Tag Archives: growth

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Performance affects your career

How Performance Affects Your Career

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Students and professionals alike are often thinking about the future of their career. Our focus often becomes about changing, learning, and growing. All of this is good stuff but is it really how performance affects your career?

Many people buy the book, they watch the video, and they pursue additional education. Certainly, those are worthwhile investments.

Short-term Events

Unfortunately, many of those same people will attempt to position what happens next based on a short-term event. Get the new job, achieve a promotion, and insist on the higher salary. All good ideas, but they are events.

Some change may occur the moment you decide you’re going to make it happen, but getting there is usually a long-term process.

Presenting Problems

Recently, a client telephoned me with an expressed need. In my line of work, we often call this the presenting problem. The presenting problem was what they viewed as a technical issue. They were seeking some technical training but expressed they couldn’t find any training programs that fit.

In reality, the technical skills were present, the workplace habits and culture was the root of the problem. We all know that a problem fixed, that isn’t at the root, is a problem that will reoccur.

Presenting problems and the real problem are not always the same. What they wanted, as commanded by the CEO, was a technical fix. What they really needed was a program related to their technical need but one that reinforces changing their habits and organizational culture.

Perhaps most important is that this organization was looking for an event that would solve their problem.

Change Process

Events may single handedly inspire change. It may create the moment that you decide. Events typically don’t yield systemic change. An event may spark it, but long-term effort is what will create it.

This is true for organizational development. It is also true for individual career growth.

Performance Affects Your Career

Change is a process that includes persistence, tenacity, and consistent effort. It is not just a one-time occurrence, or single event, but a long-term process.

Performance affects your career, but for growth, it will take more than a single event or learning a technical skill. It will be what you develop across time. It is a process of habits consistently repeated.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Fear become habit appreciative Strategies

Can Fear Become a Habit, Should It?

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Workplace motivation is stimulated by many factors. Leaders in the workplace are striving for good habits that have positive reinforcement so that success is achieved. Fear is an emotional response and is often an inappropriate motivator. Can fear become an inappropriate habit?

Fear is powerful. There really shouldn’t be much confusion about that. We see fear in action as a motivator all the time.

A storm is coming, better get to the store.

Get the flu shot; you don’t want to get sick.

I’ve heard sales are down, make sure you look busy.

All three of these examples may have relevance and the intended action may even be a good idea, but what is the motivator? Yes, exactly, it is fear.

Facing the Truth

Sometimes facing the truth can be fearful, but often fear will cause action. It is an emotional choice. We may confuse it with a business only (no emotion) decision, but it is still about fear.

Fear isn’t always a bad motivator. Sometimes we have to face our fears in order to achieve more. When we risk little or nothing about the same amount of growth will occur, little or none. Risk involves fear.

Fear and Growth

Admitting the risk, accepting the fear, even saying it aloud may not be a bad thing. Writing it on the white board during the meeting may be exactly the point you need to make. Groan through it or grow through it, warriors on your team will choose growth.

Scaring people into performing with threats is probably never a good idea. Facing fear for growth is powerful.

Should Fear Become Habit?

Moderation may be the key for success. Telling yourself or your team repeatedly to be afraid may make fear become a habit. It may signal the habit of, never leave the comfort zone because it is far too scary. This is likely a habit you’ll want to avoid.

Be brave, speak of the challenge, accept it and grow. Fear as a habit will likely leave you behind.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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positive culture appreciative strategies

3 Ways to Create a More Positive Culture and Scale Up

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Positivity is a popular discussion item. People talk about being positive, but what they really mean is that they are trying to not be negative. What about scale up versus scale down or spin up versus spin down? Are you part of creating a positive culture?

Our modern society has some interesting interest groups. We have groups who focus on helping the less fortunate. Groups interested in global environmental changes, and we even have the minimalist groups, those who might focus on reduction.

Up or Down

In our business communities and inside our organizations, we sometimes see challenges with growth and rapid expansion. We might also see interest in driving down costs, eliminating waste, and improving efficiency.

Scaling is a hot word. The buzz question might be, “How are you scaling up?”

We might encounter somewhat of a paradox, yet few connect the dots. Considering all of the scaling, all of the focus on eliminating waste and all of the setting of standards and strictly adhering to them, is there room for a positive culture?

Is it possible to shrink, reduce, and eliminate your way to more? More growth, more sales, and more profit? Does the mindset of reduction create a cultural shift of reduce and stabilize? Is this an act of scaling up or scaling down? Does it create a positive culture or a negative, declining culture?

