Tag Archives: millennials

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generational shift

What Causes a Generational Shift?

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Generational differences continue to be a hot topic. It seems that nearly anything that is changing or perceived as non-mainstream thinking casts blame on the millennial generation. However, millennials are not our youngest workforce generation. What causes a generational shift?

In a general sense, the definition of each workforce generation is a soft concept. By soft, I’m indicating that it is not an exact science and popular opinions led by experts in the field shape most of the published work which defines the generations.

Generational Framework

In my opinion, and consistent with many opinions discovered through my research on the subject this is our current (2017) framework (Chart):

Traditionals: Born 1930 – 1945

Baby Boomers: Born 1946 – 1964

Generation X: Born 1965 – 1976

Millennials (Gen Y): Born 1977 – 1994

Generation Z (Gen 9/11, iGen): Born after 1994

What shapes this framework or what causes one generation to end and another to begin?

generational framework

Factors Shape Generations

Three significant factors are likely responsible for an emerging new generation.

Socio-Economic Conditions: This represents a significant shift in values, culture, and issues that impact economic conditions. One example is the Great Depression (Circa 1929-1933).

Major Technology Shifts: Represented as anytime technology drives a significant shift in activities, behaviors, or the economy. Examples could include the space race (Circa mid-1960’s), and the emergence of personal computing devices (Circa late-1970’s, early 1980’s).

Times of War: Unfortunately, a time of war also seems to impact or contribute to shifting the generational framework. Examples could include World War II, Vietnam, and the Gulf War.

generational differences

Generational Shift

Popular wisdom suggests that there may be a blending of these conditions, and if only one condition seems to exist it is unlikely that a generational shift will occur. When two or more of the conditions (factors) exist it is very likely the framework will shift.

For example, the shaping of the next generation, the one beyond Gen Z has likely started around 2007. This is true because of the period becoming known as the Great Recession (2007-2010) and the emergence of shifting technology with the introduction of the iPhone, which is often regarded as the first smartphone.

It is also worth noting that I while I consistently cite Gen Z as having a start year of around 1994; I believe it is closer to 1990. Consider the Gulf War, economic factors, and technology shifts such as those associated with NASA and the emergence of cellular telephone hardware and services.

There are opinions that generational differences are not real, that it is only representative of changing needs based upon age. However, there is strong argument from social philosophers and experts who research this subject.

Differences exists because of age as well as what we label as the generations. Generational differences are not so much about age, but they are about the values and beliefs of people who are grouped together and categorized by their birth year.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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blame millennials appreciative strategies

When All Else Fails, Blame Millennials

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The trend might be, blame millennials. It seems that every workplace problem or business decline somehow is connected with millennial behavior. Is it true?

Who They Are

One of the most important factors to consider is that not every person 35 or younger is a millennial. In fact, the oldest millennials are about to turn 40. The youngest adult population really represents generation Z (Gen 9/11, iGen, Gen Z).

Therefore, it seems that the youngest millennials and Gen Z might really be the target. Should they be? Alternatively, you might ask, do the generations that come before them lack foresight and adaptability?

Generational groupings are determined by major shifts. Technology and socio-economic conditions are definitely part of the drivers for these shifts.

Millennial and Gen Z buying habits might be different but are their mindsets? Expanding the question we should probably ask, “Different from what?”

An important factor for assessing generational differences is to consider that there are differences in age but there are also differences in values and beliefs. It is not so much age that creates the generational divide. It is a difference in values and beliefs.

What does this mean when it comes to our workforce?

Blame Millennials

Organizations often find themselves scrambling to find ways to attract and retain the younger segment of our workforce population. They offer incentives, suggest they are the best place to work, relax some policies and procedures, change work hours, and even throw out longstanding dress codes.

If none of those seem to work, they blame millennials, or sometimes the parents of millennials. Often resolving our challenges is not about who is to blame, it is more about how to make it better. You might consider how you will clean things up, change, adapt, and be interestingly different.

