Tag Archives: communication

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listening improves customer service

How Listening Improves Customer Service

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Many organizations who actually take the time to self-reflect suggest that one area they could improve is in their communication. Listening is one of the most fundamental and easily improved skills. Have you considered how listening improves customer service?

As a business consultant and organization development professional, I hear it all the time. I hear it mostly because I am listening, listening carefully and watch the non-verbal cues. Many businesses believe they are too good to change.

Their focus is either on the CEO’s area of expertise, often a technical skill, or on getting more sales. Neither of these are a problem, until; their focus becomes their blind spot.

Blind Spots

I’ve heard CEO’s of small businesses ($15k – $65k annual revenue) repeatedly suggest that they are too big to fail. Some of them flat out say it. Others are saying it when you listen through the words.

If you’re following along closely, you might wonder why I’m even in the room? Think about that for a moment. Honestly, I’m typically there because someone on the team has suggested to bring me in and the top brass tolerates it because they hope it will silence the team.

Now, I’m not bashing my clients, not at all. I’m honestly trying to help. However, too big to fail sometimes equates to too big to listen. This is most likely why the second string in the C Suite has recommended we work together. The first string tolerates it, again hoping to calm the restless.

Besides, they would never want to be accused of not supporting the team. The team needs this, but perhaps they do not, at least that may be the thought.

Customer Service Connection

The customer service connection should be starting to become clear. We’re in a service oriented economy. That isn’t really new, it has been shifting for decades, and many believe that it is accelerating.

In a service economy, the most valuable core principles should be closely aligned with [customer] service. This is important internally and externally. It is important for sales, brand promise, and understanding lifetime value.

Where are most organizations focused? They are focused on the external, closing the sale, increasing profit, and forging new relationships. Certainly, of course they are, as they should be. However, their focus on external push often eliminates listening to the service requirements.

Listening Improves Customer Service

How does this happen? Too big to fail, equates to too big to listen, which makes their actions and behaviors consistent with too big to care.

Caring is one of the most violated principles in a service economy. They may care, but sometimes they care incorrectly. Caring about closing the sale is sometimes not the same as caring enough to listen.

Listening, that is where it all starts. Not hearing, but listening.

In case you’re wondering, there is a difference.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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in a vacuum appreciative strategies

Does Your Best Work Happen In a Vacuum?

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How do you create your best work, alone or with help? Certainly, sometimes a lack of interruptions equates to more productivity, but for most, the real work comes about from collectively working with others. Would you create more success or less by working in a vacuum?

Less Interference and More Productivity

Doing it all is a large task, and one that probably will lack efficiency, insight, and will only fulfill the needs of the few. Employees sometimes argue that they could accomplish more with fewer meetings, fewer interruptions of their work, and by cutting back on their reporting requirements.

Different but somehow similar, employees might wish their inbound email would decrease. They may wish the questions from others wouldn’t be so silly, and even that their phone would stop ringing.

Still there is more, there are the employees who just want to sell, the ones who only want to design, and the ones who just want to count the money.

Certainly, capitalizing on the true talents and interests of each employee is valuable. Depending on the job, time set aside to concentrate and think about what you are doing might help to create some great work. Getting away from unproductive meetings and compiling unread reports may help too.

In a Vacuum

Chances are great though that your best work doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It doesn’t happen without help, influence, and the trial and error that involves others. It doesn’t happen without good communication, or with no communication at all.

Your best work may come from combining the insights from others, even when you disagree, even when you believe there is a different path, and especially when you’ve hit a few stumbling blocks.

One person may be great at marketing and another great at sales. There are also those who are great at design and some that are exceptional at the build. Still some will be the best with money management and others thrive with keeping everyone accountable to the plan.

Best Work

The ones who figure this out early and understand that they need more input, more thoughts, and more capabilities will usually achieve more.

The best way to move a heavy object is with leverage. It works for big success too.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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website changed

The Website Changed, I’m Lost

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Boredom makes most people feel unhappy. It may also inspire them to find something to do, something that takes up time and changes the outcome. In a technology driven world, most of us are logging on. What feeling do you have when you notice the website changed?

