Tag Archives: pivot

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people resist change

How to Manage People Who Resist Change

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Change is happening all around us. Despite any opposition, despite feelings and emotions change is happening. In the workplace, how do you manage the people who resist change?

Announce the new marketing plan, a strategic direction, or personnel changes, and people will disagree. It isn’t the exception, it is what is common.

Listen and Learn

The people who resist change can tell us a lot. First, they self-identify, which is a management bonus right up front. Second, we have to listen carefully. They may have some good points. When properly managed, they can actually help strengthen the change.

What often happens is that those responsible to manage or those responsible to engage with the naysayers attempt to smooth over the change, make everyone happy, and find some neutral ground, compromise.

Will Compromise Work

Compromise seems logical. It feels like the right thing to do. Until no matter how hard or how much you bend, shape, and twist the change there always seems to be another argument about why it isn’t the right direction.

Of course, there is always the possibility that they are correct. Maybe it is a bad move. Perhaps, but when you work around the naysayers long enough you may discover that it is the same people regardless of the change.

It is a pattern. Goals aren’t being achieved, problems are occurring, measurements are accurate but the indications are clear that something needs to change. Still, the naysayers find a reason to resist. Management tries to find a way to appease.

People Who Resist Change

So how can you make everyone happy? It could be that what really makes the naysayers happy is to express that they aren’t happy. They want a voice. They want to be heard. Objections and criticism give them a platform.

The dynamics of any change are situational and circumstantial. However, sometimes the best way to make the naysayers happy is to give them their platform and keep moving forward.

Certainly, it is a delicate balance of knowing, understanding, and making good decisions when you are responsible for the outcomes. Listen carefully and learn, sometimes though you just need to keep moving.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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your change stick

Can You Make Your Change Stick?

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We sometimes over estimate what can be accomplished short term, but underestimate what our daily effort will produce across time. People who want to change their life or career often make this mistake. It might be important to have the correct frame for making your change stick.

Technology has made many things faster. We can travel faster, communicate faster, and even get our food faster.

Expectations and Frame

Have you ever watched a plant grow, what about a tree? It might be hard to notice the changes each second, every minute, or during an entire day. Across time, there is significant change.

Our reference of time might have a lot to do with our progress and making your change stick. Persistence is important and although it might be hard to measure the result from day-to-day or even month-to-month, there might be positive change.

How we frame, what we see and feel, will have consequences on what we accomplish. Our expectations might be different, our motivation might change, and our habits for success might be more tenacious.

It might be hard to see the growth sometimes but that growth has much to do with our frame. Our frame has much to do with our expectations.

We shouldn’t judge the speed of McDonalds with the speed of a gourmet meal. The expectations should be quite different.

Just because we don’t see a tree growing each day doesn’t mean it isn’t happening. Across time there is significant change.

The same thing might be true for your personal changes or for your career. It might be hard to notice each day, but across time, there is big change.

What if your career lasted only 180 days, or what if it lasted 16,425? What you accomplish in 3,000 days will be different from what you accomplish in 30.

Making Your Change Stick

Yes, it might be about patience, and patience is important, but it is really about your motivation and tenacity.

What is your frame? How do you view your change? What are the expectations?

Too many people use the wrong frame. They expect the tree to bear fruit the first season.

Have the right expectations, be careful how you frame.

Make your change stick.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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join the club appreciative strategies

Should You Join The Club, Any Club?

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Technology has rapidly expanded everyone’s opportunities to learn. It has also expanded opportunities to teach. What is stopping you? Do you want to join the club?

So Many Clubs

On social media platforms alone, there are nearly unlimited opportunities to join groups or open chats. Traditionally, in our communities and around the world there are opportunities to join trade associations and likeminded professionals in nearly every discipline.

Have you joined? What have you found?

Some join because they want to learn. Upon arrival, they determine (or believe) that the group has nothing to offer them. They might believe that they are above the crowd and there is nothing for them to learn. So then, why not teach?

The opposite might also be true. They join the group, or they think about joining the group. Upon exploration, they believe the group is too advanced, they’re not ready, and they retreat. Why not jump in and learn?

Instead, in either case people often avoid the join. What do they learn, not much, either way, right?

Proponents of Change

I am always amazed at the people who claim to be proponents of change but only when change is their way. We see it in all circles of society. We see it in politics, we see it with religion, and we often see it in business.

Not joining the club probably means you are not learning. You might believe that you have maxed out, you are the absolute expert and the world revolves around your principles and philosophies.

Others, those engaged in the groups, they’re growing, changing, and shifting. They are changing the framework, moving the needle, and raising the bar. They are learning or teaching, but there is change.

