Tag Archives: career

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success planning

Success Planning and Actions That Take You There

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Do you know what you are doing three weeks from now? What about two months from now, do you plan your days, or do they just happen? Have you thought about how success planning matters?

Many people get up every day and go to work. They go through the motions. The path that they are on is the same path every day, the path that appears, what pops up and things that must be done. Is that a plan?

Sure, there is the staff meeting next week, and oh, we are closed for about eight holidays per year. That isn’t really planning though.

Same Thing, Different Day

Days turn into weeks, weeks to months, and months to years. Does your path only change by chance, by luck encounters, or by the actions taken by someone else?

While this message may be a little about discipline that sometimes isn’t the biggest obstacle. Sometimes the biggest obstacle is that people let life happen to them, not make it happen for them.

It is easy to sit back after a few years and wonder what you’ve done. Also easy is to blame someone else if you aren’t where you thought you would be.

Coasting

Everyday people go to work. They take the train, ride a bus, or drive their car. They enter their workspace and start their day, just as they did yesterday. For the most part, it is thoughtless. It is a sequence of actions and behaviors that meet the job requirements.

This is not success planning. This is cruising. Cruising is coasting, you only coast one way, downhill.

Success Planning

If you’re going to make a difference you’re going to have to sell, leap, connect, get involved, give, change, let go, risk, challenge, feel uncomfortable, build a plan, and take action.

Success planning is important, but so is action.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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meaningful workplace

Building Meaningful Workplace Relationships

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Work is, well, a lot of work. At least most believe this to be the case. Many of us will spend much of our adult lives active in the workforce. Do you build meaningful workplace relationships? Are there connections to relationships and your career?

One of the most important factors that affects your career are your workplace relationships. Some of them may be (appropriately) personal, others strictly business, and some are in between.

This is true internally within the organization and it is true externally with clients, customers, and stakeholders.

We have two main paths that form the relationships that we build, or the ones that we don’t.

Walls and Lines

The first may be to put up walls. Everyone is a jerk until he or she proves it to you that they are not. You look for what angers you, frightens you, or you use stereotypes to keep people at distance.

Taken one-step farther you may create challenges, obstacles, or draw a line and give warning that it should not be crossed.

You may discover that what you seek, you’ll find.

Inquire and Appreciate

A different approach may work better, what if you welcome relationships. Imagine if you seek to build them, ask for input, and inquire about thoughts that may be different from your own. Instead of building walls or creating obstacles, you invite ideas, different thinking, and new possibilities.

Imagine if the person isn’t old, isn’t young, male, or female. What if where they live, how they look, or where they went to school mattered less and the fact that they are just people who are invited to participate mattered more.

Again, you may discover that what you seek, you’ll find.

Meaningful Workplace Relationships

What you get from your job, your friends, and your life is largely based on your network. Size has some importance, but integrity and quality matter more.

Building meaningful workplace relationships can expand your opportunities, your intellect, and even your bank account.

There are times to choose sides, stick with the team, and work hard to beat the competition. In fact, is some regards they can be enduring qualities.

Just keep in mind that what you build will largely depend on what you seek.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Performance affects your career

How Performance Affects Your Career

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Students and professionals alike are often thinking about the future of their career. Our focus often becomes about changing, learning, and growing. All of this is good stuff but is it really how performance affects your career?

Many people buy the book, they watch the video, and they pursue additional education. Certainly, those are worthwhile investments.

Short-term Events

Unfortunately, many of those same people will attempt to position what happens next based on a short-term event. Get the new job, achieve a promotion, and insist on the higher salary. All good ideas, but they are events.

Some change may occur the moment you decide you’re going to make it happen, but getting there is usually a long-term process.

Presenting Problems

Recently, a client telephoned me with an expressed need. In my line of work, we often call this the presenting problem. The presenting problem was what they viewed as a technical issue. They were seeking some technical training but expressed they couldn’t find any training programs that fit.

In reality, the technical skills were present, the workplace habits and culture was the root of the problem. We all know that a problem fixed, that isn’t at the root, is a problem that will reoccur.

Presenting problems and the real problem are not always the same. What they wanted, as commanded by the CEO, was a technical fix. What they really needed was a program related to their technical need but one that reinforces changing their habits and organizational culture.

Perhaps most important is that this organization was looking for an event that would solve their problem.

Change Process

Events may single handedly inspire change. It may create the moment that you decide. Events typically don’t yield systemic change. An event may spark it, but long-term effort is what will create it.

This is true for organizational development. It is also true for individual career growth.