Most of us like and enjoy progress. Many of us hate relearning something that we see no value in, is a website change a customer service story. You bet, because all of the users of the site are customers.

Website Changed

Passwords are necessary to hold back the hackers. Even people who leave their Facebook page open on their phone may be surprised to find some silly post one of their otherwise bored teenagers decided to playfully do on their behalf.

I’m not sure if this applies to everyone, but for some reason I have a visual connection with remembering my password. Change my log in screen and I can’t remember the password.

Passwords are annoying and represent one of the pains we are currently dealing with as a user. There must be a better way.

Websites are a touch point with your customer. They are supposed to be easy to use, intuitive, and friendly. Are they?

Perhaps we can suggest that some of them are, or even that many of them are—until they change. Then we might become lost.

Standards of Communication

There is an attempt at standards. Green buttons should be for go, buttons labeled “next” should move us forward, and “submit” should indicate that we are sending the information. Most work in this manner but not all.

The websites that we use, the standards that we become accustom to, and the buttons that we click are a form of communication. Communication is the foundation for building an exceptional customer experience.

Knowing how to fix the website, how to make it better when you are bored, or when you believe that it is getting stale may involve technical skills, but to keep customers happy it is more about communication.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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ask more questions

Leadership Habit 44: Ask More Questions

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Communication is critical. Nearly everyone expresses the importance of communication but have you thought about your communication habits? Should you ask more questions?

It’s not uncommon, people communicate to be heard. Sometimes asking questions can be more valuable than telling. When you truly understand the value in communication you might discover that it is more important to listen.

Asking questions creates an environment for listening. Will more questions improve communication?

Ask More Questions

More questions help to improve communication in many ways. Here are a dozen of many:

  1. Drive purpose. Besides income, people connect with their job based on purpose.
  2. Clarify assumptions. Confusion often exists between design and the final outcome.
  3. Allow for new directions. Shift thinking or pivot to new areas of focus.
  4. Prompt more questions. More questions might be the best way to get things right, the first time.
  5. Set vision. What will it look like? Everyone will get a better picture when their questions are answered.
  6. Invite creativity. There might be more than one way or one possibility.
  7. Restore hope. Doubts set limits and hold things back. Questioning the possibilities sometimes restores hope.
  8. Create flexibility. Rules and guidelines are very important, so is a reasonable amount of flexibility.
  9. Confirm actions. Getting things right will lead to more future success.
  10. Set examples. Wondering what happens next. Ask and you’ll know.
  11. Change attitudes. Understand what makes the effort worthwhile.
  12. Drive better habits. What you question might be your focus. Focus on better habits.

Have you ever considered how questions can become the game changer? Instead of demands, rules, and policies, questions might the best way to send your message.

Communication is Critical

If you believe communication is critical then having a habit of asking more questions just might make things easier.

You really have nothing to lose, only more to gain.

Are you asking enough questions?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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customer service culture appreciative strategies

When Communication Drives Customer Service Culture

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Ask an organization about their customer service and they’ll often tell you a lot. It’s not uncommon that they believe they are doing great, or at least doing okay. Does internal communication drive customer service culture?

Occasionally when I’m working with a client I might ask how they measure customer service. It is not uncommon to get responses such as:

“No worries, if we screw something up our customers let us know.”

“We send out a survey every month, responses are typically very favorable.”

“We get a lot of feedback, most of it is positive.”

Some customers never complain, some will never fill out a satisfaction survey, and some will elect not to tell you of a shortcoming. However, they might tell a dozen of their friends.

Internal Communication

Customer service is driven, at least in part, by the internal communication. Communication and the culture of the organization set the tone for the customer experience.

Here are three common communication and cultural pitfalls:

  • Sales performance. The logic here is that sales performance is okay. If it were really bad or slowing we might have to dig deeper to understand if we have a customer service problem. Since most of the feedback offered by customers is good and our sales are stable or growing we’re doing okay. Just keep doing what we’re doing.
  • Customer education. Sometimes the belief is that the customer is not very smart. They wouldn’t be having problems if they only knew how to use the product or its associated tools. Certainly sometimes educating the customer is important, but assuming that the customer will figure it out is a dangerous proposition. Inappropriately stereotyping ignorance might be the fastest way to lose market share.
  • Accepted quality. Striving for exceptional quality requires constant effort. It might also require rework and do over’s. Forcing your customers to make your (inferior) quality their quality is never a good idea. Customers might accept a lot of levels of quality, but when your quality doesn’t measure up, they might go somewhere else.

