one, or the other. When you think about your current business trends or the state of the economy for any sector, it might seem reasonable that leaders go first.

Leaders Go First

If you are going to have the hottest new product it might help to be the first to bring it to market.

When you want to capture a business opportunity being the first to get in a proposal might put you in the best position.

It’s true for concert tickets, rush hour traffic, and the limited quantity of the daily special at your favorite restaurant.

Be first or at least be early.

Things are moving really fast. Technology is driving a lot of change. Even socially how we connect has relevance with going first, or at least going early. Never jump in and people will just move on.

Waiting for something, anything, a good word, the right window, or prolonging a decision might mean missing the opportunity. There really isn’t any waiting.

Leaders need to be front-runners. Risk assessed from the back or near the end might be an assessment that is too late.

Sometimes Last

Do leaders sometimes need to go last?

The captain and his ship, probably makes sense. Occasionally a back seat driver might have a view superior to someone in the front. Even being the last to be served at dinner or the last one in line at the food buffet might be polite and demonstrate leadership and respect.

The idea of who goes first and who goes last might not be the right question. The right question might be, “What is the desired outcome?”

Business is seldom awarded for bravery. It is awarded to those who have proven their success, their value, and are timely.

First matters for the race but sometimes the last one at bat wins the game.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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5 Reasons Over-Commitment Might Be Hurting Your Career

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Most people in the workforce want to give their job and career the best they have to give. They work hard, smart, and are committed. Can trying to do too much be hurting your career?

hurting your career

During my career I’ve run into a lot of interesting things in the workplace. At first glance, situations which are almost unbelievable. People sometimes say that love is blind. People who are trying really hard to be impressive in their job might sometimes have blind spots too.

Just like too many donuts, hot wings, or trips to the Chinese buffet, over-commitment might be hurting not helping your situation.

Hurting Your Career

Here are five reasons:

  1. Can’t do everything. Many people are trying to impress. They raise their hand to take on projects with no real consideration that they might be taking on too much. This also sometimes happens when people are bored with their duties. They volunteer for other assignments making them too busy for their regular duties.
  2. Connects you with weaknesses. Just because you like to do it doesn’t always guarantee that you are good at doing it. Many people like to sing in the shower or at the karaoke bar. That doesn’t mean they should quit their day job. In the workplace people connect you with your work. If your work isn’t the best, what people might see is incompetence.
  3. Working twice as hard. You might have to work twice as hard or twice as long as someone with the natural talent or skills to do the same work. Certainly if it is an interest for you and you’re willing to work hard at it, you might be able to achieve success. Just make sure you’re making the most of your natural (or developed) talents and abilities.
  4. Defensive positions. I can’t even begin to express how harmful it might be to take on work or assignments just because you want to block someone else from doing it. This is competition gone too far. Sometimes people will volunteer for roles or tasks simply because they don’t want someone else to have an opportunity to shine. Terrible.
  5. Poor response times. Communication challenges might be the root cause of nearly every workplace problem or issue. It is also responsible for a lot of missed opportunities, mistakes, and poor customer service. When you’re over-committed you’re likely coming up short on call backs, email, and follow through. It’s probably also hurting your professional relationships.

Do Great Things

Caring about your career is excellent. Striving to do a great job is excellent. Offering to help or get involved for the greater good of the organization, excellent.

Being over-committed for any reason might be one of the biggest blind spots impacting your career success.

It doesn’t make you look good, it makes you look bad.

Your biggest struggle might be finding the right balance without crossing any lines.

Have you ever felt over-committed? Could it be a blind spot that is hurting your career?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Is It Worth The Risk?

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Talk is easy. There are a lot of people and organizations that talk about change, but change requires risk. Do you believe change is worth the risk?

Have a look

Many people operate in their safety zone. They never get too close to the edge, color outside of the lines, or risk something that they feel they might later regret.

Perhaps one of the most interesting things about change is that by its very nature it requires risk. Staying the same feels comfortable, largely because you believe you already know the outcome, but outcomes change too.

People and businesses often believe that they want change, that they need different outcomes. They want something that works better, lasts longer, or is more efficient. All of those are noble thoughts and those who turn thoughts into action believe that they are ready for change.

Might the question then become, “How bad do you want it?” or for others perhaps, “How bad do you need it?”

Being worth the risk is often measured after the fact. It is measured in success or failure and is seldom measured for the performance against risk. Should it be?

  • A business might run one advertisement, on one television network for one month, or they might spring for a 30 second spot during the Super Bowl.
  • An employee might speak up adding one suggestion to solving a problem in a staff meeting, or they might spend additional hours at the office developing a corrective plan of action and then present their idea to the Board of Directors.

We’re often taught or reinforced with the concept of taking a risk which results in success is good, but a risk and then failure is bad. The trouble with this mind-set is that makes people risk adverse.

It makes them risk adverse since they often feel they can’t be wrong if they stay within the safety zone. Their confidence is higher for actions which occur within the zone.

Do you believe that change is happening all around you? Do you believe that change is happening every day? Do you believe that some of this change might be considered good, and that some of it might be considered bad?

If you agree that it surrounds you, then you can probably also agree that problems change too, and that changing problems require different solutions, and that new or different solutions require taking additional risk.

If you agree with all of that, then you might also agree that the value of risk should not be expressed as good or bad, it should be expressed as progress. Largely because a risk that results in change is progress.

It’s always progress as long as you are moving forward with your successes and learning from but not repeating failures.

Is progress worth the risk?

Some believe it is, do you?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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