Tag Archives: change

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driving decisions

Driving Decisions Through Culture In Your Organization

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Sometimes it is all that people want. They just want a decision. Do you suspect you know the answer before the final word is delivered? What is driving decisions in your organization?

Impatience is often a problem when people believe they know the correct path. The opposite side of impatience may be analysis. What does the data tell us? What evidence exists?

Decisions and Organizational Flow

While it may seem surprising to some, the organizational culture may be responsible for driving decisions. In larger organizations, a lack of understanding about subcultures may be one of the reasons for resistance or change failure.

Most people want to support the decision, the better your culture the more likelihood of decision support. This is simple, when you have a highly engaged workforce. Many will be easily able to follow the path. They’ll believe in it, and they’ll follow it.

Therefore, the first step that is often cited as getting buy-in, is important. Buy-in can be created in many ways, but at the root of buy-in is culture.

Culture is Powerful

Consider that when the culture is committed to customer service, making changes that will positively impact the customer feel easy. A culture that is commitment to technology use, well, they’ll embrace being the front runners for the latest gadgets.

In somewhat of a contrast, cultures that are committed to the highest quality in their product, much to the surprise of some, often struggle the most with change.

Do you know why? The answer is easy, their workforce is attached emotionally to what they feel is a perfected product. Change may tarnish perfection.

Driving Decisions

Your organization has a culture. Decisions that drive future direction are guided by beliefs. Buy-in for change will be closely attached what employees feel.

As a result, often the roadblocks for change are unknowingly created by the very culture an organization works so hard to create.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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people resist change

How to Manage People Who Resist Change

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Change is happening all around us. Despite any opposition, despite feelings and emotions change is happening. In the workplace, how do you manage the people who resist change?

Announce the new marketing plan, a strategic direction, or personnel changes, and people will disagree. It isn’t the exception, it is what is common.

Listen and Learn

The people who resist change can tell us a lot. First, they self-identify, which is a management bonus right up front. Second, we have to listen carefully. They may have some good points. When properly managed, they can actually help strengthen the change.

What often happens is that those responsible to manage or those responsible to engage with the naysayers attempt to smooth over the change, make everyone happy, and find some neutral ground, compromise.

Will Compromise Work

Compromise seems logical. It feels like the right thing to do. Until no matter how hard or how much you bend, shape, and twist the change there always seems to be another argument about why it isn’t the right direction.

Of course, there is always the possibility that they are correct. Maybe it is a bad move. Perhaps, but when you work around the naysayers long enough you may discover that it is the same people regardless of the change.

It is a pattern. Goals aren’t being achieved, problems are occurring, measurements are accurate but the indications are clear that something needs to change. Still, the naysayers find a reason to resist. Management tries to find a way to appease.

People Who Resist Change

So how can you make everyone happy? It could be that what really makes the naysayers happy is to express that they aren’t happy. They want a voice. They want to be heard. Objections and criticism give them a platform.

The dynamics of any change are situational and circumstantial. However, sometimes the best way to make the naysayers happy is to give them their platform and keep moving forward.

Certainly, it is a delicate balance of knowing, understanding, and making good decisions when you are responsible for the outcomes. Listen carefully and learn, sometimes though you just need to keep moving.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Business culture decisions appreciative strategies

Business Culture Decisions in a New Economy

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Understanding the culture of your business is important. As people, most of us try to brand ourselves based on who we believe we are, not perhaps how others label us. When you think about business culture decisions things shouldn’t be much different, should they?

Unique

One of the most common broadcasts I receive from a new client is, “We are unique.” Certainly, just as every individual is unique so is the culture of most organizations. Organizational culture is shaped by leadership and based largely on the environment.

While cultures may be as unique as personalities, talent, and fingerprints, there are still some commonalities. In fact, largely, the art of doing business is the same. Sell products or services (something), and deliver on your promise.

Culture Then and Now

The culture of 1920 Ford Motor Company is certainly probably different from the culture today. Essentially the same business, but leadership has molded the shape across time. The same could be said for Harley Davidson or IBM.

Is it time for new decisions? A different question may be, “When isn’t it?” Every person and organization makes decisions about who they are, or who they will become. We sometimes suggest that both people and businesses are stuck in time.