There is a philosophy about building relationships and making new connections. It might apply to discovering more about how to work across multiple generations. It goes something like this, “You have to be interested before you are interesting.”

Work With You

Generational differences can be challenging to navigate. They are real. Yes, there are connections to participation trophies, cell phones, and the sense of entitlement. Values and beliefs might be different but not necessarily unrealistic.

From my experiences, the majority of our youngest representations in the workforce don’t believe that they don’t have to work.

They are often just trying to decide if they should work with you.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Millennials and Gen Z Believe in Making a Difference

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If you work in a multigenerational workplace you’ve probably stumbled upon some different perspectives on life. Do millennials and gen Z (Gen 9/11, iGen) believe in making a difference?

Gen Z Believe Appreciative Strategies

Nearly everyone has heard the idea (value) of treating others the way you would like to be treated. It is a decent value to carry. It shows that you care. You typically want the best for yourself and when you deliver that to others it would certainly seem to make the world a better place.

One stumbling block for many organizational cultures today is integrating the knowledge, experience, and talent across all generations. Things often seem to lean towards one end of the generational framework or the other.

When a business or organization really wants to have a supportive culture across all generations they might need to think differently.

Multigenerational Harmony

Trust me when I say, “What I’m about to say rubs some people the wrong way.”

Businesses that have been around for a while insist that those coming on-board must adapt to their culture. After all, their culture is the preferred culture and it is how the business was built. That might be okay, if you don’t plan to hire across all generations.

If you want, or more importantly need (which most businesses do) to start onboarding those representing the two most recent generations you might have to think differently.

You might have to change your philosophy from treating others the way you would like to be treated, to treating others the way they would like to be treated.

Millennials and Gen Z Believe

In the workplace many traditionals, baby boomers, and generation X, are focused on building their professional portfolio and establishing professional recognition.

In contrast, recent studies indicate that 84 percent of the millennials believe that, “making a positive difference in the world is more important than professional recognition.”

As with all of the research related to generational differences, it is not everyone, in every sector, or every business.

Considering asking someone if they believe in making a difference. Most will say, “Yes.”

Then you’ll just need to understand what that really means.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Millennial Feedback, Do They Need Something Different?

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Most employers today recognize the need and value of feedback systems. Should millennial feedback have additional considerations?

millennial feedback

When you ask employers about feedback most will tell you that they give an annual performance review. Other smaller but growing operations might suggest that although they haven’t developed an official process, they are working towards it.

Is something different needed for the millennial (gen Y) generation?

Feedback

When we start to consider the five generations that are active in our workplace today we also might want to consider some stereotypes. In many workplaces supervisory positions are often filled with earlier generation employees. They have more years of experience and often work their way into these positions.

One stereotype is that supervisors (managers, directors, et al) representing the traditional or baby boomer generations don’t give a lot of feedback. They are often described as communicating a message of, “no news is good news.”

The position they might take can also be described as, “When there is a problem I’ll let you know.”

Millennial Feedback

What might be most important for millennials? Formal feedback systems that would include the annual or semi-annual evaluation are still good, but perhaps everyone, including millennials would benefit from something more.

Some suggest that, “80 percent of Gen-Y say they prefer on-the-spot recognition over formal reviews…” While I’m not completely sure of the research methods behind that statistical expression, my informal discussions with millennials strongly reflect this trend.

Giving and receiving feedback more frequently might help every employee. Not only does it make their work more relevant it also helps solidify engagement.

Additionally, many people feel anxiety about the formal review process. When feedback is communicated more frequently, it leaves less room for surprises and helps minimize anxiety. After all, when our anxiety levels go up, our listening skills go down.

Are you or your employee teams providing the right frequency of feedback? Have they been properly trained on the best communication methods?

Does your organization need something different?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Baby Boomer Leadership, Can You Survive It?

