Tag Archives: career growth

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Career encouragement

Career Encouragement, Is It Time To Give More?

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In the workplace, goals are often measured against management expectations, historical data, or industry benchmarks. How do goals align with career accomplishments? Do we need more career encouragement?

Winning Little League baseball teams often pop up out of nowhere from a small otherwise unknown town. The football star was just an average kid who loved the sport and played anywhere a few kids could find a patch of grass. The kid who read books all the time went on to become a PhD, a medical doctor, or an engineer.

Born or Made

In leadership seminars I often ask, “Are great leaders born or made?” Participants stop to think, and ponder this simple question. Of course, in some cultures family heritage has something to do with those in power but in US culture this is not the case.

Leadership is something built, it is learned, and the best are committed to it. Is encouragement required to become great? Does feedback affect outcomes of success or a lack of it?

Encouragement and Trophies

Encouragement became popular with the participation trophy generation. The idea may have been that more encouragement led to great things. Give every kid a trophy, it is encouraging. People forgot though that the reality of life is not always so kind.

Are you building your career? Are you encouraging someone to build their own?

History Says

In the history of the United States, there have only been forty five Presidents. For General Motors, there have only been fourteen CEO’s, and perhaps there has only been one Albert Einstein, one Wernher von Braun, and one Charles Darwin.

Do genetics, family history, or a high intelligence quotient have something to do with success, perhaps, in some ways, yes. Others may cite luck, more opportunity, and the best connections as having a hand in success. Still, success seems to pop up from anywhere.

Encouragement and Confidence

People often become very good at something that interests them. Chances are great that interest sparked and grew to flames when encouragement boosted confidence. When pleasing onlookers felt rewarding and when the responsibility perform felt achievable.

Careers are often built from self-interests and a focus on successive accomplishments across time.

Career Encouragement

Not every ball player will turn pro, and of the many who do, only very few will leave a lasting mark in the record books. Only a few will become President of the United States, few will be the CEO of a century old business, and even fewer will lead monumental discoveries in science or physics.

One thing seems certain though, the people who work for something better and who are encouraged often attain it.

A career is built, career encouragement helps those on their journey to attain it.

Now is a good time to give more.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a five-time author and some of his work includes, #CustServ The Customer Service Culture, and Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce. Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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career patience appreciative strategies

Career Patience and Emotional Labor

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People interested in career advancement get pretty excited, they typically don’t lack motivation or drive. When is career patience important and how do you endure it while time passes by?

Your career is important. It is often how people measure their worth or success in life. Today many people have multiple careers. They may change from fire fighter to schoolteacher, or from sales person to a marketing expert, or any other role change you might imagine.

Employment recruiters and human resources professionals can tell you a lot about job seekers and career changers. They can share popular trends, what to look for, and even about how long to expect to wait before a change.

Although the earliest of the baby boomers weren’t big on career changes. Today career changes, job changes, and advancement seem almost necessary. People sometimes feel like it is a requirement to prove your worth.

Not so fast though, don’t jump too far ahead. Sometimes the best moves involve more patience.

Career Patience

Right sizing your patience is important. After joining an organization or team how long do you wait for advancement? Trends might be different depending on the type of work, but chances are great that the trends are shorter now as compared to forty years ago.

Senior leaders might question if you are ready. They might argue that you haven’t paid your dues. Often the suggestion is to have more patience. Is that good advice?

When we join a team we are often hired with a minimum skill or education requirement. We are framed to be competent because of our expertise, proven record of accomplishment, and qualifications. Job hops are evaluated and an interview or two tries to determine your character, attitude, and your ability fit.

Do you want to grow in your position? Are you ready? Have you proven yourself?

Your career is often not about just showing up. It isn’t even about your technical skills, your education, or your track record. It may have more to do with emotional intelligence and even emotional labor.

Emotional Labor

When you have to have patience yet be assertive, and when you have the skills, qualities, reputation, and experience, what is missing?

Sometimes we have to be willing to be patient. Patience is emotional labor. It is the work that we do without a manual, a technical skill, or background check.

Emotional labor is what we endure. It is the dress for success, speaking the language, and effectively representing where we want to be. It might be developing into the perfect fit.

We don’t always get the new job or advancement and then grow into it. We might have to grow out of the job we currently have first.

Demonstrating career patience may be the most hurried thing that you do.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Role Models and Why We Need Them

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Who are your role models? Do you really need them? Has anyone ever asked you about role models?

role models

In one form or another I’ve been helping others in the workplace for three decades. I’ve had the great fortune of seeing many people grow and develop their careers.

Unfortunately I’ve watched even more slip through the cracks just short of their reach for something more.

Sure, some people believe they can breakthrough on their own. Those with strong willpower and desire (hunger) probably can.  That same person with the help of a good coach or mentor can probably achieve it sooner and with more quality, fewer mistakes, and a greater reputation for their work.