Customer Service Culture

What do you hear in your organization? What is the internal communication?

“Sales are okay. We’re doing okay.”

“The customer is an idiot.”

“Looks good enough, ship it and we’ll see what happens.”

What is the talk?

Communication drives culture.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Meeting Management: How Long Should Meetings Last?

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Make no mistake about it. Meetings can be both valuable and important. The question many people ask about meeting management is, “How long should the meeting last?”

Meeting Management Appreciative Strategies

Just to be clear, there are many different types of meetings. There are status meetings and update meetings. There are the meetings known as staff meetings, manager meetings, sales meetings, and roll out meetings. Let’s not forget about the idea of brainstorming meetings, project meetings, and the meeting about the meeting.

Communication and Attention Span

Meetings are typically about communication. In fact, I can’t think of a meeting scenario that isn’t involving the need for effective communication. So we might ask ourselves, “How long can we hold the participants attention?”

Interest in the topic will have a lot to do with the attention span. People binge watch a television series on NetFlix for hours and hours, they are captivated by the unfolding plot, episode after episode.

Certainly this might be quite different from a workplace meeting even though you might argue that there is often drama in both.

Conferences, training sessions, and other forms of educational endeavors might continue on for hours, some of this goes back to participant attention and desired outcomes.

Brain Power

Should we consider brain power or cognitive factors?  I think this is where the real answer to the question exists. If meeting participants are expected to brainstorm, make good decisions, or come up with solutions for problems then it only makes sense that you want the best from them.

Have you read the book, Willpower? If the concept of the psychology behind willpower interests you at all, this is a great read. I especially enjoyed the chapter, Decision Fatigue.

My synopsis of this chapter is that there are several key factors associated with the ability to make good choices. We might consider things like nutrition, stress, and the amount of choices involved.

People often associate physical activity with the need for fuel (food), but mental activity requires a great deal of energy (fuel) too. This might be justification for having food or snacks at your meeting!

Meeting Management

So what is the answer?  How long should meetings last?

The obvious answer might be that it depends. Another answer might be, as long as productivity for the desired outcome continues. Yet another answer might be until the desire outcome is achieved. If the meeting begins to become unproductive and the outcome hasn’t been achieved you might need to reconvene at another time.

Are you looking for the answer to the weekly or monthly sales meeting, staff meeting, or other routine information sharing and gathering sessions?

Most experts would probably advise creating and committing to an agenda of less than 60 minutes.

Do you have an opinion about meeting management and length? What is your experience?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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Start Listening For Facts, It Might Change Your Career

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People talk, and sometimes people listen. Have you ever truly considered what you are hearing? Are you listening for facts?

Listening for facts

One of the biggest struggle spots with our communication, or perhaps miscommunication comes from our listening skills. Of course this is not a surprise but have you ever stopped to consider how you are speaking or what you are hearing?

Listening is not the same as hearing. We hear sounds, noises, and even voices. Hearing is instinctual, it comes naturally. Listening is a developed skill.

Speaking With Opinions

Many people speak with opinions. They offer their beliefs, values, or understandings as being factual even though they might be nothing more than their opinion.

  1. We went to the movies last night and saw the best movie ever!
  2. Try the peanut butter pie at Frank’s Restaurant on the corner of 4th and Elm. They have the best peanut butter pie.
  3. Sally is such a morning person.
  4. I’ve known Jack for years. He is a really nice guy.
  5. Please email me the report when you are finished. I need it sooner rather than later.

While we are navigating our life or our workplace, we often accept what we hear as being completely factual. In addition, misunderstandings often happen when our message is not clear.

Listening For Facts

Let’s consider the statements just presented, only this time, let’s look for them to be more factual.