Performance Affects Your Career

Change is a process that includes persistence, tenacity, and consistent effort. It is not just a one-time occurrence, or single event, but a long-term process.

Performance affects your career, but for growth, it will take more than a single event or learning a technical skill. It will be what you develop across time. It is a process of habits consistently repeated.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Future Career Appreciative Strategies

Your Future Career Depends On You

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All the work that you do requires decisions. You make the choice to go to work, at some level, what you’ll wear, and how you’ll arrive. Certainly, you’ll make the choice about attitude, commitment, and effort. What you do today and tomorrow will impact your future career.

In my business I will occasionally hear stories of, “I can’t” or “we can’t.” Not so long ago I was working with a client in a facilitated training event and someone responded to a question by saying something along the lines of, “We can do this, or we can do that, but we can’t do both.”

Honestly, I was somewhat surprised by the comment since this person was in a room full of peers and some senior management. Then it hit me, this person was reciting a thought embraced the culture. It wasn’t shocking to some. It was a belief.

Limiting Beliefs

My reaction to the comment was that this segment of the discussion was critical and I reconnected with opening comments of the session about how businesses change and succeed.

I took advantage of a comment made a few moments earlier and suggested that being average is easy, becoming better is hard. My intent was to solidify concepts connected with hard work pays off. A period was put on the discussion with, “It won’t be easy, it will be hard, and that is why we call it work.”

Culture is very interesting, because those deeply engaged in their culture don’t really see it any other way. They are limited by the idea that they “can’t.” Although they are trapped in the mind-set, they honestly believe that it is a truth that they won’t change.

Everyday Choice

Every employee who comes to work each day makes a choice. Your future career will depend on the choices you make today.

One mind-set is that you will do just enough to get by. You won’t work too hard or too fast. You’ll occupy space for the required impression of hours on the job and join the ranks of those who speak with pride about the hours spent.

Nebulous Measurement

In this mind-set the measurements and metrics connected with your job are fuzzy and are likely a spillover from the last person who held the same role. Or, now that this job is the combination of two previous jobs you can’t possibly overachieve.

You are often encouraged by others to do the least, or work within the effort of limitations set by everyone else.

Different Choice

You do have another choice. This choice is not directly connected with pay. It certainly is not directly connected by others who want you to move slower, at their pace, or to be patient and put in your time.

Today the most important choice you make about your career is not about on-the-job tradeoffs. It is not about I can do this, or I can do that, but I can’t do both. It is more likely about finding a way to balance both.

Here is the reality, when you don’t, someone else will.

Your Future Career

This is true for organizations and it is true for individuals. In many workplace cultures, this part of story is never told. Across time, the culture of effort and productivity has leveled itself to the output of averages.

When every day is embraced as an opportunity you’ll make the choice to do enough to get by, or you’ll do more than what is required because it may be the last or only chance you’ll get.

This may be the most important decision you’ll make. It will determine the future of your career.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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build better careers

Expectations Build Better Careers

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Most of our analysis of life is conditioned by our expectations. Expectations affect everyone’s outlook. They apply to the perfectionist, the idealist, and the pragmatist. High ambition or low, expectations condition results. How do expectations build better careers?

It might seem odd when you think about it. We often tell our friends what we want to quit, but are more quiet about what we really want to achieve. We’ll talk about cutting sugar from our diet, cutting back on junk food, or even about not letting the small stuff get us upset.

Cutbacks typically garnish support. Friends remind friends to have one less beer, to quit smoking, or to consume fewer calories. That is great, in a sense. That may be one of the many great things about friends.

What About Ambitions

What about the other side, what about ambitions, are they supported? If you say you want to complete the college degree, be promoted to vice president, or earn the big bucks, do you get support?

Unfortunately, ambitions are often met with jealously, envy, or the face of insecurity from others. People claim that others who are on the move may be bragging or are narcissistic. If you can support the quit and the cut back or cut out, then you had better be there to support ambitions.

Ambitions are built from expectations. Low or moderate expectations create an opening for easy achievement, average results, or a blending of the crowd. High expectations feel risky and almost out of reach which is exactly why you need more support.

Our success in life, or in some cases perhaps our happiness is conditioned by our expectations. Our expectations are supported, or not, by our friends, family, and colleagues.

I remember in junior high school one of the teachers had a mural in the classroom which contained the words, “great expectations.” Illustrating what was expected from the students. The belief was that it conditioned results. It still moves me today.

Build Better Careers

Our success is often conditioned by what we believe. The Wright brothers believed in flight, Microsoft, and Apple in what some considered crazy dreams. Henry Ford believed in cars, and William Harley and Arthur Davidson in motorcycles. They all had great expectations.