Positive Culture

Here are three ways you can work towards a positive culture and scale up:

  1. Encourage more. Often there is so much effort spent on reduction and elimination that more of anything feels wrong to employee teams. Change the wording, the symbols, and the traditions that place value on reduction. Make them more about prosperity and growth.
  2. Customer emphasis. Nearly everyone says that they are customer focused but are they? When the focus is reduction, elimination, and high efficiency the best question might be, “How does this impact the customer?” Are prices dropping, value increasing, and are services expanding?
  3. Scale up. Everything needs to stay within budget and profit is always critically important but you likely will not grow when your focus screams shrink. Encourage renewed outreach and get the customer more involved. Connect more and make your story about growth not squeeze.

Scaling

Certainly, the mind-set of positive thinking is powerful. It isn’t just words or it isn’t necessarily just the opposite of negative thinking. Your culture might use words that seem positive when the exact nature of actions and behaviors are spinning down, not up.

Is your business or organization creating a positive culture?

Scale up.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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career shift appreciative strategies

Career Shift: Moving Past the Easy Stuff

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You see some interesting things in my line of work. Many people proclaiming to be eager about making a difference for their business, their career, and their life. Certainly, I see many businesses and people improve, but do they really make a business or career shift that meets or exceeds their potential?

The expression that hindsight is 20/20 or that it is easy to be a Monday morning quarterback has truth but the biggest gap I often see is another expression, “Talk is cheap.”

Motivation for Change

It is not uncommon when I engage in a generational differences discussion that someone will bring up the concept of being lazy or lacking motivation.

Often the generations of people who have been around longer are passing judgment or stereotypes on those generations newest in our workforce. Regardless of where the finger is being pointed, the accusations are still present.

The presenting question often is, “How do we motivate these people?” Answers aren’t really that difficult. On the other hand, creating the change necessary to execute the required behaviors or culture is the challenge.

It seems that there is a trend for easy. Relax more, work less, and enjoy life. Maybe everyone wants that, it sounds very inviting.

More Than Talk

People who want to change their life, change their career, or change their business must be committed to change. I’ll often ask clients if they are committed and time and time again they tell the story and say the right words, but, “Talk is cheap.

Change can often happen without any growth or control over your own fate. So you can change without growth but you’ll never grow without making some changes.

People and businesses settle into habits, habits that generate daily activities, thought processes, and attitudes. When it really comes down to the effort for change, they don’t realize that they must change those habits and traditions to get a different result.

Talking about change, planning for change, or seeing the goal is not the act of creating change.

Change often sounds simple. Just like the idea that everyone knows the concepts of customer service or how to be a leader. Knowing the concepts and successfully executing them are two completely different things.

Career Shift

People who are on the move, the ones who are really changing, they’ve moved past the easy stuff. They are finished talking. Talking wastes their time.

If you really want a career shift, you’ll have to decide what you are going to give up, throw away, or move to the side.

You’ll have to move past the easy stuff, the cheap stuff, and the daydreams.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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create your career appreciative strategies

Habits Create Your Career

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Chances are good you’ve probably encountered this idea, “To change your circumstances you have to change your habits.” Have you thought about how habits create your career?

I’m fortunate to work with a lot of different people who are all in some way connected with a workplace, a job, or shaping their career. Much of my work is focused on helping to shape business outcomes as compared with individual performance, but I do some of both.

Individual Efforts and Outcomes

Considering individual efforts, I often see frustration from people who are truly trying to make a difference. They aren’t looking for Easy Street and they don’t want a free ride. Yet they often feel stuck.

As a society I believe we are becoming more programmed to hurry up, then wait, and then hurry up, and then wait some more. Things happen fast, the pace is brisk. We feel like waiting for anything, is a waste of time.

The reality is that when it comes to your job, a business venture, or your career, it is still one step at a time. There really aren’t any fast tracks, quick fixes, or short cuts.

Ask yourself, “What did I accomplish yesterday?”

What about last week or last month? Where were you six months ago? And if you’ve been in the workforce for a while, how were you positioned five years ago or even ten?

I’m not asking you to relive everything that went wrong. I’m asking you to consider what things looked like then. Maybe they seemed better or maybe they seemed a little worse.

What is most important is where you are going!

Chances are you’re reading this because you care about your career. You’ve worked hard but there is still more to accomplish. Your career doesn’t just happen overnight, it is based on actions and behaviors repeated over time. The results develop from what you invest in.