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Have you asked yourself how you will survive baby boomer leadership or a baby boomer culture? Regardless of which of the five workforce generations you represent, have you found yourself struggling with the mindset associated with baby boomer leadership?

Baby boomer leadership appreciative strategies

It might be important to define baby boomer leadership. What is it?

I believe it represents a style of leadership, the atmosphere of a workplace culture, and the values associated with respect that is different from emerging leadership trends.

Baby Boomer Leadership

Baby boomer leadership might be characterized in this way:

  • Leaning towards authoritarian. Perhaps not entirely, but by comparison to what many workplace professionals desire today it is much more, “do it, or die.”
  • Experience matters more than knowledge. Years of experience appear to be most important. More recent workforce generations often bring much new age knowledge, but yet are often discounted since they lack experience.
  • Respect is based on authority level. Respect is given, but mostly to those who represent a position of rank (supervisor, manager, etc.). The front line and lower ranking employees are often exempt from opinions or thought contributions.

Does any of this describe the culture at your workplace? If yes, I know why you are still reading this. The question now becomes, what can you do about it?

Surviving a Culture

Workplace or organizational culture is very unique, perhaps as unique as a fingerprint. Culture defines all that the organization is, and all that it does. Mission and vision statements are also closely connected with culture, or at least they should be.

Here are a few strategies for surviving a leadership culture that might ebb with your flow:

  1. Stay true. Remain true to who you are, being likeable is important but so is respect. Taking a position against the leadership team might end badly. Find some balance but maintain your own self-respect.
  2. Think before speaking. Impulse control might be important for you and make sure you practice it even in the most difficult situations. Learn to feel it coming and avoid doing any actions or behaviors out of impulse.
  3. Don’t expect change. Most likely nothing you do will change the culture unless the opportunity develops for your honest input. You might not change others but you can manage your reactions to the environment you are working in.
  4. Stay respectful. If your workplace culture exists around an authoritarian approach be sure to signal respect to others and especially those of higher ranks. Respect is what they expect and the better you deliver they more enjoyable your work might become.
  5. Flow. Although your temptations might be to resist or rebel, sometimes going with the flow is what will help you survive. Your current position might not be the greatest but the alternative might be much worse.

Evolving Leadership Trends

Leadership trends continue to evolve and the characteristics for best practices of modern leadership are pivoting.

There is chatter about new age thinking, such as servant leadership and other models. In many cases these are older theories or styles that are remerging with a new spin. Perhaps different from what the baby boomers grew up with and what they still role model today.

That doesn’t imply who is right or wrong, or what is good or bad. It implies that generational differences are putting pressure on current thinking and trends which might result in the desire for a different leadership approach.

Are you concerned about surviving a baby boomer leadership culture?

Sometimes going with the flow is the best advice of all.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Do You Bring Solutions to the Meeting?

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It’s the first Wednesday of the month and Andy who is an outnumbered millennial team member finds himself sitting in a monthly managers meeting. He is nervous and his anxiety levels are through the roof. His baby boomer boss Robert is about to call on him for his monthly report and Robert has little tolerance for anything short of stellar results.

Visionary employee thinking of development

This meeting has gradually become more uncomfortable for Andy, any time that he hasn’t achieved a goal or completed something to Robert’s satisfaction Robert leaves him feeling like he might be only one step away from the good bye door.

Andy is frustrated. He works hard, puts in extra time, but doesn’t always meet the high expectations of Robert. When Andy asks for advice on how to do it better or to learn more, Robert typically delivers a non-supportive and chilly response leaving him with the impression that he shouldn’t have asked.

Andy is smart and quick on his feet and that is why his peers label him a fast tracker, but still when he is called upon to perform at manager meetings there is little tolerance for shortcomings. For Andy, the environment sometimes feels like a swimming pool, sink or swim.