  1. We saw a great movie last night. I thought it was the better than most because in the end the underdog came out on top.
  2. I’ve had peanut butter pie at many restaurants, the one I like the best is at Frank’s Restaurant on the corner of 4th and Elm.
  3. Sally always gets to work in the morning before I do.
  4. Whenever I see Jack he smiles and shakes my hand.
  5. When you finish with the report please email it to me. I need it before my 9:00 AM meeting tomorrow.

Clearer, more precise, perhaps a little longer sometimes, but speaking with facts helps everyone develop a better understanding. One problem is that many of us not only speak with our opinions, but we try to make it very compelling so the listener is accepting it as being factual.

Career Changer

There is great value in understanding more about facts and opinions, especially when buying or selling. When you are selling, you’ll want to be very compelling. Even when it is just your ideas being sold to your boss or the board of directors.

Listen to yourself, be aware of the messages you are sending. We might have strong feelings about many things in life, but if we want accuracy we should be more careful about how we communicate.

Consequences for not understanding the difference between a fact and an opinion can be big. Miscommunication and misunderstandings are costly for businesses and perhaps costly for your career.

When we are hurried or trying to do two things at once, we often don’t listen well. That is a fact.

Take the time, or make the time. Start listening for facts.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Communicating with the C-Suite

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It can be elusive, scary, and a place where people sometimes go and are never seen again. Some people will work for most of the career striving to get to the C-Suite, others prefer to avoid it.

business people group on meeting

Is it harder to communicate with those occupying the tower of the elite? If you’re not in the tower, the feeling just might be an overwhelming, yes.

What makes it so difficult? Aren’t these just people?

Yes, of course, but their charge is somewhat different. Sure everyone is working toward some contribution for the greater good of the organization, but those in the C-Suite are operating under a different kind of pressure. Their pressure is intense, their time very limited, and often they face decisions for setting direction that could result in an enormous victory or become the harshest defeat.

Do you have success communicating with the C-Suite? Are you looking for ways to improve?

Here are a few tips that might help:

  1. Be straight forward. Time is critical for everyone, and those in the C-Suite are definitely concerned about time. Details, drama, or indecisiveness tend to slow things down and time often feels like it is already working against them. Dance less, and give it to them straight.
  2. Bring evidence. Opinions are not facts. If you’re seeking permission or direction for a decision it might help to have a little proof in your proposal. Statistics, white papers, or stock reports might help your cause, but so will street smart news reports or details about a marketing campaign recently launched by a competitor.
  3. Be compelling. If you deliver like a church mouse, you’re probably not commanding enough respect. Chances are good that arrogance is too much, but having appropriate confidence, showing passion for your thoughts or ideas, and having a concise delivery will help bring clarity to your message.
  4. Deliver trusted information. There is a good chance that your C-Suite executive needs more information but their challenge is getting the right information. Their data needs to be reliable and valid. Often they are provided with so much information from so many different resources they simply don’t know who or what to trust. Become that trusted resource.
  5. Be patient. While the C-Suite often operates at a lightening pace, it might seem like a turtle race to others in the organization. If you’re going to build a strong relationship with those in the tower you’re going to have to learn to be patient. What feels urgent to you might have a very low priority for them. When in doubt, stay calm and be patient.

Communication drives all that we do. The very best organizations are great communicators from the top to the bottom and from the bottom to the top.

Avoidance, hesitation, or procrastination likely won’t improve the outcomes of any communication, especially communication with the C-Suite.

Make sense?

Sweet, you’ve got this!

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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3 Things That Make People Feel More Appreciated

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You’ve heard it before and so have I, people want to know that their work is appreciated, that they are respected, and that their contributions matter. If everyone knows this, then why do so many feel under-appreciated?

more appreciated

Let’s start by making sure we are on the same page with appreciation. Here are three things that when practiced, make a difference.

Show Respect

One of the biggest things that employees are giving (being paid for) is their time. Respect everyone’s time. Value their time as much as you value your own. Start and end meetings on time. Show up on time, and don’t ask someone to stay late while you exit to hit happy hour, be with your family, or other non-work related activities. They have a life too, and likely they aren’t excited about staying late or being rushed because someone else failed to plan or prepare appropriately.

