Tag Archives: money

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caring costs

Caring Costs but Saves Money in the Long Run

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Possibly the most fundamental principle that is so often violated in the workplace and especially in customer service is caring. Caring costs but it certainly can save money in the long run.

Workplace Caring

At our job, someone leaves the printer without paper, or prints and leaves the tray filled with unwanted output. The office microwave has spills, the paper towel dispenser is empty, and all of your shared documents have moved to a different folder.

It seems doesn’t matter [sarcasm] because time is money and everyone is running late or behind, or perhaps, they just don’t care. We’ll leave it for the next person to clean up or take care of, after all, they have more time.

Customer Service

We see it, feel it, and hear about it all the time. The unclean restroom, food that should be warm, but is cold, or even the displays that clutter the isles of our local food store making it difficult for shopping carts to pass.

Caring may feel like it is expensive. It takes time, resources, and often money to make a difference.

Too often, the focus is on the short term, not realizing the negative repercussions in the long run.

Caring Costs

One of the best benefits of caring is word of mouth, today this is world of mouth. The C Suite fears the negative social media posts, but insists that organizational performance is relative to the front line.

Caring starts internally, it begins within the culture of the organization. It is hard to show external caring when internally the measurement of profit or sales trumps any philosophical position the organization claims to be taking.

Saves Money

Yes, in fact, caring costs, but it may also more than pay for itself. Caring builds relationships, creates loyalty, and increases lifetime customer value. Considering just those three things, it seems to me that in the long run this saves money.

Is caring important? Caring is so important that I devoted a chapter to it in my recent book.

Care more. It puts the human back in the equation—priceless.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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born leaders appreciative strategies

Some People Are Born Leaders, Right?

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A discussion exists that has been circling for some time. It didn’t start yesterday, and it may not end today. Are some people born leaders? Are leaders automatically born into leadership or are they made?

In U.S. culture the answers are much like an election, you’ll find people on both sides.

Leadership is for the:

  • wealthy who have things coming their way, it may be people like Richard Branson, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett;
  • generous, it may be people like Paul Allen, George Soros, and Ted Turner;
  • long lasting and persistent, people like Peter Drucker, Jack Welch, and Fred Smith.

Is it?

Beliefs about Leadership

Some believe that leadership is for everyone else. It is for other people, the people who have rank, money, and family connections.

There are people with a different belief about leadership. People with a different story, a different foundation, and even with a different frame. They see things differently.

Leadership is Different

When you see it that everyone has a chance to lead, and people will lead in different ways and at different capacities, leadership itself is about something different.

If you make your life’s work about developing the knowledge, skills, and abilities to lead and then you execute to the fullest extent of your capabilities you are probably a leader.

Leadership doesn’t come from status, money, or family connections. It isn’t a job title, a number of direct reports, or high back leather chair. It isn’t a salary, perks, or a membership at the country club.

Born Leaders

Leadership may come from caring, giving, and role modeling. It may come from well executed risk, persistence, and by making good choices. It may also be about stepping up, endurance, and taking initiative.

If you decide you want to lead, then perhaps you can decide that you were born to lead.

Leadership for anyone is about one fundamental truth—choice.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Leadership Habit 32: Motivate with Rewards

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Some believe motivation is entirely intrinsic, no outside stimulus will change a person’s desire to perform. Others believe motivation has extrinsic factors and you just might be able to inspire action. Can you motivate with rewards?

motivate with rewards

The truth about motivation is that many things impact a person’s drive or desire to accomplish something. Workplace leaders are often interested in motivation because they see it as a way to increase team effectiveness, improve productivity, and ultimately impact the bottom line.

Some of the poorest choices for motivation are to motivate through fear or by giving an ultimatum. Inspiration is always a better choice.

Rewards might provide some of the backdrop for inspiration. Most of us are taught at a very young age that when we do something desirable for someone else we might get a reward. Perhaps we’re all working for the reward.