Our economy is very different from 1920. It is different from what it was in 1950, and even in the year 2000. For decades our economy has been shifting, today more Fortune 500 companies are representing the service sector or have a significant service component.

Business Culture Decisions

Businesses often change because of need. Internal and external forces exert pressure on organizations, requiring adaptation or perhaps demise.

The real challenge though is in the perceived risk. Staying the same feels safe if it appears to be working. The status quo is what most individuals feel comfortable with, businesses aren’t really much different.

What most people and businesses should be thinking about is if our World, the business environment, or the way we do things, is staying the same, or is everything around us changing? Is anything changing?

If our new economy is the same then I guess there isn’t any need to become different.

Easy decision.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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how change develops

How Change Develops and Early Adopters

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Some of the best businesses are not who they once were. They may still offer some of the original products or services but they aren’t the same. Have you ever considered how change develops?

Mention change and people are going to become nervous, uneasy, and likely afraid. Change feels like a risk to most and anything uncertain may create fear.

People often talk about, no risk, no reward, or they may suggest that the acceptance of change is better than staying in the status quo. Certainly, there is often value in shifting our thinking.

Everything Changes

Everything around us is changing. Given a little time, a lot of time, or sometimes in no time at all.

A vacant lot gets a new home.

The video store becomes a small medical office.

The computer system tells us when it’s time to reorder.

Sometimes change is perceived as developing from past failures. In other cases, it may be labeled as required progress. In nearly all cases, it sparks an emotion for someone.

There is a good chance that the emotions are the result of letting go of something that felt stable, dependable, or even desirable. Things that someone probably worked hard to create, establish, and cared for.

We used to have to make a call from a wired phone, percolate our coffee, or get our music on a record, 8-track tape, or cassette. Yet no one really considers early telephones, coffee percolators, or music records a failure. Perhaps they are not even obsolete.

How Change Develops

Change often develops from need, or an idea to improve.

If you’ve been around long enough, things have changed. As individuals, we learned to tie our own shoes, complete our schoolwork, and report to work.

On the first day of at a new job, it is all new. We don’t always know the people, the culture, or even where to find the restroom.

Just because change is different doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth it, that the past was a failure, or a waste of our time.

What feels like progress to some may be undesirable to others but we are not stopping change.

Understand what to hold on to and what to let go of, because things will continue to change.

How change develops may not be as important as the bravery to be an early adopter.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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website changed

The Website Changed, I’m Lost

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Boredom makes most people feel unhappy. It may also inspire them to find something to do, something that takes up time and changes the outcome. In a technology driven world, most of us are logging on. What feeling do you have when you notice the website changed?

Most of us like and enjoy progress. Many of us hate relearning something that we see no value in, is a website change a customer service story. You bet, because all of the users of the site are customers.

Website Changed

Passwords are necessary to hold back the hackers. Even people who leave their Facebook page open on their phone may be surprised to find some silly post one of their otherwise bored teenagers decided to playfully do on their behalf.

I’m not sure if this applies to everyone, but for some reason I have a visual connection with remembering my password. Change my log in screen and I can’t remember the password.

Passwords are annoying and represent one of the pains we are currently dealing with as a user. There must be a better way.

Websites are a touch point with your customer. They are supposed to be easy to use, intuitive, and friendly. Are they?

Perhaps we can suggest that some of them are, or even that many of them are—until they change. Then we might become lost.

Standards of Communication

There is an attempt at standards. Green buttons should be for go, buttons labeled “next” should move us forward, and “submit” should indicate that we are sending the information. Most work in this manner but not all.

The websites that we use, the standards that we become accustom to, and the buttons that we click are a form of communication. Communication is the foundation for building an exceptional customer experience.

Knowing how to fix the website, how to make it better when you are bored, or when you believe that it is getting stale may involve technical skills, but to keep customers happy it is more about communication.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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breakthrough dennis gilbert appreciative

When a Mistake Becomes a Breakthrough

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People worry a lot about making mistakes. It seems natural we want to make the correct decision. We want to avoid more cost, harsh repercussions, and disappointment. Mistakes aren’t always the end of the line though. Sometimes a mistake becomes a breakthrough.

Making Mistakes

It is often said that a mistake is not bad when you learn from it. Of course, that is reasonable advice and certainly adds value to what may seem really bad at the moment.

