Tag Archives: career

  • 0
job frustration

Job Frustration and the Comparisons We Choose

Tags : 

Feeling frustrated? Wondering where the six figure jobs are, how to get one, and why it hasn’t happened for you? Whether it is salary, perks, or a better office, job frustration is really about comparisons.

Compared to What?

If you were in the workforce prior to 1985 there is a good chance you started your career without much concern about Gigabytes. Much has changed.

Were you in the workforce prior to 1995? If yes, cellular phones were somewhat rare, texting phone-to-phone didn’t exist. Much has changed.

We can find data points and comparisons for 1975, and 2005 too. We are always living in a, “compared to what,” environment.

Perhaps comparison is the root cause of frustration.

Greener Grass

Many know about the, “grass is always greener,” or “keeping up with the Joneses.” We once wondered about comparisons and societal standings with the hit sitcom, The Jeffersons. Today it may be reality television with the Kardashians.

We can compare our lives, style of living, and even our career with reality television in a variety of flavors. If that doesn’t rattle our emotions we can tune in to an even broader perspective through Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Does this lead to job frustration? It certainly can, and often does. We hear of six figure jobs, we see job advertisements with big promises, and we even check published public records just to see how the other side is living.

Frustration can lead to innovation.

A better can opener, coffee maker, and a convection oven. Are these innovative or mostly marketing hype? Many would likely suggest some of both.

If your job and career is important to you, great. What about doing a good job, finishing within budget, and delivering quality work? Is that important, if yes, great.

Does it make you happy?

Job Frustration

Comparisons often don’t make us very happy. Many times, there is some myth, the untold story, or a wild exaggeration. These comparisons make us frustrated.

Job frustration may be about the comparisons we choose. If it isn’t innovative, helping, or making you happy perhaps you need a different comparison.

Consider that there should be a difference between your personal data points and the ones that society suggests.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
career decisions

Career Decisions, Life Decisions, and Things That Move Us

Tags : 

Many willingly admit that it is hard to pick a career path during your mid to late teenage years. Even people with decades of experience are making important career decisions. How do you make good choices?

Available Advice

Advice is always available. Everything from, do what your love and don’t worry about the money, to you must do this because that was the path of everyone in your family.

For good measure you can throw in the advice of, “You are too smart for that choice,” or “That will require you to make a life decision about where you will live.”

Tough choices, all of them. How do you know the correct path?

There are at least three philosophies on these choices:

  1. Let someone else make the choice. It sounds silly but it happens all the time. Parents have helped you save and guided you for a particular school. Now you feel you have no choice of your own. So, you follow a prescribed path.
  2. You are not good enough. You want to become a doctor, lawyer, or engineer, but it has been reinforced across the years that those jobs are for the elite. You’re not in that crowd so avoid it, you’ll never make it.
  3. Stay with the family. I’ve had personal conversations with dozens and dozens of people about career choices that involve maintaining continuity with the family unit. It may be a family business, a geographic area, or generations on a family estate.

Do you see any problems with these philosophies? Is there a pattern?

The pattern is simple because the input is consistent with others guiding the outcome. None of these are allowing you to choose for you.

Career Decisions

There is a key to most career outcomes. You must decide what you want to live with. Not everything is about money, education, or the dreams of someone else.

Some people make a life of making others happy. That is great. Other people wish to take the family crest to a new level. That too, is great.

Your career decisions, whether you are seventeen, or forty-two, may not be so technical. It really boils down to how you want to live, because that is really what you do.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
best career path

Are You Taking The Best Career Path?

Tags : 

It is the question that people ask before they start, the question along the way, and sometimes the question asked as they near the end. “I am on the right path?” The best career path has many variables. What is your path?

Time Matters

We hear it often and sometimes we say it. Life is short. Your career is even shorter. If your career or earning a respectable living is important to you here are a few things to keep in mind.

  1. Most paths are fluid. Many people describe career shifts or changes throughout their lifetime.
  2. Career paths are not always linear. Different than staying fluid, sometimes you may have to navigate sideways, or for a short time backtrack, to get to where you’re going.
  3. While any career may at times feel painstakingly difficult, staying on the wrong path costs more than changing paths.

Best Career Path

What is the best career path? It is may be as simple as suggesting that it is the path you are currently pursuing. People often express the significance of their journey as providing more value than what they experience after arrival at the destination.

Destinations can change. If you leave New York in a car planning to drive to San Jose, California, you can change your mind in Cheyenne, WY and go to Santa Rosa, CA instead. Doesn’t really matter.