The Story

This story and many others like it come to me from time-to-time. Sometimes it is through a training event, a consulting engagement, or coaching session. In other cases it might represent a friend of a friend, emailing or telephoning me with a question. The point is, this is fairly common, but what should Andy do?

The Real Problem

In his mind Andy knows he could make the argument that Robert should be more patient, perhaps be more understanding, and that he should provide Andy with some possible solutions or tips for improvement. Most people might agree with Andy’s argument, but that agreement doesn’t necessarily mean it is the most tactful solution.

Breaking this situation down it would seem that Robert expects Andy to find potential solutions, jump any hurdles and through any hoops to achieve the result. Andy needs to deliver.

Look For Alternatives

Andy might feel a little intimated, after all he is one of the youngest members of the team. Not only does he want to do a good job but he also wants to be respectful. It might feel a little uncomfortable to choose a more assertive approach.

If you consider that fear might be a factor, causing Andy to hesitate, stall, or procrastinate, I should remind you that personal or professional growth sometimes requires you to step out of your comfort zone.

Andy should seek to find some possible alternatives that will lead to more successful outcomes, but he’ll also have to risk speaking up to bring them forward.

His delivery should be presented with appropriate poise and confidence but yet be humble enough to achieve the acceptance, guidance, or permission from Robert that he has been missing.

Outcomes

Employees at all levels often bring problems to a meeting, after all that might be one of the reasons for the meeting.

So what do most meetings need?

Most meetings need solutions.

Bring some.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Performance Reviews for Millennials

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Performance reviews are often one of the most important yet misunderstood development tools used in organizations today. Recently I’ve been asked some questions about the performance review process for the millennial generation.

performance reviews appreciative strategies

Should the performance review process be different for a millennial?

I believe the answer is both yes and no.

No, the general characteristics or the process should not be different. The foundation for the tools or process should remain as a standard for any employee review.

Yes, the type of interaction and perhaps the style or flow of the conversation might be more productive if it is managed a little differently.

Performance Reviews

Performance reviews should be recognized as one of the most powerful and useful tools for continuing to develop employees and the organizational culture. Unfortunately it is often misunderstood, taken for granted, and inappropriately used.

Here are several areas that show up near the top of the misunderstood and misused list:

  • an opportunity to scold or negatively blast employees
  • highlight one specific error or wrong doing
  • used to justify other issues, such as no pay raise

The performance review process should consider all efforts and should in some way be appropriately connected to a job description. It should be used as an opportunity to focus on future performance, help to establish future development goals, and to reinforce the performance that is most desirable.

If you have an employee that is struggling to achieve or maintain successful levels of contribution and organizational performance then you probably should consider a performance improvement plan (PIP) instead of using an annual or semi-annual performance review process. Certainly, there can be some overlap with the uses of these tools, but the general approaches should be different.

Millennial Considerations

As I’ve already mentioned the foundation of the process should not be different for a millennial employee but taking into consideration a few common characteristics might be helpful. Generational differences are not so much about age as they are about values and beliefs and many millennials struggle with a traditional or boomer boss in a number of areas.

Here are a few common areas of struggle that the millennial employee might feel.

  1. Unheard or not listened to. Perhaps this happens when millennials share an idea but then fail to see any implementation or what they perceive as consideration for their idea.
  2. Not well respected. There is a difference between not respected and disrespected. Often the millennial employee interacting with a boomer boss feels that the boss lacks appropriate respect for the millennial.
  3. Different about solving problems. Traditionals and boomers typically view problem solving as requiring effort and a plan while millennials almost always seek to improve the situation through a technology solution.

Frequency

Different values and beliefs brought about in-part because of societal changes could mean that many millennials are seeking more frequent feedback on performance.

A formal review process is typically annual or semi-annual and any employee on a specific PIP would receive feedback more frequently. Informally, more frequent feedback exchanges are often welcomed by millennial or gen Z (Gen 9/11, iGen) employees.