Innovation and growth often happen by mistake. Sometimes amazing breakthroughs will develop. It happened with penicillin, sildenafil (Viagra), and minoxidil (Rogaine). They were a big mistake, until they weren’t.

There is no doubt that mistakes can be costly. It is true in nearly any field, but not all mistakes will mean that it is over.

No Variance

Many times, we are taught that we must perfect the process. We need to get to the slightest variation, live and work within minimal and maximal tolerances, and once we produce the desired result, lock it in.

This all seems logical. It seems to make sense, until it doesn’t. It stops making sense when businesses and organizations decide that they need change.

When change is called for the logic is in danger. Now the exact ideology, the focus, the culture that exists around perfection is expected to shift gears and change. Even the concept of continuous improvement is more often about a focus on perfection, not change.

Becomes a Breakthrough

Often the forces driving perfection cause the most struggle. The idea to make something great is counterintuitive to making something new. Concepts of no failure, minimal waste, and fewer resources always make sense, until they don’t.

If you’re going to learn to ride the bike, you might fall. If you swing at the ball, you might miss. The exact project that you are working on might be riddled with errors. That error, that mistake you are worried about, it may be a breakdown, but it may also become a breakthrough.

The difference between the destination that you seek and the place that you arrive may become the best mistake you’ll ever make.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours!, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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your change stick

Can You Make Your Change Stick?

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We sometimes over estimate what can be accomplished short term, but underestimate what our daily effort will produce across time. People who want to change their life or career often make this mistake. It might be important to have the correct frame for making your change stick.

Technology has made many things faster. We can travel faster, communicate faster, and even get our food faster.

Expectations and Frame

Have you ever watched a plant grow, what about a tree? It might be hard to notice the changes each second, every minute, or during an entire day. Across time, there is significant change.

Our reference of time might have a lot to do with our progress and making your change stick. Persistence is important and although it might be hard to measure the result from day-to-day or even month-to-month, there might be positive change.

How we frame, what we see and feel, will have consequences on what we accomplish. Our expectations might be different, our motivation might change, and our habits for success might be more tenacious.

It might be hard to see the growth sometimes but that growth has much to do with our frame. Our frame has much to do with our expectations.

We shouldn’t judge the speed of McDonalds with the speed of a gourmet meal. The expectations should be quite different.

Just because we don’t see a tree growing each day doesn’t mean it isn’t happening. Across time there is significant change.

The same thing might be true for your personal changes or for your career. It might be hard to notice each day, but across time, there is big change.

What if your career lasted only 180 days, or what if it lasted 16,425? What you accomplish in 3,000 days will be different from what you accomplish in 30.

Making Your Change Stick

Yes, it might be about patience, and patience is important, but it is really about your motivation and tenacity.

What is your frame? How do you view your change? What are the expectations?

Too many people use the wrong frame. They expect the tree to bear fruit the first season.

Have the right expectations, be careful how you frame.

Make your change stick.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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join the club appreciative strategies

Should You Join The Club, Any Club?

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Technology has rapidly expanded everyone’s opportunities to learn. It has also expanded opportunities to teach. What is stopping you? Do you want to join the club?

So Many Clubs

On social media platforms alone, there are nearly unlimited opportunities to join groups or open chats. Traditionally, in our communities and around the world there are opportunities to join trade associations and likeminded professionals in nearly every discipline.

Have you joined? What have you found?

Some join because they want to learn. Upon arrival, they determine (or believe) that the group has nothing to offer them. They might believe that they are above the crowd and there is nothing for them to learn. So then, why not teach?

The opposite might also be true. They join the group, or they think about joining the group. Upon exploration, they believe the group is too advanced, they’re not ready, and they retreat. Why not jump in and learn?

Instead, in either case people often avoid the join. What do they learn, not much, either way, right?

Proponents of Change

I am always amazed at the people who claim to be proponents of change but only when change is their way. We see it in all circles of society. We see it in politics, we see it with religion, and we often see it in business.

Not joining the club probably means you are not learning. You might believe that you have maxed out, you are the absolute expert and the world revolves around your principles and philosophies.