Everyone else might just be hiding. They aren’t stabilized, they’re declining, declining because as the world continues on, they are standing still.

Join the Club

You have an opportunity to be part of something, to build something, grow something, or learn something.

Not joining means you’ll probably be left behind.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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done through culture appreciative strategies

Getting Things Done Through Culture

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Teamwork and teambuilding were once popular words and so were TQM (Total Quality Management) and TIM (Total Improvement Management). Some of the names may have changed but many organizations continue the search for getting things done through culture.

Organizations want to have a dynamic, engaging, and productive culture. Sometimes however, the cultural norms lead to their own destruction.

People

Cultures have symbols, espoused values, and even their own language. Everyone knows what they are and most abide by the rules of the game.

Workplace culture might be one of the most powerful tools of the organization. It might be considered full of peer pressure, pride, and for many thriving within it, motivation. Workplace culture might also be the catalyst for change. Exist within it, follow or you’re out.

Most workplace cultures aren’t about fear though. In fact, they’re probably about the opposite. They hold the comfort and energy that keeps things going. It is what everyone believes in and how they keep the faith during the toughest times. It is people getting things done through culture.

History

Cultures branch out, they change, they grow and move along. Some cultures succeed while others might fail.

History tells of Khufu, Tutankhamen, and Ramesses the Great in Egyptian history. We also know of Easter Island and the Mayan civilization.

In American management, we might recognize names like Henry Ford, Peter Drucker, or Jack Welch.

Pyramids, cars, or other outputs they all got things done through people. Your workplace culture might be the only way to pivot, create lasting positive change, or during challenging times stop the bleeding.

Done Through Culture

It might not matter what you call it or even who the legacy belongs to. I don’t see anything great happening without culture.

Getting anything done, or nothing, probably has something to do with the people, the people who form the culture.

The best question though might not be about who. It might be about why.

What is your pyramid?

Why will it get built?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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comfortable with change

Getting Comfortable With Change

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Did your January 1st start out with a vow to change something? As I write this, it is nearing the end of June. How has change worked for you? Are you comfortable with change?

Habits and Traditions

Most of our life is spent getting comfortable. It seems we are always working to improve our skill and to replicate what worked well and call it a habit. It might be the way that we do things and those things might become known as traditions.

Yet, for most of us, we also recognize that if we want different results we have to do things differently. Even then, we sometimes can’t just do things differently, we must consider how to do different things. This is change.

When our concept of progress is to become so highly skilled that we feel comfortable, everything else is uncomfortable. Change is often hard, it is different, not the same. Change might take all that we know and all that we’ve done and turn it upside down and inside out.

Business leaders want to improve the product, find new revenue streams, or completely change the company. Their opposition might not be the competition but more about the habits and traditions they’ve worked so hard to perfect. It is a paradox.

Comfortable with Change

Perhaps mastering change is to learn a new skill, the skill of becoming comfortable with the uncomfortable.

The emergency room at the local hospital never knows what to expect. They plan for the unplanned and adapt as things change. Certainly, they might not always change their policies, procedures, or medicine, but they also don’t know what will happen next.

Technology, shifts in socio-economic conditions, and the values and beliefs of consumers will all have an impact on what happens next.

It seems that the best way to get comfortable with change is to expect it.

You’re going to have to give something up though. A habit, a tradition, or the way you’ve always done it. It will mean learning something different and developing a new skill.

Get comfortable with that too.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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change readiness appreciative strategies inquiry

Change Readiness, Are You Prepared For Change?

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Ask around, you can find many people who will tell you that they want change. Asking about the desire for change might not be the best question though. You might want to ask them about change readiness.

I often speak to groups about change. I’ve encouraged people to think differently about change in my book, Pivot and Accelerate. It’s common that when I ask people if they want to change or if they are committed to change, they tell me that they are.

It’s interesting though because when it comes to giving up something to replace it with something else they are often not so eager to let go. Perhaps it should be more like an episode of Tiny House Nation, where people are forced to let go of things they might not need.

People who believe that they are interested in changing their future need to discover what they will let go, after all, they want their future to be different, right?

Change Readiness

While there are many things to consider about change here are three important things to think about:

  1. Path of least resistance. This path or something close to it might be what we are naturally drawn towards. There is a good chance that this path won’t produce the kind of change you truly seek.
  2. Test of time. People often cite the test of time. “We’ve always done it this way.” is commonplace when discussions of change pop up. The test of time has relevance, but when you want different results, the test of time might be exactly what is holding you back.
  3. More than one method. A specific course of action is good. It might mean your strategy has focus. Remember though that there is often more than one-way. Insisting on a specific method might limit the potential for a necessary breakthrough.

Fear of Failure

The next time someone brings up the fear of failure, remind them that they really might be more afraid of success.