The stereotype is that traditionals and baby boomers are willing to view a day on the job as, no news is good news, whereas the youngest representation in our workforce today needs feedback for encouragement, motivation, and to help keep anxiety levels low.

Millennial Reviews

Should performance reviews be different for millennials?

Every performance review approach, style, and delivery should have some variances.

Some common mistakes made by supervisors are that they themselves don’t take the feedback process serious enough.

Supervisors often feel unprepared or challenged by any conflict that might arise, and then they often deliver based on how they themselves would feel most comfortable and achieve the most benefit, when in fact, the best performance review should be delivered with considerations for how the recipient would benefit the most.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Does My Baby Boomer Boss Respect Me?

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Generational differences, that is how most people label challenges associated with communication and working with others who have a significant difference in birth year from their own. Do you have a baby boomer boss that respects you?

baby boomer boss

Occasionally you might hear the words generational respect, but we very seldom hear words or phrases connected with the idea of generational commonalities. Discussion points, debates, or arguments typically open with the concept of differences.

If we think just for a minute about commonalities, one of the biggest things that all generations have in common is that they all want respect.

When we consider the idea of respect spread across all levels of authority or the organizational ladder it is something that most employees are interested to ensure exists. Respect in the workplace can certainly exist across any level or hierarchy and can sometimes be increasingly sensitive when working across multiple generations.

Many workplaces today have traditionals or baby boomers that might report to a gen X or millennial boss, but often it is more common that the more recent generations including gen Z (Gen 9/11, iGen) have a boss who is a baby boomer. So it might beg the question, does my baby boomer boss respect me?

Are You Respected?

Let’s consider a few areas that indicate respect.

  • Listens well. Communication skills, especially listening are an important part of workplace harmony. We can probably attribute many of our workplace challenges, performance problems, or productivity issues to ineffective communication. If the conversations between you and your boss are well grounded in good listening skills or techniques, then you have a good foundation for mutual respect.
  • Asks meaningful questions. In the workplace people are typically driving towards results. Critical thinking, solving problems, and especially asking questions not only produce a wider array of information but also contribute to focus. When co-workers are asking questions of their peer team or supervisors they most likely respect their opinion. The same is true from boss to direct report. Of course the type of question is also important, interrogation techniques do not apply here.
  • Makes time. When you stop to think about it, everything in life revolves around time. If we lived forever nothing would really matter because there would always be more time. Being considerate and taking the time to engage with other people might be one of the biggest signs that you are valued and respected. A boss who has no time for direct reports probably could improve their boss to direct report relationships significantly by making an investment in each other’s time.

Baby Boomer Boss

When we broadly consider the distribution of generations in today’s workforce and we consider those who represent any level of supervisor, baby boomers (who are supervisors) have a significant representation.

So what do you think, does your baby boomer boss respect you?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Why Boomer CEO’s Are In A Hurry

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In business everything is moving very fast, but for the C-Level baby boomer it probably isn’t fast enough. Is the baby boomer CEO really in a hurry?

senior business man with his team at office

Business leaders always need to face the reality of external pressure. Economic conditions, in some cases government regulations, and most certainly changes in technology are all putting pressure on organizational performance.

All C-Level executives have concerns about the value of time. The CFO eats, breathes, and sleeps with thoughts about the TMV, and those responsible for operations and sales are trying to get 90 seconds out of every minute.

As they develop strategy and create strategic plans they are always connecting the amount of time with resource requirements.

You get it. Most business owners and C-Level executives face this reality every day, it’s certainly nothing new.

Have you ever considered what drives the vision for a millennial leader as compared with that of a baby boomer?

Sure both recognize the need for performance and that there is an element of time associated with that performance, but is there a difference in their perception of urgency? Absolutely and here are a few reasons why.