On the other hand, leaving New York, and driving to Tarpon Springs, FL, and then deciding your real destination should be Portland, OR, could be more problematic. The longer you are in the wrong direction, the costlier things become.

If you are a carpenter, deciding you want to be a heart surgeon when you are 45 years old is probably going to be difficult.

So, the best thing may be to make sure you are on a road that seems to support your general direction. Know where you don’t want to be.

Everything else may be just part of the journey.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • 3
powerful belief

Powerful Belief and the Facts Surrounding It

Tags : 

Believe you are going to have a good day or a bad day, and you will find lots of evidence to support your belief. Belief has an amazing effect on performance. Do you have powerful belief?

We see it in religion, in politics, and with innovation. Belief often creates power. Have you considered how your belief is guiding your outcomes?

Just the Facts

“Show me the facts!” is often proclaimed as a requirement to establish belief. Yet, much of our discussion, our presentations, and what is repeated is based on theory or opinion.

In the business meeting when people are looking for a reason why the strategy won’t work, they’ll probably find some. Of course, in contrast when the group seeks reasons why something may work or is worth a try, they’ll likely find some.

People with experiences (we all have some) want to share those experiences as facts. We tried this once, it didn’t work, and that is a fact.

Manifested facts become beliefs, and beliefs manifested are often presented as facts.

Seeing Is Believing

We believe what we see. Throughout many forms of media, the persuasion to buy this product so you can look like me, feel like me, and have success like me is overwhelming.

Social media attempts to remind us of how people live large, have luxurious homes, vacations, and “life is good.” We also see some of the opposite. The bad boss story, the customer service horror stories, and the passing of people and pets.

We live surrounded by stories of fame and fortune. And stories of tragedy and gloom. There is not much room for average, yet on the bell curve it is exactly where most people or businesses exist.

Powerful Belief

Powerful belief happens every day. It is connected to decisions, a choice, and what you look for.

Most of what comes true for your career, for sales revenue, or the marketing plan starts with belief.

You decide what you’ll look for. The why’s or the why not’s.

You’ll find it and you’ll believe it.

Powerful.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer. He is a five-time author and the founder of Appreciative Strategies, LLC. His business focuses on positive human performance improvement solutions through Appreciative Strategies®. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • 4
overlooked

Overlooked, Why Fitting In May Leave You Out

Tags : 

It starts with the job offer. The day your employer decides to extend you a job offer may be the first moment you become stuck. Do you feel like you are being overlooked for advancement? Are you wondering what you can do now?

Not everyone is trying to build a respectable career, some only want to supplement the family income. The truth is that most organizations need some of both types of employees.

Point of Hire

When you ask the hiring manager for the behind the scenes honesty about job applicant choices it probably won’t be long until they use the word, fit. Employers are looking for the best fit for the current job opening.

Both potential candidates and employers struggle with finding the right balance of fit versus satisfying future needs.

But you got the job. Six months ago, or ten years ago, and you’re looking for the sure-fire method to advance your career.

Seeking Advancement

There are really only two answers for this situation. One is that this employer is not where you should hang your hat and you should seek a new employer. The other is, that you need to be the best choice for advancement.

Neither answer may be easy, but from my experiences those are the cards you hold in your hand.

Assuming you want to stay with the current employer you must become the best fit for the new or advanced role. That typically occurs with proof.

Proof that you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities, or that you are prepared to get them. It also means the right attitude and continuous demonstration of commitment.

Overlooked

For the organization, perfect employees are often hard to come by, but perfection is usually not their goal.

Prove that you are the best fit and you’ll succeed.

If you are certain that you’ve been crossed off the opportunity for advancement list and that you may be overlooked forever. You probably should consider doing everything you can to continue to fit, but privately you should consider seeking a different employer.

It starts at the point of hire. If the fit is exactly what they need and that need or additional opportunities do not develop across time, fitting in may leave you out.

Out of what? Out of opportunity since you are the best fit for the [current] job.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
models

Role Models & Marinade, Underneath It’s Still Chicken

Tags : 

Who are your role models? Many will suggest that role models are important for success. Not to be copied or duplicated, but to learn from and expand your intellect, value, and worth.

Have your role models created an unrealistic expectation?

Expectations and Reality

On social media it seems that everyone is living the dream, they have the perfect beach picture, the kiddos birthday party, and the hottest car. They also have a flawless complexion, the best smile, and the brightest eyes.