If you’re serious about discovering more success and you’re willing to give up something to make that happen. Things are about to change.

Are you ready?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Productivity Habits – The Tools, Addictions, and Information Overload

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Many people believe that they must find ways to accomplish more in the same amount of time. Some blame too much information and too many distractions. Could it all be related to productivity habits?

productivity habits appreciative strategies

Tools

When you stop to think about all of the tools available today in the office arsenal it seems counterintuitive to believe that we have any productivity concerns.

Of course the expectations might be different today. Stamping out word representations in a clay tablet certainly would be time consuming, so would chiseling a hieroglyph in a rock. Clearly we’ve improved.

The Microsoft Office Suite alone is probably responsible for a lot more productivity. It also might be responsible for more data, some of it fresh, some of it borrowed and duplicated. Do we really have a productivity issue? Do we suffer from information overload or is it more about being distracted?

There is a pretty good chance that our habits are involved. Some suggest it might be addictions.

Addictions

Can you put down your smart phone during a meal?

Do you check your messages and alerts as soon as you open your eyes in the morning? Do you feel a sense of panic when you are without your phone? If yes, you might have an addiction.

Information is powerful, and the quest for the latest news, the most recent information, the gossip, the drama, and the presidential tweet. It all might be an addiction, or just really bad habits.

Productivity Habits

As a professional business consultant and coach I would suggest that change is within you. If you are hungry for a change, you’ll be more likely to stick with a plan or appropriately pivot to something better. Your habits will have a lot to do with your success.

Habits, procrastination, and decisions all impact your productivity. It might not be so much about information overload blocking progress. It probably isn’t a lack of quality tools, or the speed of your download.

Being addicted to distractions might be a problem.

Most of all, you just might have to get out of your own way.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Confidence and Knowing What Matters

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How do you know what really matters? Do you know for certain, or is it unclear? Do you have enough confidence?

confidence

For clarity, I’m not asking these questions so much about life’s needs, but more about personal or professional goals, creating success in your career, or perhaps about success in your business or the organization you work for.

People often suggest that things like family, friends, and our health matter most. It’s true, those things are very important and they certainly matter, but beyond those what is important?

Recently I wrote about knowing or understanding, “When Change Makes Sense.” One of the driving points in that writing was, knowing what matters.

A friend asked me, “How do we really know what matters?”

Perhaps what matters the most, at least in this context, is achieving your goal or getting to that desired end result.

I believe too many people lose sight of the goal and focus on a bunch of meaningless (meaningless in value to the big picture) activities, or ineffective and dead end pursuits because it is trendy or proclaimed and advertised as working for someone else.

In other cases people might change for just the sake of change. Sometimes that might be a bit motivational, a way to reduce monotony and lift spirits, but in other cases when someone signals change people become more afraid instead of motivated. They then often become uncertain of what matters and progress slows or stops altogether.

Certainly, much of this depends on the environment, the context, and the perceived need for change or accomplishment.

Misdirected Intentions

The first belief that people often develop when they aren’t achieving a goal is that they are doing something wrong. They often don’t consider that their path might be okay, and that it will just take a little more time. Instead they want to follow some propaganda about fast results and quick fixes.

They see the snake oil, and they buy it, they buy all of it.

Worse Yet

The bigger problem might be, once they start second guessing or they convince themselves that their approach isn’t working they begin to develop a lack of confidence necessary to pull them closer to the goal.

They still might be able to push, but they are no longer being pulled. People can push, and often push really hard, but it is the pull that really gets you through the most challenging times.

With a lack of confidence people often fail to make it through the ups and downs, the ups aren’t readily recognized and the downs become, “I told you so,” or “I knew it,” moments. None of this is reflective of a focus on what really matters. It is a focus on failure and the prescribed method for turning around a failure is often more change.

What Matters

Sometimes change isn’t what is needed at all. At least not large scale change, often it is more of a pivot, or slight redirection of effort to get around the roadblock, leap the hurdle, and get closer to what really matters.

Unfortunately, when your focus becomes about weaknesses and failures most people will look for someone else’s method to bail them out. A different and winning method, one with proven results and a quick fix, after all, you’re told this is what’s missing and what will always work.

Yes, this is sometimes valid, and yes it is sometimes representative of how we learn and grow, but too often it becomes an excuse to change everything and pick a completely new path. When the new path doesn’t work then there is still someone else to blame.

Instead of focusing on failed attempts, instead of blowing your confidence, instead of following someone else’s rule for change try sticking to your vision of the goal, and focus on what truly matters.

What matters? It’s not comparisons to someone else’s results. It is not the snake oil that was purchased or the quick fix. What sometimes matters the most is getting progressively closer to your end result.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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  • 5

Change, Does It Always Make Sense?