Motivate with Rewards

Here are a few examples of rewards:

  • Money. First on the list for many, especially when we are considering job performance, is money. Yes, money is often considered a form of reward largely because it gives people the freedom to choose their ultimate reward.
  • Trophy. You get a plaque on the wall for high achievement, employee of the month, and for being the best seller. This might also include ribbons, certificates of appreciation, and honorable mentions.
  • Position. Advancement for your career might be very valuable. When there is recognized opportunity and proof (others have been promoted) employees might work very hard, be very committed, and loyal. Usually there is another incentive, money.
  • Legacy. Some might be motivated by legacy. They are inspired by the narrative of the contributions of others. This is the picture on the wall, the hall of fame, or the reason for an entire product line or service.
  • Appreciation. Many employees will work hard for a cause or hard for something that creates impact. Impact is when their contribution is recognized (honored, celebrated) and it changes or fixes something important to them.

Most businesses are focused on bringing in the best people, keeping the best team, and accomplishing everything through the reward of a paycheck and benefits. Absolutely these are important, but there might be more to the story.

The Right Performance

The reward might not always be obvious and there is another side to rewards.

A child seeking attention might continue with an undesirable behavior because you’ll pay attention and spring into action. It’s often not much different in the grown-up world.

Give the team lots of rewards. Just be careful of the performance that you are rewarding.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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3 Myths That Drive Millennials Crazy

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Millennials aren’t alone; misunderstandings, disagreements, and stereotyping are problematic for nearly every workforce generation. Unfortunately the millennials seem to be the target of more bad press when compared with traditionals, boomers, gen x’ers, and even the emerging generation 9/11 population.

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My workplace discussions with most millennials, including those that I’ve coached, have some common themes or myths that quite frankly, drive millennials crazy.

Here are three that make the list:

  1. Expect Different Treatment. Traditionals, boomers, and generation x all seem to believe that millennials expect to be treated differently. What all workplace generations have in common is that they all want respect. Millennials don’t believe it is about different treatment but it is about the commonality of respect.
  2. Not Loyal. Loyalty is a two-way street at least that is what most millennials will tell you. It seems too often that businesses prejudge millennials as being stepping stone employees; those who are only interested in using the job as a stepping stone. Lack of commitment by the organization then leads to turnover of all generations, but especially the vibrant millennial population.
  3. All About Money. Due in part to the uncertain world millennials have faced during their lifetime some are strong believers in get it while you can. The other side of the millennial population perhaps doesn’t feel as much need since some of them are still attending college, living with parents, or with small groups of friends. In other cases, even those who have left the nest may have portions of their expenses still being paid by their parents. Much of this group is just as interested in compressed work schedules and “comp time” as they are paycheck dollars. In certain sectors they are often known to turn down overtime opportunities for more leisure time. 

Of course, all of these characteristics are not representative of every person in the millennial generation. There are many variables that should be considered. Including which end of the millennial age continuum they are on, geographic location, and rural versus urban living.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker, and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect. Reach him through his website at http://DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.


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Spending Smart

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It seems reasonable that all businesses spend money on marketing and advertising efforts. People too, they spend their energy and resources on networking, relationship building, and future positioning.

Money-PhotoCreditNickAres

Some businesses will just throw money at a problem; throw money at building their brand, or at marketing and advertising efforts. It doesn’t mean they are any smarter or better than businesses who spend less, it means that they earn enough through their endeavors or through investment to spend like crazy trying to make up for other shortcomings. Many believe the old idiom, “You’ve got to spend money, to make money.” Perhaps there is some truth to that statement.

People sometimes follow a similar pattern. Sometimes they spend with money, sometimes with only resources or their individual energy. People may pursue building relationships, monitoring who they hang out with, and even how they spend their leisure time. All in an effort to build relationships or an image that they believe will get results. Many believe the old idiom, “It’s not what you do, it’s who you know.”  Is that the truth? Perhaps but is it smart spending?

Both businesses and people spend. It’s not about how much they spend. They don’t necessarily need to spend big—they need to spend smart!

– DEG

Photo Credit: Nick Ares and aresauburnTM


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