Dr. Hook always wanted to see his picture on the cover of the Rolling Stone. A sense of accomplishment, value, and worth. The feeling of, we made it.

Role models, an image, is it all that it is meant to be? Are role models a positive tactic or do they create unrealistic expectations? Is reality TV really a reality?

Confusion of fantasy and reality seems much easier to create today.

False Perceptions

Technology connected to social media helps us change images, improve complexion, and whiten teeth faster than we can get fries at the McDonald’s drive through lane.

Mainstream news channels feature anchors who are prepped with makeup, hair, and the perfect outfit. We have movie stars with capped teeth, cosmetic surgery, and what appears to be a life of glamour. Yet, they’re all just people.

Role Models

Role models are valuable. They can help us learn and grow. They can give us something to aspire to, motivation to put in the hard work, and develop a sense of pride, accomplishment, and worth.

Role models can also set unrealistic expectations, increase anxiety, and lower self-esteem.

It is always important to keep in mind that underneath all the glamour, the fame, and the clever filter used on the picture, we are all just people.

The President of the business where you work, just a person. The glamour model who looks perfect, just a person. Your friend from high school with the perfect family, kids, and career, still just a person.

You can throw some chicken in marinade for hours, it may look different and taste different, but underneath it is still just chicken.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+

 


  • -
job demands

Job Demands and Getting What You Asked For

Tags : 

There are certainly many different approaches to work, a job, and your career. Some care little about a career, only seeking a means of income to pay the bills. What are your job demands? Are you looking for a career or just a paycheck?

People sometimes call it Karma, others just a bad twist of fate. Do you get back what you put in? Is your connection with your job paying off?

What You Asked For

Most would like to work at an organization where the boss is energetic, farsighted, and encouraging. Most hope for future opportunities, to do the right thing, and are willing to put in the extra effort.

On top of that many seek camaraderie with co-workers, they want to be around others who are interesting, who help inspire, and those who are productive.

They expect the work to be challenging, to grow and learn because of it, and to create or do work that really matters. These same people don’t seek the easiest job, but the path that will help them grow and to build something bigger or better.

They probably also expect future opportunities, a chance to make a greater difference, and to increase their income across time. They are willing to work hard for respect, to be a trusted adviser, and to make a positive impact.

When this defines you, you probably aren’t looking for the stick in the mud, the person who hides and cowers, or the bully who threatens anyone who challenges the status quo.

Job Demands

What are your job demands? What are the requirements that bring you back day after day to take on the challenge of work that makes you proud?

When your purpose is to make a difference, build something together, and fulfill the obligations of the customer it may not be hard to get what you ask for. Your biggest challenge may be to find the community of co-workers who are seeking the same.

When people are focused on exceeding customer expectations and are doing it together, the job demands feel worthwhile.

More importantly, you’ll always get back what you put in. It is exactly what you asked for.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten RespectNavigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
attraction matters

Attraction Matters For Your Success

Tags : 

There are people who don’t like baseball, apple pie, and certain automobile manufacturers. Who do you appeal to, who is in your crowd, your network, or your tribe? Do you believe attraction matters?

To some extent we all sell, we all market, and we all deliver a customer service promise. We do it in business, and we do it person to person without a formal business model or plan. Wouldn’t it be great to connect with lots of people who share in the same or similar aspirations for life, community, or career?

Much of this may depend on your market reach, where you spend your time, and what your formal philosophy on life is all about.

Habits Create Culture

I’ve tried to convince some coaching clients to read more. I’ve even presented them with the idea that they may read more than they realize, why not do it more constructively? It matters for some, but for others they just never indulge.

Podcasts are popular in some circles, but everyone wants to know the best of the best first, without really shopping around. These are limits, limited beliefs, values, and ways of doing things.

Values and traditions, they of course build what we call culture. Is the culture where you work strained? Is it because everyone is like minded or is it because of different values, beliefs, and traditions? Are those differences managed constructively or destructively?

Attraction Matters

Do you believe attraction matters? Whatever you do for your business, what you do for your customers, or what you do to grow your career, will always matter most to those who are interested.

People who don’t get involved with social media, they don’t really care about social media. People who don’t like football, NASCAR, or reality TV won’t tune in and they won’t see your masterful thirty second commercial.

When people don’t like to read, they probably won’t. When they don’t like social media they probably won’t join. An organization that doesn’t see a bigger future probably won’t care much about your career.

Everything that you do or want to accomplish will only happen in an atmosphere that embraces what you are selling.