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Many insist that change is critical, urgent, and the recipe for success. Does change always make sense? Is now the time for a change?

change makes sense

When I go to my favorite restaurant I order the same thing, almost every time. In my local town I go to the same gas station, time after time. How do I like my coffee? I like it black, no cream, no sugar, every time.

I haven’t worn a white or light colored business suit since the 1980’s (thank you Don Johnson and Miami Vice), and I have at least twenty white dress shirts but only three or four of different colors.

I may not be the same as everyone else, and that doesn’t mean that any of us should change, but it also probably doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t.

When does change or doing something different really make sense?

Despite my rhetoric about how much I like what I like and I stick to it, I’m a big proponent of change. Change might not always be the answer though, likely more often than people realize it is more about persistence, tenacity, and keeping our sleeves rolled up while appropriately staying the course.

People and organizations can get stuck, but being stuck doesn’t mean that the goal should change. Perhaps it is more about a pivot to a better path.

Technology, it’s changing the world around us and we’ll need to adapt or get left behind. Marketing and advertising, they are affected by technology and we’ll need to adjust to maximize our opportunities. How we communicate, that’s changing too, all of this while arguments continue on the best methods or paths.

Perhaps none of that means that the plan should be destroyed, the culture turned inside out, or the mission statement revised. It might sometimes, but not always. Just because change feels trendy doesn’t mean it is a good idea.

Change makes the most sense when we know what really matters, what draws us closer to the goal, and what prevents us from being stuck, stalled, or starving for more opportunities.

Most businesses and people aren’t overnight success stories. They often appear to be because we’ve noticed them on the move, in the climb, or nearing one of their many peaks.

Even by today’s standards and the speed of technology there are very few overnight success stories.

Sure a video will go viral, a tweet might start trending, and a song might hit the top ten. All of which happens very fast, but the people and the culture of the pursuit have likely been around for years.

Even Johnny Cash had to persist in his attempts, although at the time he was likely recognized as an overnight sensation.

When it comes to your personal or professional goals, building a brand, or discovering what’s most important about your culture, it all takes time.

Change makes sense when all other avenues have been exhausted, when it is stimulating or exciting but keeps things on track, or when technological advances will shorten or enhance the journey.

Everything else might be just a distraction, a way to discover our original path was still the best one of all, and to remind us that persistence and tenacity have little or nothing to do with ease, but everything to do with doing what really matters.

When you are doing what really matters, you might not have to change a thing.

Today I’ll wear a dark colored suit with a white shirt, I’ll eat several meals of my favorite foods, drink my coffee black, and fill up my car at the local gas station.

Changing any of that, or none of it, doesn’t change what matters.

Sometimes we just need to stay the course.

It might make the most sense, at least for now.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Can Your Organization Change?

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Organizations often express a strong desire for change, but what that really means is that they want others to change. Can your organization and its people transform?

organization change appreciative inquiry

A friend invites another friend to join the exercise program.

A doctor tells a patient to take the medicine.

A business owner expresses that the team should gain additional skills.

No desire, no change. No action, no change. No new habits, a new tradition, or development of a new cultural method, and nothing changes.

External forces can drive change. Economic conditions, government regulations, and technological advances are all great examples.

Internal forces typically only create lasting change when it is required by external forces or it is desirable internally. Then those actions or behaviors become a habit, a tradition, or a method of operation that employee teams might suggest as, “The way things are done.”

So for organizational transformation the development of skills only represents part of the challenge. The other part might exist somewhere in the creation of desire.

If you want to create the desire that will transform your organization and its people here are a few things to consider.

  • Connect ideas to outcomes. Talking about change doesn’t always illustrate it. Connecting the dots for everyone and having a clear picture of the outcomes and associated benefits will help create the desire to endure the requirements for change.
  • Create paths for growth. People are part of the system. The system will need the opportunity for individual growth. You might know what’s in it for the organization, but what’s in it for the individual people? Prove it.
  • Reward performance not compliance. Teams can become stale, stalled, and stuck. Often this develops because the reinforcement is for following the rules not for executing with high performance. When you make the focus on performance you’ll get more.

Scaring people into change might work, but it is never recommended. Fear can have a significant impact on performance, but motivation through fear typically creates an “us against them” culture. That’s not inspirational or desirable and some might even suggest that it is bullying.

Organizations and the people within its systems can invite, tell, or express a desire for change, but it’s only going to happen when the individuals who are part of those systems develop both the skills and the desire, and then continue to replicate them across time. The most success will occur when everyone is bought-in.

Many organizations talk about change.

Your organization can change, but will it?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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