  • Perception of time. Ask a 30 year old executive what is personally most important for their career in the next 5 to 10 years, and then ask a 55 year old executive the same question. You might be, but shouldn’t be, surprised with the differences in their response.
  • Values and beliefs. Generational differences are real. The life experiences, values, and belief systems are shaped differently for earlier generations as compared with the most recent. Many factors contribute to shaping these differences but there are notable differences, and they are not just about age.
  • Visions of legacy. While legacy seems like a big bold word, the characteristics of what it means are prevalent in the mind of the traditional or boomer C-Level executive. In contrast, the personal goals and objectives for a millennial are often not based on any connection with legacy. They don’t see a finish line, just a lot of space to accomplish more.

So why are boomer CEO’s in more of a hurry?

You can make the argument that all C-Level executives have an impressive resume. However, for the millennial executive the book of accomplishments (metaphorically) is still in the early chapters, with the end unknown and not in sight. There is still time.

On the other hand the boomer C-Level executive will likely have enough content to fill their book, but at this stage they are really most concerned about bringing together the last couple of chapters. As they see it, their window of opportunity is closing.

Most important of all, the boomer executive wants their book to be a best seller.

– DEG

Are you hungry for additional C-Level resources? The C-Suite Network has something for you.

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Millennials and the Work / Life Blend

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Many of the traditionals, baby boomers, and generation X population are familiar with the idea of work / life balance. It has been the topic of many books, self-help guides, and even a buzz phrase for corporate culture, unfortunately that was during the 1990’s, and perhaps into the early 2000’s.

Planning work

What is the work / life blend and how is it different from work / life balance?

Work / Life Blend

Millennials and gen Z (Gen 9/11, iGen) are much more interested in the work / life blend. This style of corporate culture suggests that your work is much more integrated with your life as compared to the concept that work and life are two very different aspects.

Starting in the late 1980’s some management styles began to measure performance based on the number of hours you put into your job on a daily or weekly basis. The bragging rights or social proof of performance was demonstrated by stating the number of hours worked as compared to productivity, efficiency, or outcomes. Even today you might find pockets of what I will call old school management philosophy that attempts to correlate a person’s value to the organization by the number of hours spent on the job.

Over the course of a few decades the medical (and psychiatric) communities began to suggest that many people needed more work / life balance. The millennials and gen Z population observed much of this trend through their parent’s steadfast commitment to work and building a better life only to still be working towards those same goals today, and so they have decided that there must be a better way.

The better way, or so it is believed, is more work / life blending.

Work and Lifestyle

Regardless of the generation, this concept doesn’t work for every occupation or for every person, nor should it. However, many employers can and probably should consider incorporating a culture related more towards a work / life blend. Especially those who insist they want millennial and gen Z representation but cannot understand why they experience so much employee turnover within these generations.

Examples of moving more towards a work / life blend might include the ability and permission to:

  • have more flexible hours, recognizing that some of your work occurs outside of the workplace
  • encourage processing email and interacting electronically after traditional hours
  • connect performance measurement to results, not “clock” hours
  • incorporate marketing and branding efforts with social “off the clock” activities
  • have open workspaces with less confinement and more team centric objectives

The concept centers on the idea that work is mixed in with lifestyle.

Messengers Message

If you are a traditional or baby boomer manager who glances at this concept and just as quickly dismisses it, may I suggest that you pause? There certainly are challenges here and it might seem impossible in manufacturing, retail, and healthcare (just naming a few), but to the extent possible this concept should be explored. Early adopters in some sectors are testing combinations of fixed (traditional) hours and flex hours (read flex as blending) in an attempt to stimulate cultural change.

Avoid thinking of this concept as functioning like a light switch, with full on or full off.

Most workplace cultures will benefit the most from strategically working towards this concept and should not try a drastic move from one extreme to the other. At the same time it is important to consider that successfully onboarding and retaining the future generation of workers might depend on how soon you begin to develop and value job roles and duties that incorporate more of a work / life blend.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and coach that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is the author of the newly released book, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at DennisEGilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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