Others, those engaged in the groups, they’re growing, changing, and shifting. They are changing the framework, moving the needle, and raising the bar. They are learning or teaching, but there is change.

Everyone else might just be hiding. They aren’t stabilized, they’re declining, declining because as the world continues on, they are standing still.

Join the Club

You have an opportunity to be part of something, to build something, grow something, or learn something.

Not joining means you’ll probably be left behind.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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career shift appreciative strategies

Career Shift: Moving Past the Easy Stuff

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You see some interesting things in my line of work. Many people proclaiming to be eager about making a difference for their business, their career, and their life. Certainly, I see many businesses and people improve, but do they really make a business or career shift that meets or exceeds their potential?

The expression that hindsight is 20/20 or that it is easy to be a Monday morning quarterback has truth but the biggest gap I often see is another expression, “Talk is cheap.”

Motivation for Change

It is not uncommon when I engage in a generational differences discussion that someone will bring up the concept of being lazy or lacking motivation.

Often the generations of people who have been around longer are passing judgment or stereotypes on those generations newest in our workforce. Regardless of where the finger is being pointed, the accusations are still present.

The presenting question often is, “How do we motivate these people?” Answers aren’t really that difficult. On the other hand, creating the change necessary to execute the required behaviors or culture is the challenge.

It seems that there is a trend for easy. Relax more, work less, and enjoy life. Maybe everyone wants that, it sounds very inviting.

More Than Talk

People who want to change their life, change their career, or change their business must be committed to change. I’ll often ask clients if they are committed and time and time again they tell the story and say the right words, but, “Talk is cheap.

Change can often happen without any growth or control over your own fate. So you can change without growth but you’ll never grow without making some changes.

People and businesses settle into habits, habits that generate daily activities, thought processes, and attitudes. When it really comes down to the effort for change, they don’t realize that they must change those habits and traditions to get a different result.

Talking about change, planning for change, or seeing the goal is not the act of creating change.

Change often sounds simple. Just like the idea that everyone knows the concepts of customer service or how to be a leader. Knowing the concepts and successfully executing them are two completely different things.

Career Shift

People who are on the move, the ones who are really changing, they’ve moved past the easy stuff. They are finished talking. Talking wastes their time.

If you really want a career shift, you’ll have to decide what you are going to give up, throw away, or move to the side.

You’ll have to move past the easy stuff, the cheap stuff, and the daydreams.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Change your career

What 3 Percent Will Change Your Career?

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We’ve all seen the food pictures on social media, lots of them. Many people take their food pretty seriously. Some are known as picky eaters. Employers might be seriously picky, how will you change your career?

It seems that there is about three percent making the difference between awesome and, “No thanks, I’ll pass.”

Chicken nuggets without any sauce, a birthday cake without any icing, “No thanks, I’ll pass.”

Tomatoes on my turkey and cheese submarine sandwich or buried under my bun on a Whopper from Burger King, “Nope, they have to go!”

What is the difference between delicious and terrible? I would suggest about three percent.

Your Three Percent

The same might be true for your career. You might want to consider what you have to do to be the special sauce or the icing on the cake. What do you need to remove or eliminate? What will change your career?

I believe that we sometimes overestimate on the big stuff and underestimate on the small. People work really hard on the big stuff. College degrees, fancy titles, getting in with the most predominate and reputable employers. Sure, those things might be important but the game changer might be in the three percent.

Change Your Career

Here are a few things to consider:

  • Do you speak the language? I’m not suggesting the difference between English, Spanish, or French. Do you use words and phrases that are consistent with the organizational culture and mission? Language drives emotions and like it or not emotions condition our likability factor.
  • Are you confident? Confidence is based on our self-efficacy and self-esteem. Confidence can be built, similar to trust it can also easily be destroyed. The difference for confidence is that it is lost only if we allow it. Past mistakes or shortcomings shouldn’t make you feel weak. What is important is what you learned.
  • Do you look the part? This might ruffle some feathers but it might be the tomatoes on the sandwich. Have you thought about what should go? Sure, you can color your hair purple or have a ZZ Top beard you have the right. Is either of those smart for your career? It might depend on the business, but beware.

It’s early in the morning but I’m already thinking about lunch.

I know I’m going to toss the tomatoes on my sandwich.

It will then be perfect.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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