Expectations will help you accomplish your career goals. Make sure you are getting the support you need. Most of all, make sure that you are giving it to others.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours!, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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holding back your career

3 Common Fears Holding Back Your Career

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Many people work hard during their career. Some believe that they are focused and committed to achieving more. Some believe they are creating their own legacy. Others feel stuck or stalled. Which one are you? What is holding back your career?

There is always a lot of chatter about fear and what holds people back. Some recognize their fear, look it in the eye, and overcome it. Still there are others, unfortunately, who claim to be the victim of wrongdoing, tough breaks, and unfair treatment.

It seems that there might be plenty of all of that to go around. Are there fears holding back your career?

3 C’s of Career Stall

Here are three common fears that hold people back:

  • Competition. Competition motivates many people and that is a good thing. Other people really don’t want to compete. It might be easier or safer to hold back, to not face the risk, and just move along. Recognizing competitors is exactly what many career stalls need to get jump-started.
  • Critics. If you are doing anything, achieving anything, making moves and getting noticed you’re definitely going to have some critics. On the highest level, it may be worth listening to a few of their comments, just to keep you moving in the right direction. However, much of it should be left behind or sent to the curb with yesterday’s garbage.
  • Change. Stable, normal, the same—are all within our comfort zone. Change makes us uneasy, nervous, and afraid. You might always order your favorite dish at your favorite restaurant, and that is OK. In order for you to really reach for something more you’re going to have to give up something you’re comfortable with and replace it with something new.

Holding Back Your Career

Honestly, fear more than anything else holds people back. It isn’t a lack of talent, intelligence, or opportunity, it is fear.

We might convince ourselves that we aren’t worthy. The timing might be wrong, the situation not quite right, often it is our own narrative that holds us back from progress.

Let go of any negative fantasies. Use competition and critics as a motivator. Be willing to give up something that you are holding on to.

Cut the cord, break the chain and unleash all that you have.

Stop holding back.

-DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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right group appreciative strategies

Join the Right Group, You’re The Product of Your Crowd

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Many people are interested to make some positive changes. Advance their career, learn more, and even earn more. If we are the product of the people we hang around, joining the right group might be important.

There are plenty of snake oil salespeople out there. There are thousands and thousands of people pushing a theory about how to get rich quick, what to say to your boss, or how to develop your career. You might be connected to some of them.

Some of them provide opportunities. Join their group, get involved, and grow. The best of the groups offer positive impact, promote positive actions, and are well founded by people who have the background and experience to create real impact. They walk their talk.

Others might be pushing snake oil, the quick fix, the how to tell off your boss, and how to quit your job today and become rich. They might suggest those who don’t succeed don’t take enough risk, don’t work hard enough, and give up too easily.

There might be some truth in both groups and both crowds. It is tempting to follow our emotions and sometimes those choices are okay, other times a disaster. The hardest part is making the right choice on which group you’ll join.

Groups In Action

I recently attended a networking event. My standard practice is to be sure to meet some new people. It’s a networking event, not a reunion. So I networked and met a few people, most of them great.

I met some others too, watched them work the room, tell their stories, and attempt to sell their oil.

Figuratively speaking, I’m not sure if anyone made a purchase, but certainly, some listened intently. The artisans dropped names, dropped buzzwords, and smiled a lot.

Two people in particular caught my eye. We met. Both told stories. They spoke of high impact success; name dropped, and provided some of their oily theories.

Our conversation was effective for them until I asked a few questions. Then the mood changed, the posture shifted and they made a fast exit.

Right Group

There are plenty of people selling anyone something. Be cautious of the quick fix, the attraction to the fast track and easy street. Telling off the boss and walking off the job is probably never a good idea.

Ask questions and keep this in mind, sometimes it is the answers to the questions that should be questioned.

Join the right group.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

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rough spots appreciative strategies

Surviving The Rough Spots

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Everything is cyclical. People sometimes wonder how they will survive the rough spots, the down turns, the let downs, the end of an era. It might be for a particular task, a way of doing things, or it might be the loss of a job or an entire business. How do you survive the rough spots?

Habits

We are creatures of habit. We typically make our decisions and choices based on a set of data. That data has been formed across time based largely on our own experiences. Experiences created by habits.

Sometimes we have to be willing to give up on the old in order to make room for the new. This is true for all of our habits, traditions, and how we frame every circumstance or situation.

There is a lot of advice. Advice to see the glass half-full, be positive, and focus on the end result.

None of that is bad advice but it might be hard to implement when our habits have led us to the place where we currently are. It is what we know, how we think, and how we’ll make our next decision.