Create Your Career

If you invest in reading a book, watching a video, or in some way connecting with new (quality) information and learning about something connected with your career each day you’ll become better. It should be each day, progressively, across time.

Think about what you do and what you talk about. What do you read, write, or send via text. What do your social media interests look like? How are you spending your time?

When you think about what you want for your future it might be helpful to consider the evidence from your past. Who you were a few years ago might not be who you are today. The difference is created by how you’ve spent your time.

Chances are you’re becoming someone. You’re creating something.

Habits create your career.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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learning is fundamental

Sometimes Learning is Fundamental

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Career minded individuals are always interested in learning. Do you believe learning is fundamental?

Many people read books, participate in seminars, or attend a university.

There is little doubt that there is great value in all of those activities. Is that where the best learning takes place?

Perhaps this is good for some things in life. Perhaps this type of learning expands our knowledge, and we know that absorbing more information can be beneficial, even powerful. Is that all there is to it?

Learning from Results

I can still remember when I learned how to tie my shoes, count money, and ride a bike.

I learned by someone showing me the way, giving me encouragement, and maybe a little push. On the surface I guess it would seem that I learned by doing it.

Looking back though, it probably wasn’t by doing it. It was by learning from the missed attempts. I learned from the knots in the strings, getting the math wrong, or by the scratched up knee.

I didn’t tie the strings right the first time because I first had to listen and see the way.

Counting the money correctly was challenging, because first I needed to learn the denomination represented by each coin.

I couldn’t balance the bike, peddle, and steer all at the same time, but I watched others do it and immediately knew it was something I wanted to try.

All of those were components of my success, but they didn’t create it.

It wasn’t until I tried it for myself. Until I risked something, made myself vulnerable, and was willing to accept failed attempts.

Learning is Fundamental

It’s really no different today. Gaining all of the fundamentals are important, but if you’re really going to do something worthwhile you’re going to have to put in a little bit more.

You’re going to have to make yourself vulnerable, accept some risk, and be prepared for failed attempts.

More importantly, you’re going to have to learn from them.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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career to chance

Leaving Your Career to Chance

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So many people are hustling to build their reputation, stand out, and improve their career. Many people are in search of opportunities, or better yet, creating some. Are you leaving your career to chance?

It’s a smart move to put effort into your career. If you are career focused chances are good that you spend well over 2,000 hours per year working on it. The hard pushers might spend more than 3,000 hours.

Career conscious individuals are also probably allocating at least 1% of their time on continuing education. Some will spend much more. They’re learning, growing, and adapting through training, coaching, or even just reading. Do these smart hustlers leave their career to chance?

Career to Chance

Your chance of a lifetime might come today, or it might be tomorrow. Actually, when you’re really focused you can make nearly any day the chance of a lifetime.

Many people work really hard preparing for the big meeting, the deal locking client engagement, or exploring opportunities with a prospective employer. All of that hard work is critical and important. It makes you prepared and conditions you for what you expect to happen next.

The truth is that your next chance, the chance of your lifetime, might just pop-up out of nowhere. Those chances happen when you are open and receptive to change. They happen when you are ready and able to embrace that next challenge.

Pink Volkswagens

A good friend once asked me, “How many pink Volkswagens have you seen?”

Many of you reading this might know this story, but I’ll bust open the plot for you. It is that likely you haven’t noticed many, but now that you are looking you’ll see more. At least there always that chance.

Your Next Chance

Be on the lookout for your next chance. Be conscious of your next moves. Get prepared.

Consider who you’ll reach out to or what relationships you’ll discover and build. Think about who can you inspire or who might inspire you?

Make the connections, find new leads. Build a system. Present ideas and transform efforts.

Leaving your career to chance?

Your chance might be right now.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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How to Stick With Your Plan

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Have you ever asked yourself, “How will I stick with my plan?” Often the plan is not too complex, the timeline is reasonable, and the level of personal or professional growth is attainable. So what limits your success? Why do so many still come up short?

business people group in a meeting at office

Coming Up Short

Much of my business is focused on helping individual people or entire organizations reach for more. I work with clients to do coaching programs, training and development, and even create some incredible strategic plans, but not all of them will accomplish their goals.

Often the hardest thing for us to do as people is to stay focused and committed to the plan. That doesn’t mean that the plan cannot change, it doesn’t mean that it isn’t fluid, and it doesn’t mean that it won’t be hard, but a lack of commit to the plan is almost always the beginning of a looming failure to achieve the goal.