Another gesture of respect is to, ask don’t tell. Ask for help or assistance, don’t tell someone to do it. Ask for the person or team to take on a backlogged project or one that is not so prestigious but still needs to be completed. Ask don’t tell, it always makes a difference.

This is simple stuff, right?

Ask for Input

When and where possible include others in decisions and setting future direction.

Think about starting conversations with things like:

  • Do you think we should…
  • How do you think our clients would react to…
  • What is most important for improving…

This should not be an exercise, but a true and genuine approach for inclusion. If you are only doing it as an exercise it won’t take long to matter as little to them, as it does to you.

No rocket science here, right?

Give Thanks

Unfortunately it is still not uncommon for supervisors, managers, or other positions of authority to demonstrate an attitude with employees that the employee should be thankful they have a job. Yes, it might often be true, but it should never be illustrated as a cultural value. You might be surprised the number of front line employees that I speak with who would jump through hoops for someone just because they know the person values and appreciates their work. Yes, you are paying them (in nearly all cases) but that is compensation, not appreciation.

You might be surprised how engaged and motivated even the most marginal employee will become when they know they are valued and their work is appreciated.

This is really straight forward, the a-b-c’s, am I right?

Why then, do so many employees feel under-appreciated?

The answer is simple. Nearly everyone knows or easily understands the approaches for making others feel more valued and appreciated. That isn’t the problem. It’s not a lack of knowledge.

It is a lack of practice.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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How Do You Measure Meeting Effectiveness?

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How many meetings do you have? Are there too many? Do feel meetings help or hinder productivity?

business people group on meeting at modern bright office

Have you ever felt that workplace meetings are a waste of time? Many people I speak with at organizations believe that they are involved in too many meetings or meetings that last far too long. Meetings certainly have their purpose and of course are connected to the concept of ensuring effective communication, but how do we measure meeting effectiveness?

Why Meetings?

First let’s consider why we hold meetings. There are many different flavors from brainstorming and strategy, to information exchange, to organizing and planning for an upcoming event, and many others. When you ask around it seems that people don’t mind the strategy sessions as much as they do the repetitive information exchange with the same old details, problems, and unresolved issues. Workplace meetings might sometimes be labeled as staff meetings, sales meetings, or department meetings with varying formats, frequencies, and lengths of time.

Do these meetings energize people? Often these regularly held and traditional information updates do not. In some cases these meetings are managed to feel like sessions for bragging rights or workload comparison between people or departments that should feel camaraderie but instead feel more like they are vying for the most kudos or in some type of competition with each other. Certainly some friendly internal competition can be effective, but it also has to be managed appropriately and always should reinforce that the organization is most effective as a team and that everyone is in it together.

Measuring Effectiveness

Do you have too many meetings? In order to properly assess if you are having too many meetings you should first consider the value and productivity of the meetings you already have. You’ll need to consider if the right people are in attendance and if the meetings are the right length of time. You’ll need specific agendas, goals, and recaps along with accountability to ensure you’re getting the most from them. There is a really good chance that the meetings you have in place are supposed to improve communication but you must keep in mind that the act of simply having a meeting will not necessarily improve communication. Additionally your meetings will need to have appropriate accountability, respect, and trust.

You should also consider participant engagement. Today we might hold meetings that include BYOD (bring your own device) or we might attend a meeting that insists on no devices being active, and in others you might have something in between. What is important to keep in mind is that some of your meeting participants will already know or perhaps completely understand the information being shared. The meeting becomes boring to them; they get disconnected, distracted, and often completely disengaged. You must always evaluate how to best serve the entire audience and in some cases you might want to consider alternative formats, or meetings with different participants and different lengths of time.

To measure effectiveness of any meeting at a minimum you must assess:

  • Frequency
  • Length of time
  • Number of participants
  • Appropriateness for each participant
  • Atmosphere, climate, environment, location
  • Rules or guidelines
  • Goals, objectives, desired outcomes
  • Performance assurance, accountability

Meetings that are not effective, last too long, have the wrong participants, or are held too often or too little will all be problematic for your communication efforts.

When is your next meeting? Will it be effective?

– DEG 

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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