When you really want to breakthrough, you’ll have to change. Change might appear to be about mind-set, but mostly mind-set is about the decision to change. People who haven’t decided to change won’t have the mind-set.

Rough Spots

Sometimes the decision is made for us, but surviving the rough spots still requires us to change. Change our mind-set, our habits, and traditions.

When the tool is broken, we have to decide to find another way. Find a new tool, use an old one, or do nothing.

If we experience a job loss or a business shift, we have to find another way. Find a new job, make a career change, or do nothing.

Surviving

Our habits really matter. They condition our thinking, the results and future outcomes.

If the way we always did it isn’t an option then we have to do something different.

Sometimes we have to get out of our own way. We have to decide to make new habits.

Everything changes when we finally make the decision that we will.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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all in sales appreciative strategies

This Is Why We Are All In Sales

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Professionally holding a position in sales is an admirable career. However, many people suggest that the sales role is not for them. They might scoff at the idea of a position in sales, yet they are often envious of the paycheck. Are we all in sales?

Nearly thirty years ago, I held a position in information technology. I wrote code, fixed program bugs, and served as an expert with voice and data communications. That was a long time ago. Although it might not seem apparent, I was also in sales.

Not formally perhaps, but I had to sell my ideas, sell software enhancements and sell hardware upgrades. The type of business I worked for was known as a mail order company. Today it might be a dot com and as such, selling was important.

Commission, not salary, compensated formal sales positions and it was challenging but often rewarding work.

Perceptions of Job Roles

I can still recall a conversation with one of the top salespersons who challenged me one day in the hallway. He approached me about some problem or difficulty he was having and we had a very mild difference of opinion. As our short conversation was winding down he said, “Why am I asking you. You don’t know anything about sales.”

It wasn’t intended to be polite. The intention was a direct hit. The concept was to knock me down, push me back, and insult me professionally. It didn’t work.

My simple response was, “I sell every day.”  He came back with, “Yeah, how?”

We Are All In Sales

Recently I had convinced the board of investors to make this business unit the data center for the six other business units they operated. Just a few days earlier, they had announced this change at an all company meeting.

The investment in computer hardware upgrades exceeded $400k and the opportunity that this brought to our location was huge.

Therefore, my response was, “Well, I just sold a $400,000 computer system to our investors.”

Unsure of what to say next, my assailant just huffed and walked away.

Most of us are in sales, not always formally, often informally. We still sell ourselves, sell our ideas, and sometimes actually sell products or services.

Do you think we’re all in sales?

What are you selling?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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career shift appreciative strategies

Career Shift: Moving Past the Easy Stuff

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You see some interesting things in my line of work. Many people proclaiming to be eager about making a difference for their business, their career, and their life. Certainly, I see many businesses and people improve, but do they really make a business or career shift that meets or exceeds their potential?

The expression that hindsight is 20/20 or that it is easy to be a Monday morning quarterback has truth but the biggest gap I often see is another expression, “Talk is cheap.”

Motivation for Change

It is not uncommon when I engage in a generational differences discussion that someone will bring up the concept of being lazy or lacking motivation.

Often the generations of people who have been around longer are passing judgment or stereotypes on those generations newest in our workforce. Regardless of where the finger is being pointed, the accusations are still present.

The presenting question often is, “How do we motivate these people?” Answers aren’t really that difficult. On the other hand, creating the change necessary to execute the required behaviors or culture is the challenge.

It seems that there is a trend for easy. Relax more, work less, and enjoy life. Maybe everyone wants that, it sounds very inviting.

More Than Talk

People who want to change their life, change their career, or change their business must be committed to change. I’ll often ask clients if they are committed and time and time again they tell the story and say the right words, but, “Talk is cheap.

Change can often happen without any growth or control over your own fate. So you can change without growth but you’ll never grow without making some changes.

People and businesses settle into habits, habits that generate daily activities, thought processes, and attitudes. When it really comes down to the effort for change, they don’t realize that they must change those habits and traditions to get a different result.

Talking about change, planning for change, or seeing the goal is not the act of creating change.

Change often sounds simple. Just like the idea that everyone knows the concepts of customer service or how to be a leader. Knowing the concepts and successfully executing them are two completely different things.

Career Shift

People who are on the move, the ones who are really changing, they’ve moved past the easy stuff. They are finished talking. Talking wastes their time.

If you really want a career shift, you’ll have to decide what you are going to give up, throw away, or move to the side.

You’ll have to move past the easy stuff, the cheap stuff, and the daydreams.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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