Blame

Many will find situations or circumstances to blame, they might cite a lack of motivation, discipline, or even blame it on a lack of time. The truth is that while all of those things might be a factor, they aren’t the real reason.

The real reason is that you or the employee teams responsible for the goals and outcomes didn’t follow through.

You fell back to old habits, made excuses to abort activities or tasks because they felt awkward, cumbersome, or simply not within your comfort zone. Time is often blamed, there isn’t enough or the old way was faster.

If you’re going to make changes you are going to have to stick with your plan.

Becoming Sticky

How do you make that happen? Here are a few tips:

  1. Be realistic. Make sure that your goals are worthy of stretching and reaching, but they must also be realistic. Losing 10 pounds in two days probably isn’t realistic and neither is increasing sales or production efficiencies by triple digit percentages within a very narrow window of time. Stretch is good, unrealistic is not.
  2. Check results. You must always be measuring to your goal. Smaller goals that are progressive are often much better than larger goals that feel overwhelming and cause people to stall or stop. Provide visual aids as reminders, put it on your calendar if that makes sense, and frequently measure your distance to a milestone or the goal.
  3. Stay focused. Don’t stray from your plan or the activities associated with it. It will be easy to tell yourself that something else is more important, or that the timing isn’t right, or you’re just not in the right mood. If you are so compelled to talk yourself out of the actions that support your plan, revisit the plan, make an adjustment if necessary, and stick with the new plan.

Nearly all people and organizations will face hurdles, obstacles, and other scenarios that may result in shortcomings or failures, but that doesn’t mean that it’s time to stop, quit, or send the plan to the recycle bin.

Keep your plan fluid and flexible, but make sure you don’t lose sight of the bigger picture.

Even the goal can change, but it must still be something that pulls you towards it and draws you in.

Will you stick with your plan?

The answer is easy—only if you want to.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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5 Ways to Grow Your Career

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Growth in your career or job role isn’t always about waiting patiently, getting lucky, or being someone’s buddy. While any one of those might help out, they don’t represent what allows most people to move forward. Do you want to grow your career?

Grow your career

Through my consulting and coaching practice I come across a lot of people who tell me that they want job or career growth. They will often deliver a very compelling story to me about how they’ve waited in line, paid their dues, and still they find themselves stuck.

Sure, sometimes we might see someone who appears to have good luck give them a helping hand or someone in their family provided a connection, or their opportunities come from family money, but there are plenty of ways to grow your career without any of those.

Grow Your Career

Here are five of my favorites:

  1. Extend your network. Today more than ever before we have options to create a broader reach. It’s important to get to conferences, association events, and seminars, but you also have to make the best use of your time while there. Purposely meet some new people, introduce yourself, and then be sure to secure the future of that effort by connecting in your social media network such as LinkedIn.
  2. Read. Some people believe we are operating in an information overload environment but that is really the good news. You have millions of opportunities and choices to read something every day. It doesn’t matter what platform you choose (digital or more traditional hard copy) but you should try to squeeze some of this in every day or at least weekly. Subscribe to blogs that offer both validity and reliability, download a book, go to a library, or buy a book from a retail bookstore or Amazon.
  3. Be more visible. I swear there are many great people out there who go completely unnoticed. It’s true, there are plenty. Extending your network will help and you can even find some additional tips online. Consider attending meetings, asking a question or two, and sometimes even tooting your own horn. In many circles anyone can be just another face in the crowd unless they engage with others.
  4. Listen better. It might feel like you’ve heard this too many times, but you must always strive to listen more and listen better. Listening is not the same as hearing and as such you have to develop good listening skills. Listening takes a lot of energy and because of this we often don’t listen well. Fatigue is sometimes a factor, so no kidding, get your rest, but also be patient, don’t form quick judgments, be sure to appropriately paraphrase, and avoid bias.
  5. Role model. One of the best things you can do is select one or more good role models. Find someone you admire and look up to, consider how they interact with others, how they are building their network and what they’ve done to progressively accomplish more. It doesn’t mean you agree with all of their actions or behaviors but there is definitely something positive you can learn.

Create Goals

If you’re reading this improving your job role or improving your career is probably important to you. Don’t stop with just reading this, don’t think about it off and on today or tomorrow and then go right back into your same old routine.

Create some goals for all five of these areas, or at least pick three of the five. Have specific measurements such as identifying (which ones, how many?) and attending meetings, meeting (5, 10, or 100) new people, or selecting one or two role models for observation. Each day, week, or month check in on your goals.

Hold yourself accountable. Grow your career.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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