Role Models

Many of the people who I coach get this question from me, “Who are your role models?” Honestly, I typically don’t get a quick answer, and I don’t expect one. However, having a great role model or several role models can significantly impact your career.

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits to having a great role model comes from trying to close the gap.

You know the gap. It’s the one between your current behaviors, your knowledge, your skills and abilities, and those of the role model. Without a solid goal or a vision of where you want to be, you’ll likely not go very far.

When people attend school they feel an obligation to learn. When people attend a workshop, participate in an on-line course, read a book (or blog), watch a video, listen to a podcast, or receive advice from a mentor or coach they might feel a similar obligation.

The obligation is the relationship that exists between the student and the teacher. It’s a good one, but it’s different when compared with the obligation of becoming more like your role model.

Why We Need Them

People with role models set a visionary standard for themselves. They hold the role model in the highest regard. They respect, admire, and honor those who have set an example that they would like to follow.

Perhaps most important, they take responsibility to achieve more and they own the appreciation and humility often required to propel them to the next level.

This is their obligation, not because someone told them they should or must, but because it is their desire. It might be a grandparent, parent, brother or sister. Sometimes it might be a teacher, religious leader, or their boss. In other cases, it might come from a book, a movie, or even a friend’s recommendation.

The difference is that they own it, they own it by choice.

Make a Selection

Choose a role model, or select a few of the very best qualities from several.

Everyone needs role models, not just because they set the example, but because we find it an honor to strive to be that good.

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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Career Growth, It Sometimes Happens Off The Job

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Making a difference in your career will make a difference in your life. People often associate their career growth with what happens on the job, and while that is important it is often equally or more important to consider what you do off the job.

Career growth read more

Balancing work and life has been a popular topic area for many years. People often talk about working too much, getting stressed out, and even about being burnt out. It’s true, it happens, and often it feels like it sneaks up on you and grabs you from behind.

When I’m coaching or training people I hear a lot about the desire for career growth, the desire for a bigger paycheck, or some combination of health and wealth personal improvement.

That’s not really a surprise. Most people might assume that is the kind of conversations that might be uncovered. What is often somewhat surprising is when they learn that the suggestions for improving their position or circumstances are often just as much about what happens off the job, as on.

On The Job Mindset

There is a mindset that has great intentions. The mindset is that once you are active in the workforce, once you’ve had some formal education and on the job training, everything that happens next will be about what you do on the job.

Your work, your effort, and your focus, you play by the rules, you work honestly and with integrity. All of this, yes, it’s incredibly important.

You pay your dues, you gain more experience, and you’re committed to the organization so you’re expecting more. More opportunity, more responsibility, and often more money, that is great and certainly part of the process but it is likely not all of it.

Career Growth

Sometimes, your opportunities for growth and development have to do with what you do off the job. This isn’t the first time I’ve written about some of these opportunities. Recently I wrote about, 5 Ways to Grow Your Career, which included some on the job, and off the job considerations.

Are you looking for a great way to improve your skills and get more opportunities? Are you seeking more respect and confidence in your abilities among your colleagues or boss? You should strongly consider what you read. Yes, I said read.

While it could be argued that reading anything, romance, drama, or even horror, is better than reading nothing. Those seeking business or personal improvement might want to consider content that directly relates. Consider genres for self-improvement, management and leadership, or something technical or scientific that has a link to your profession.

Reading will help to improve your focus, your grammar, and certainly your intellect. It will help you with direct knowledge about a skill area, make your conversations more powerful, and improve your presence while also making your interactions more compelling.

If it is technical and related to your field it might help you to gain knowledge on the latest trends, best practices, or lessons learned.

If it is motivational or self-improvement it might help you to become more focused, stay focused, or find the strength to continue moving forward.

Books or articles about business, management, or leadership might help you strengthen your professional relationships, build better teams, and become a better communicator.

Doing this off the job helps create better positioning for you on the job, which just might mean, career growth.

Start Reading More

Therefore, you might want to consider reading more. It seems like starting conversations with friends or colleagues differently might help too. Instead of asking, “What’s up?” you might want to ask, “What are you currently reading?”

I know time is precious. There are on the job requirements, and also time requirements for family and friends. There is shopping, chores, and even getting appropriate amounts of exercise, rest and relaxation. All of those are critically important but if you want to grow in your career you should consider taking the time to read.

What are you reading?

– DEG

Dennis E. Gilbert is a business consultant, speaker (CSPTM), and corporate trainer that specializes in helping businesses and individuals accelerate their leadership, their team, and their success. He is a four-time author and some of his work includes, Forgotten Respect, Navigating A Multigenerational Workforce and Pivot and Accelerate, The Next Move Is Yours! Reach him through his website at Dennis-Gilbert.com or by calling +1 646.546.5553.

Dennis Gilbert on Google+


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