It is true for advancing your career, for selling your product, or for building an effective team.

People who don’t connect with it will probably never buy it.

Attraction matters.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect,Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
job satisfaction

Job Satisfaction May Be What You Create

Tags : 

Monday is the drag yourself to work day, Wednesday there is a glimmer of hope, and Friday is the day many wait for anxiously. Does this sound like you or someone on your team? Is job satisfaction something that each person can create?

Why We Work

There are of course, people who only want to work for one reason. By choice or by submission to the years of drudgery, they are paycheck only employees. Certainly though, there are those who are enthusiastic and career minded.

For the career minded, one of the most popular ways to create your career is to predict it. You graduate from high school. You make a decision about college or no college. Observations of family and friends occur. Then you listen to guidance from teachers, elders, and those who want to sell you a path.

That isn’t all though, you make a choice to make an investment. Usually connected to time, money, and amount of effort, what you are really hoping to do is get the prediction correct. What you see for the future and the place that you want to be is a prediction.

There is a sizable lot that does this, and does it effectively. When you look around though, you are really making a prediction. The best prediction of all may be that predicting your future is unlikely.

Career Changes and Job Descriptions

Millions of people make career changes. The factory closes, the technology shifts, or the difference between a paycheck and career start to sink in. Predicting your future or your job satisfaction is difficult, but creating a better outlook for your future may be something you can control.

When I work with small businesses, the percentage of those who have job descriptions for all employees is something less than fifty percent. If you were to add in the relevance of the work performed as compared with what is on the job description you would find an even deeper discrepancy in accuracy.

Employees can get nervous about their job description. Often they shudder with the thought that they will be targeted for poor performance or that the description will list a task or duty that they find undesirable. Sometimes this may happen and in other cases, it is simply a negative fantasy.

Job Satisfaction

Instead, what if your job description is considered an opportunity? Imagine if the job description has the possibility to be co-created. When the supervisor asks you to create a list of your duties as you see them, is that a problem or an opportunity?

The best path for your job satisfaction may not be in predicting the future. Perhaps the best path is to create it.

You may not be able to create one hundred percent of it. In fact, complete creation is unlikely. However, every chunk, every point, and every opportunity you have to steer, will make a difference across time.

Job satisfaction is not an image or comparison, for many positions, it is what you create.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


  • -
Attitude everything

Is Attitude Everything or Just Something?

Tags : 

Recently someone asked me what makes an employee special. The conversation was centered on a particular employee known to both of us and how he, or why he, was promoted. My suggestion was that his attitude made the difference. Is attitude everything or just something?

Skills and Attitude

Skills are important and nearly everyone focuses on skill building. Is attitude a skill? We know that hammering a nail requires a little skill and a little energy and there is labor involved. The same is true about attitude. We often just don’t understand the aspects of emotional labor.

Most jobs require specific skill. Therefore, nearly everyone has demonstrated that they have acquired the skills necessary to do the job. You don’t have to look far to find someone who has more experience, a different or better education, and perhaps even some natural talent that sets them apart.

Leverage and Labor

Recently, I was asked to speak to a small group about entrepreneurship. One of the underlying principles of my talk was about leverage. In my business, leverage is everything. Most of the work, the marketing, and the building of intellectual property, it is all leveraged.

Leverage and your emotional labor are what sets most people apart.

People pursue the degree, not a bad choice.

People work hard and for great lengths of time, which is reputable, respected.

In the workplace, people with the wrong attitude are seldom promoted.

Your knowledge, skills, and abilities are only the minimum requirements. Consider the decisions and choices that people make throughout the day, for many days, for the time that some people will call a career, this is what makes the difference.

Is Attitude Everything

When you endure the emotional labor, you’ll create something.

Prove you have the ability to navigate the political currents, adjust your habits, set your ego aside, and work to help not just to finish. Most of all, when you bring your energy, demonstrate resilience, and show up better than the rest you’ll have leverage.

Is attitude everything? Your attitude is not just something. When attitude is what you stand for, you’ll stand out.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


Search This Website

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Upcoming Public Events

  1. Managers Toolbox Event – Williamsport

    October 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  2. Developing Middle Managers : Part 1

    October 16 @ 8:00 am - October 18 @ 5:00 pm
  3. Bridging the Gap Event

    October 24 @ 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

Blog (Filter) Categories

Follow me on Twitter

Assessment Services and Tools

Strategic, Competency, or Needs Assessments, DiSC Assessments, 360 Feedback, and more. Learn more